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  1. #1
    xx-google@telefog.com
    Guest
    Whenever anyone dials my Oakland, California, Cingular phone
    (510-637-xxxx) from within the Bay Area, using any type of phone, there
    is invariably a 6-second delay from the time that they finish dialing
    to the time that the phone begins to ring (both on my end and on their
    end).

    This isn't a problem when people dial my cellphone directly; they don't
    notice the delay and they just wait for the ring. However, I've
    arranged my telephone life as follows. I have everyone just call my
    home phone number, on which I have delayed call forwarding. I have it
    set at three rings, to allow me to answer the call on my home phone if
    I'm home. After three rings, the call is forwarded to my cellphone.
    Here's the problem: because the caller has already heard my home phone
    ringing, the 6-second silence (created by the 6-second Cingular delay
    that commences when the call is forwarded) causes some of my callers to
    conclude that the call was dropped or terminated, and therefore they
    hang up before my Cingular phone begins to ring. I've missed some
    important messages as a result.

    Not all Bay Area Cingular numbers have this 6-second delay. To try to
    understand the problem, I've done quite a bit of random dialing within
    Cingular's Bay Area prefixes, and it seems that the delay occurs on
    roughly 90% of their numbers. The delay occurs among fewer of the
    Cingular numbers that reside on ex-ATT prefixes, such as these on this
    switch in Concord, California:

    http://members.dandy.net/~czg/lca_pr...ch=CNCRCADOCM3

    For example, when I dialed some (925) 683- numbers in sequence, I found
    that 4157, 4163, 4172, 4174, and 4175 don't have the 6-second delay.

    You could do some random dialing of your own, on the prefixes of your
    choice. (You will be causing minor irritation to the random Cingular
    subscribers whose numbers you dial, so I would suggest that you do it
    during the day and that you dial any particular number only once.)

    On the numbers that don't have the 6-second delay, you'll note
    something interesting: many of them begin ringing with a ring that
    doesn't resemble the successive rings. This first ring is louder and
    has a different quality. This puzzles me. Could it be a dummy ring
    that Cingular engineers inserted to minimize the very ring delay that
    I'm complaining about?

    I've called Cingular tech support, and they've confirmed my observation
    that there's variation in the ring delay among Cingular numbers, but
    they couldn't explain it and they couldn't tell me how I could arrange
    to have a number without a ring delay.

    Yesterday, I went into a Cingular store, hoping to find some
    salesperson who understands the problem. No such luck. I did find a guy
    who was sufficiently intrigued by it that he put my SIM temporarily
    into his own phone (a Motorola V551) and then called my number. Then he
    gave me a new SIM (without charge). Neither approach made a difference:
    the 6-second delay was intact. (My phone, by the way, is a Motorola
    V180.)

    I care about this because I really like having my home phone forward to
    my cellphone and because if I can solve the problem, I would happily
    enter into a two-year Cingular contract so I could give up my current
    Pay As You Go account, which I got partly so I could sample Cingular's
    service. I like Cingular, but this ring delay might be enough to nudge
    me to Verizon Wireless instead. (By the way, my cursory research
    indicates that Verizon and Sprint don't have a ring delay, while
    T-Mobile and Nextel have a delay like Cingular's.)

    Somewhere in the Bay Area, there are rooms full of Cingular techs or
    Cingular engineers, and some among them probably understand the delay
    and know how to get rid of it. They don't engage in customer contact,
    but if I knew where to find them, I might attempt contact anyway.

    But alt.cellular.cingular might be a good bet:

    ∑∑∑∑∑ What causes the ring delay?

    ∑∑∑∑∑ How could I get rid of it?

    ∑∑∑∑∑ Who at Cingular could explain or solve the delay?

    Thanks in advance.


    **********
    1366294709




    See More: 6-second ring delay on my Cingular number



  2. #2
    Jud Hardcastle
    Guest

    Re: 6-second ring delay on my Cingular number

    In article <1136364420.594246.262620@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>, xx-
    google@telefog.com says...
    > Whenever anyone dials my Oakland, California, Cingular phone
    > (510-637-xxxx) from within the Bay Area, using any type of phone, there
    > is invariably a 6-second delay from the time that they finish dialing
    > to the time that the phone begins to ring (both on my end and on their
    > end).


    I timed it just now and I'm seeing about 5 seconds in Dallas with the
    phone's ring and the callers ring nearly at the same time. GSM may be
    waiting until the system locates the phone and gets a "okay I'm
    ringing" handshake before it sounds the first ring for the caller. That
    way it can honor the various GSM forwarding options or send the call to
    voice mail after the first "ring". Maybe someone with more GSM tech
    knowledge can confirm that. Could be the ones that aren't delaying are
    the old switches that generate rings without waiting.

    Six seconds really isn't a long delay--most callers won't notice that
    short a delay--but...
    >
    > arranged my telephone life as follows. I have everyone just call my
    > home phone number, on which I have delayed call forwarding. I have it
    > set at three rings, to allow me to answer the call on my home phone if
    > I'm home. After three rings, the call is forwarded to my cellphone.
    > Here's the problem: because the caller has already heard my home phone
    > ringing, the 6-second silence (created by the 6-second Cingular delay
    > that commences when the call is forwarded) causes some of my callers to
    > conclude that the call was dropped or terminated, and therefore they
    > hang up before my Cingular phone begins to ring. I've missed some


    Yep, been there done that. The delay itself may not be the entire
    problem. Most people seem to hang up immediately after/or during the
    4th ring. Seems to be an instinctive reaction for humans! :-)

    I've found that normal delayed/conditional forwarding is pretty much
    useless because of that--if they hang up at the 4th ring at best you get
    ONE ring on the cellular--even if you answer quickly often they've
    already hung up. The "dumb" systems that generate psuedo rings while
    the system is locating the phone just makes it worse.

    I used to have Personal Ring Service that Cingular (then SWBell
    Wireless) offered--it would ring all the phones you'd told it about at
    the same time and route the call to the one you answered. BUT it
    immediately started giving the caller dummy rings. The system itself
    worked perfectly but it was totally unusable because I was missing far
    too many calls because people would hang up before I actually got the
    call.

    Note the same problem existed early in the cellular days while roaming
    outside your home area. The system would start "ringing" before it
    actually found the phone--by the time the roaming phone started ringing
    the callers would hang up.

    I tried Ureach.com's "follow me" service for awhile. It rings a list of
    numbers in sequence until it finds you but it had the same problem. The
    caller doesn't know what's happening and hangs up long before the call
    gets to you.

    What HAS worked for me is a one-number service from Accessline. It has
    the same ability to call multiple numbers in sequence but it's flexable
    enough to allow me to put messages where I want them. For example you
    can have the first number ring 3 times then insert a message "Your call
    is being forwarded to another number--please wait or press x to go
    directly to voice mail" BEFORE the 2nd number starts ringing--and so on.
    That seems to "reset" the caller to wait another 3 to 4 rings. Or you
    can set it to play a message "This is xxx--your call is being forwarded
    to my cell phone--please allow extra ring time" or such before ANY
    rings. Actually there's another benefit for having a message up front--
    machine generated junk calls see the message and immediately hang up!!!
    Which comes in handy since I've permanently forwarded my main home
    number to the AL number--then have AL send the call back to a non-
    forwarded custom ring number if it's configured to send the call to the
    house. Plus everything ends up in one voice mail system. And no I
    don't work for them--just happy with something that works--my point
    being that if you can get a message in there early enough to tell the
    caller what to expect then they won't hang up so quickly.
    --
    Jud
    Dallas TX USA



  3. #3
    tmoran@acm.org
    Guest

    Re: 6-second ring delay on my Cingular number

    >I've found that normal delayed/conditional forwarding is pretty much
    >useless because of that--if they hang up at the 4th ring at best you get

    If you have caller id at home, and if most of your callers don't
    block it, you can have your computer watch for RING and after
    N rings send your cellphone an email with the caller id info. A bit
    roundabout, but an option if you can't find a better method.



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