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  1. #31
    Rod Speed
    Guest

    Re: Finding mobile serial number

    Michael <michael@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Rod Speed" <rod.speed.aaa@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:4eprplF1gam5tU1@individual.net...
    >> Ted F. wrote:
    >>
    >>> Not sure if this has been posted in here
    >>> before, it was in this mornings newspaper:

    >>
    >>> Helpful phone tip.

    >>
    >> Nope.
    >>
    >>> If you punch in STAR HASH ZERO SIX HASH ( that's *#06# )
    >>> into your mobile phone, up will come the phones serial number.

    >>
    >>> Write it down and keep it somewhere safe. Should your phone get
    >>> stolen, you can phone your service provider and give them this code.

    >>
    >>> They will then be able to block your handset, so even if
    >>> the thief changes the Sim card, the phone will be useless.

    >>
    >> The telcos dont need you to tell them that
    >> like that, they can see that in their records.


    > Weve been through this before,


    Yep, you've never ever had a ****ing clue about anything at all, ever.

    > if you are prepaid or dont make any
    > o/g calls, its not quite as easy as that


    Pity about
    http://www.amta.org.au/default.asp?id=210





    See More: Finding mobile serial number



  2. #32
    two bob
    Guest

    Re: Finding mobile serial number

    >>>> Try it, discover that changing the sim doesnt work with a blocked
    >>>> handset.
    >>>>
    >>>> That was the whole point of the most recent change, blocking the
    >>>> handset so a stolen handset cant be used by changing the sim, stupid.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any one of the govt announcements on that should make that obvious.
    >>> When mine was stolen just weeks ago changing the sim got it working on
    >>> another network ,

    >>
    >> How do you know the sim was changed, are you the one who stole it? Sounds
    >> like a slight case of fraud.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > cite ?


    Your vocabulary must be limited to that one word!

    It was stated that the phone was stolen, it was also stated that another sim
    was used in the stolen phone. How do you know this, did the thief ring and
    say "hey, I just got a new sim and it works. . . . "





  3. #33
    Spokes
    Guest

    Re: Finding mobile serial number


    Rod Speed wrote:
    > Michael <michael@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > >>>>>> How will carriers prevent unauthorised people mischievously
    > >>>>>> reporting a phone stolen and having it disconnected?

    >
    > >>>>>> (1)Process to validate identity of the customer
    > >>>>>> (2)Validation of IMEI based upon recent customer usage history
    > >>>>>> (3)Validation of IMEI based upon the mobile carrier's own inventory records

    >
    > >>>>>> Before an imei block request is sent off, the telco consultant
    > >>>>>> has to make sure they ID the customer properly as per point 1.

    >
    > >>>>> Which cannot be relied upon, as no ID is required to connect a prepaid

    >
    > >>>> IDing the customer properly aint the same
    > >>>> thing as requiring ID to connect a prepaid.

    >
    > >>> Agreed, but ID'ing a customer that has connected a service
    > >>> in false details is a bit useless in terms of the legislation

    >
    > >> Wrong. The customer will have to provide the same false details that were
    > >> supplied at connection time to achieve the legally require item (1), stupid.

    >
    > > Correct.

    >
    > > And as those details are false, this is no barrier to "malicious blocking"

    >
    > Corse there is. No way for anyone to come up with those
    > false details when maliciously blocking an IMEI of a handset
    > they didnt manage to get in an ebay auction etc, ****wit.
    >
    > > which is what we are talking about.

    >
    > You quite sure you aint one of those rocket scientist dunny cleaning ****wit children ?
    >
    > >> If you have got the IMEI off an ebay ad, you wont be able to do that.

    >
    > > ???

    >
    > > I see IMEI on ebay,.

    >
    > > I connect prepaid SIM today with false details.

    >
    > Not with that particular IMEI you cant, ****wit.
    >
    > > I call Telstra today and say I want my IMEI blocked

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > - done.

    >
    > Nope, because it fails (2) and (3) above, you stupid dunny cleaning ****wit child.
    >
    > >>>>>> Point 2 is applicable to both pre and post paids..

    >
    > >>>>> Telstra's database doesnt hold the IMEI number against a prepaid call

    >
    > >>>> Telstra flouts the law ? Then they get ****ed over by the TIO
    > >>>> when they allow a handset to be maliciously blocked, ****wit.

    >
    > >>> There is no law requiring them to keep the IMEI
    > >>> number on their system, against a prepaid call

    >
    > >> Pity about (2) at the top, you stupid pig ignorant dunny cleaning ****wit child.

    >
    > > There is no link b/w (2) at the top, and requirements
    > > for Telstra to hold IMEI numbers against prepaid calls

    >
    > Wrong, as always.
    >
    > >>>>>> Point 3 usually applies to post paid services. Although if the
    > >>>>>> customer has changed IMEIs since the start of the contract,
    > >>>>>> this point becomes irrelevant after a long period of time.

    >
    > >>>>> Is for most services

    >
    > >>>> Wrong, as always. **** all, actually.

    >
    > >>> Nope, most.

    >
    > >> Wrong as always with CONTRACTS.

    >
    > > There is a hell of a lot of customers than swap and change IMEIs.

    >
    > NOT WITH A CONTRACT, ****WIT.
    >
    > > I have about 3 or 4 services with Telstra in my name.
    > > None are used by me. The ones that have contracts,
    > > I don't use that IMEI against that service.

    >
    > You have always been, and always will
    > be, completely and utterly irrelevant.
    >
    > > Fairly typical behaviour.

    >
    > Wrong, as always.
    >
    > > If I want a new mobile, I just upgrade the next one out of contract.

    >
    > SO IT ISNT UNDER CONTRACT, ****WIT.
    >
    > >>>>>> If the consultant suspects something out of the ordinary, the
    > >>>>>> prankster is usually tripped up in the ID process, when the
    > >>>>>> consultant rightfully requests more than the minimum requirements.

    >
    > >>>>> Hardly.

    >
    > >>>> Fraid so.

    >
    > >>>>> You could drive a truck in the space b/w the ears in most CSR heads

    >
    > >>>> Telstra flouts the law ? Then they get ****ed over by the TIO

    >
    > > There is no requirement for Telstra CSRs to
    > > have brains, to "guess" at pranksters, etc etc

    >
    > There is that legal requirement listed at the top to check
    > those basics BEFORE BLOCKING AN IMEI, ****wit.
    >
    > >>> There is no requirement for a CSR to use
    > >>> their brains. You simply cant legislate that

    >
    > >> Telstra doesnt make their monkeys do what the law requires ?

    >
    > > The law doesnt require them to suspect people and do extra checks

    >
    > There is that legal requirement listed at the top to check
    > those basics BEFORE BLOCKING AN IMEI, ****wit.
    >
    > >>>>>> Accidents do happen in these situations as
    > >>>>>> well, and its not always the telco's fault.

    >
    > >>>>> Agreed

    >
    > >>>> What was being discussed was whether the telco gets to fix
    > >>>> ****ups with maliciously IMEI blocking. You stupidly pig ignorantly

    >
    > > No,

    >
    > Yep.
    >
    > > what was being discussed was whether malicious blocking could ever occur.

    >
    > Wrong, what was actually being discussed was your stupid pig
    > ignorant assertion that if telstra had blocked an IMEI in error,
    > because they had completely ****ed up the check that the
    > individual requesting the IMEI was legally entitled to block
    > that particular IMEI, YOU claimed that telstra could just tell
    > the legal owner of that IMEI to **** off when they requested
    > that Telstra unblock the blocked IMEI when the owner of the
    > IMEI had satisfied Telstra that it was their IMEI.
    >
    > > Now you are, ever so craftily ;-) trying to change the subject to
    > > "whether Telstra gets to fix ****ups with malicious blocking"

    >
    > Nope, thats what you made such a spectacular fool
    > of yourself about in the PRIOR thread, months ago.
    >
    > > I'm glad you accept my point (which is what this whole thread is about),

    >
    > I COMMENTED ON YOUR PREVIOUS PIG IGNORANT STUPIDITY
    > ABOUT TELSTRA BEING ENTITLED TO REFUSE TO UNBLOCK
    > A MALICIOUSLY BLOCKED IMEI, ****WIT.
    >
    > I said that the TIO would **** over Telstra very comprehensively
    > indeed if they were stupid enough to try that, and you stupid pig
    > ignorantly denied that, and made a VERY spectacular fool of
    > yourself indeed when you did. As always.


    Anyway, i had a situation a few days when the wrong imei had been
    blocked in error by a csr. I made a call to the right department and
    someone there unblocked it pronto. i then blocked the correct imei
    after checking call details. if there's a mistake, the customer
    shouldn't have to jump through hoops to make it right.




  4. #34
    Rod Speed
    Guest

    Re: Finding mobile serial number

    Spokes <spokesman123@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Rod Speed wrote:
    >> Michael <michael@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>>>>>> How will carriers prevent unauthorised people mischievously
    >>>>>>>> reporting a phone stolen and having it disconnected?

    >>
    >>>>>>>> (1)Process to validate identity of the customer
    >>>>>>>> (2)Validation of IMEI based upon recent customer usage history
    >>>>>>>> (3)Validation of IMEI based upon the mobile carrier's own
    >>>>>>>> inventory records

    >>
    >>>>>>>> Before an imei block request is sent off, the telco consultant
    >>>>>>>> has to make sure they ID the customer properly as per point 1.

    >>
    >>>>>>> Which cannot be relied upon, as no ID is required to connect a
    >>>>>>> prepaid

    >>
    >>>>>> IDing the customer properly aint the same
    >>>>>> thing as requiring ID to connect a prepaid.

    >>
    >>>>> Agreed, but ID'ing a customer that has connected a service
    >>>>> in false details is a bit useless in terms of the legislation

    >>
    >>>> Wrong. The customer will have to provide the same false details
    >>>> that were supplied at connection time to achieve the legally
    >>>> require item (1), stupid.

    >>
    >>> Correct.

    >>
    >>> And as those details are false, this is no barrier to "malicious
    >>> blocking"

    >>
    >> Corse there is. No way for anyone to come up with those
    >> false details when maliciously blocking an IMEI of a handset
    >> they didnt manage to get in an ebay auction etc, ****wit.
    >>
    >>> which is what we are talking about.

    >>
    >> You quite sure you aint one of those rocket scientist dunny cleaning
    >> ****wit children ?
    >>
    >>>> If you have got the IMEI off an ebay ad, you wont be able to do
    >>>> that.

    >>
    >>> ???

    >>
    >>> I see IMEI on ebay,.

    >>
    >>> I connect prepaid SIM today with false details.

    >>
    >> Not with that particular IMEI you cant, ****wit.
    >>
    >>> I call Telstra today and say I want my IMEI blocked

    >>
    >> Yes.
    >>
    >>> - done.

    >>
    >> Nope, because it fails (2) and (3) above, you stupid dunny cleaning
    >> ****wit child.
    >>
    >>>>>>>> Point 2 is applicable to both pre and post paids..

    >>
    >>>>>>> Telstra's database doesnt hold the IMEI number against a
    >>>>>>> prepaid call

    >>
    >>>>>> Telstra flouts the law ? Then they get ****ed over by the TIO
    >>>>>> when they allow a handset to be maliciously blocked, ****wit.

    >>
    >>>>> There is no law requiring them to keep the IMEI
    >>>>> number on their system, against a prepaid call

    >>
    >>>> Pity about (2) at the top, you stupid pig ignorant dunny cleaning
    >>>> ****wit child.

    >>
    >>> There is no link b/w (2) at the top, and requirements
    >>> for Telstra to hold IMEI numbers against prepaid calls

    >>
    >> Wrong, as always.
    >>
    >>>>>>>> Point 3 usually applies to post paid services. Although if the
    >>>>>>>> customer has changed IMEIs since the start of the contract,
    >>>>>>>> this point becomes irrelevant after a long period of time.

    >>
    >>>>>>> Is for most services

    >>
    >>>>>> Wrong, as always. **** all, actually.

    >>
    >>>>> Nope, most.

    >>
    >>>> Wrong as always with CONTRACTS.

    >>
    >>> There is a hell of a lot of customers than swap and change IMEIs.

    >>
    >> NOT WITH A CONTRACT, ****WIT.
    >>
    >>> I have about 3 or 4 services with Telstra in my name.
    >>> None are used by me. The ones that have contracts,
    >>> I don't use that IMEI against that service.

    >>
    >> You have always been, and always will
    >> be, completely and utterly irrelevant.
    >>
    >>> Fairly typical behaviour.

    >>
    >> Wrong, as always.
    >>
    >>> If I want a new mobile, I just upgrade the next one out of contract.

    >>
    >> SO IT ISNT UNDER CONTRACT, ****WIT.
    >>
    >>>>>>>> If the consultant suspects something out of the ordinary, the
    >>>>>>>> prankster is usually tripped up in the ID process, when the
    >>>>>>>> consultant rightfully requests more than the minimum
    >>>>>>>> requirements.

    >>
    >>>>>>> Hardly.

    >>
    >>>>>> Fraid so.

    >>
    >>>>>>> You could drive a truck in the space b/w the ears in most CSR
    >>>>>>> heads

    >>
    >>>>>> Telstra flouts the law ? Then they get ****ed over by the TIO

    >>
    >>> There is no requirement for Telstra CSRs to
    >>> have brains, to "guess" at pranksters, etc etc

    >>
    >> There is that legal requirement listed at the top to check
    >> those basics BEFORE BLOCKING AN IMEI, ****wit.
    >>
    >>>>> There is no requirement for a CSR to use
    >>>>> their brains. You simply cant legislate that

    >>
    >>>> Telstra doesnt make their monkeys do what the law requires ?

    >>
    >>> The law doesnt require them to suspect people and do extra checks

    >>
    >> There is that legal requirement listed at the top to check
    >> those basics BEFORE BLOCKING AN IMEI, ****wit.
    >>
    >>>>>>>> Accidents do happen in these situations as
    >>>>>>>> well, and its not always the telco's fault.

    >>
    >>>>>>> Agreed

    >>
    >>>>>> What was being discussed was whether the telco gets to fix
    >>>>>> ****ups with maliciously IMEI blocking. You stupidly pig
    >>>>>> ignorantly

    >>
    >>> No,

    >>
    >> Yep.
    >>
    >>> what was being discussed was whether malicious blocking could ever
    >>> occur.

    >>
    >> Wrong, what was actually being discussed was your stupid pig
    >> ignorant assertion that if telstra had blocked an IMEI in error,
    >> because they had completely ****ed up the check that the
    >> individual requesting the IMEI was legally entitled to block
    >> that particular IMEI, YOU claimed that telstra could just tell
    >> the legal owner of that IMEI to **** off when they requested
    >> that Telstra unblock the blocked IMEI when the owner of the
    >> IMEI had satisfied Telstra that it was their IMEI.
    >>
    >>> Now you are, ever so craftily ;-) trying to change the subject to
    >>> "whether Telstra gets to fix ****ups with malicious blocking"

    >>
    >> Nope, thats what you made such a spectacular fool
    >> of yourself about in the PRIOR thread, months ago.
    >>
    >>> I'm glad you accept my point (which is what this whole thread is
    >>> about),

    >>
    >> I COMMENTED ON YOUR PREVIOUS PIG IGNORANT STUPIDITY
    >> ABOUT TELSTRA BEING ENTITLED TO REFUSE TO UNBLOCK
    >> A MALICIOUSLY BLOCKED IMEI, ****WIT.
    >>
    >> I said that the TIO would **** over Telstra very comprehensively
    >> indeed if they were stupid enough to try that, and you stupid pig
    >> ignorantly denied that, and made a VERY spectacular fool of
    >> yourself indeed when you did. As always.

    >
    > Anyway, i had a situation a few days when the wrong imei had been
    > blocked in error by a csr. I made a call to the right department and
    > someone there unblocked it pronto. i then blocked the correct imei
    > after checking call details. if there's a mistake, the customer
    > shouldn't have to jump through hoops to make it right.


    Precisely. Silly little Mikey has always had his head completely up
    his arse on this one and everything else he has ever commented on.

    That why even telstra only lets him clean the dunnys.





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