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  1. #1
    SMS
    Guest
    See "http://www.itnews.com.au/newsstory.aspx?CIaNID=49296&src=site-marq"

    Sprint leads Verizon by 41Ę in data ARPU.

    Verizon passed Cingular in retail subscribers by half a million.
    "Verizon became the new market leader in terms of total direct retail
    subscribers/customers, with a total of 56.8 million, against 56.3
    million for Cingular," said IDC's Julien Blin in a statement.

    Cingular still leads in subscribers when you include wholesale MVNO
    customers that sell under a variety of brands.




    See More: Sprint Leads in data ARPU, Verizon passes Cingular in Subscribers,according to IDC Report




  2. #2
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: Sprint Leads in data ARPU, Verizon passes Cingular in Subscribers, according to IDC Report

    On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 11:20:48 -0700, SMS <[email protected]>
    wrote in <[email protected]>:

    >See "http://www.itnews.com.au/newsstory.aspx?CIaNID=49296&src=site-marq"
    >
    >Sprint leads Verizon by 41Ę in data ARPU.


    Thanks to Nextel.

    >Verizon passed Cingular in retail subscribers by half a million.


    That's just a guess. Only time will tell whether it's true or not.

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  3. #3
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: Sprint Leads in data ARPU, Verizon passes Cingular in Subscribers, according to IDC Report

    On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 11:20:48 -0700, SMS <[email protected]>
    wrote in <[email protected]>:

    >[SNIP]


    Reality check:

    Sprint still struggling to make Nextel merger work
    Revenue expected to remain flat and big layoffs
    coming for wireless carrier.
    By Denise Pappalardo, NetworkWorld.com, 01/09/07
    <http://www.networkworld.com/news/2007/010907-sprint-nextel-earnings.html>

    The honeymoon period is clearly over for Sprint and Nextel. Their $36
    billion marriage at the end of 2005 was supposed to result in a
    wireless powerhouse with strong average revenue per user (ARPU). But
    Sprint Nextel Monday said its earnings for 2007 will fall below
    earlier expectation; its revenue will be flat and that it will lay
    off 5,000 employees to cut costs.

    ....

    Industry watchers say the carrier's ARPU sipped even further in the
    fourth quarter after three consecutive months of decline, yet strong
    ARPU was one of the reasons Sprint bought Nextel.

    Back in 2004, when the merger was proposed, Nextelís ARPU was $69
    while Sprintís was $63, Verizonís $51.58 and Cingularís $49.78. But
    Sprint Nextel hasnít been able to maintain Nextelís ARPU let alone
    Sprint's. The combined company reported ARPU of $61 in the third
    quarter.

    On the other hand, Verizon and Cingularís figures have remained
    steady. Verizon reported ARPU of $50.59 and Cingular reported ARPU of
    $49.76 during the same period.

    In an attempt to cut expenses, Sprint Nextel is slashing its
    workforce to 59,600, about an 8% reduction expected to happen mostly
    this quarter.

    Trimming its payroll is one way itís attempting to fix its financial
    problems, but the company clearly is betting its future on wireless
    broadband services, namely EV-DO Revision A and WiMAX.

    The company says its capital expenditures will be about $8.5 billion
    in 2007, $1.4 billion more than in 2006. The majority of that will be
    spent on expanding its wireless broadband networks.

    But the companyís laser focus on wireless broadband seems to be
    hurting the carrier in the short term.

    Some have speculated that the company has not maintained the Nextel
    network, services or customer service. Reports say that the majority
    of customers leaving Sprint stem from the Nextel side of the house,
    hence the loss of Nextelís high ARPU.

    [MORE]

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  4. #4
    james g. keegan jr.
    Guest

    Re: Sprint Leads in data ARPU, Verizon passes Cingular in Subscribers, according to IDC Report

    In article <[email protected]>,
    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 11:20:48 -0700, SMS <[email protected]>
    > wrote in <[email protected]>:
    >
    > >[SNIP]

    >
    > Reality check:


    not reality, john, what you did was denial.

    [...]



  5. #5
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: Sprint Leads in data ARPU, Verizon passes Cingular in Subscribers, according to IDC Report

    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 11:20:48 -0700, SMS <[email protected]>
    > wrote in <[email protected]>:
    >
    >>[SNIP]

    >
    > Reality check:
    >
    > Sprint still struggling to make Nextel merger work
    > Revenue expected to remain flat and big layoffs
    > coming for wireless carrier.
    > By Denise Pappalardo, NetworkWorld.com, 01/09/07
    > <http://www.networkworld.com/news/200...el-earnings.ht
    > ml>
    >


    A four month old article? May be you should take your head out of your ass
    and look at more recent events.



  6. #6
    John Navas
    Guest

    Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    <http://www.thestreet.com/_htmlbtb/smallbusinesstech/smallbusinesstech/10348860.html>

    Sprint's condition looks so dismal that an all-or-nothing bet on an
    unproven wireless technology is actually shaping up as a bright spot.

    Tuning out the static surrounding its repeated stumbles, Sprint late
    last month announced a major expansion of its wireless broadband
    project. After originally targeting Chicago and Baltimore, Sprint now
    says it will launch the so-called 4G service in 17 additional cities
    by the end of 2008.

    Sprint has budgeted about $2.75 billion for the effort, effectively
    doubling down on a not-yet-standardized wireless format known as
    mobile Worldwide Interoperability of Microwave Access, or WiMax.
    Theoretically, the new network will soon deliver the sort of speedy
    mobile Internet connections that people now enjoy at their desktops.
    ....
    "WiMax is our future," says one Sprint insider who is involved with
    the decision. "There's no margin for error. It's not like we can say
    'we gave it our best effort' and then move on."

    [MORE]

    Sprint loses out on major contract
    <http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-telecom30mar30,1,3918367.story?coll=la-headlines-business>

    Dealing a significant blow to Sprint Nextel Corp., the government
    Thursday awarded the largest-ever federal telecommunications contract
    -- a 10-year deal worth as much as $48 billion -- to Sprint rivals
    AT&T, Qwest Communications and Verizon.
    ....
    The GSA announcement was a serious loss for Sprint Nextel, analysts
    said, because the Reston, Va.-based company has been providing
    telecom services to the federal government for nearly 20 years.

    This year, Sprint announced thousands of job cuts amid service
    troubles, a dwindling customer base and difficulty assimilating
    Nextel Communications, which it acquired in 2004. Sprint shares are
    down about 20% from a year ago and the company is forecasting
    near-flat operating revenue and earnings this year.

    "It's terrible for Sprint," said technology consultant Warren Suss of
    Jenkintown, Pa. "The federal government was Sprint's first major
    customer since the company started."

    GSA officials would not say why Sprint lost out.

    [MORE]

    Sprint Runs Out of Appeal
    <http://www.thestreet.com/p/_rmct/rmoney/jimcramerblog/10331568.html>

    Sprint was a pure takeover target. That's why people owned it. No
    other reason. There was no earnings potential, none as the company
    pretty much telegraphed. You could bank on a disappointment, but
    people couldn't resist it. They believed that no matter how bad it
    was, they could withstand the pain because of the buyout potential.

    Of course, as with the Gap, as with Home Depot, when you speculate on
    this nonsense you have a really terrible risk/reward. Sure, Sprint
    could get a takeover bid, but it won't come from $20. It might not
    even come from $17.

    Fifteen feels more like it.

    Nobody can resist speculating on crummy companies. I just have to
    warn you that any potential buyers of this company know that things
    are crummy there and they aren't interested, either.

    The fundamentals of any company must be good enough that you will
    want to buy more if there is a disappointment. It's pretty clear
    today that Sprint owners want out. That's what you get when you make
    a bet on unsound merchandise.

    Caveat emptor.

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  7. #7
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    What is the reason that Sprint lost the contract? Does anyone have any
    information? Navas, do you know anything?


    "John Navas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    > <http://www.thestreet.com/_htmlbtb/smallbusinesstech/smallbusinesstech/10348860.html>
    >
    > Sprint's condition looks so dismal that an all-or-nothing bet on an
    > unproven wireless technology is actually shaping up as a bright spot.
    >
    > Tuning out the static surrounding its repeated stumbles, Sprint late
    > last month announced a major expansion of its wireless broadband
    > project. After originally targeting Chicago and Baltimore, Sprint now
    > says it will launch the so-called 4G service in 17 additional cities
    > by the end of 2008.
    >
    > Sprint has budgeted about $2.75 billion for the effort, effectively
    > doubling down on a not-yet-standardized wireless format known as
    > mobile Worldwide Interoperability of Microwave Access, or WiMax.
    > Theoretically, the new network will soon deliver the sort of speedy
    > mobile Internet connections that people now enjoy at their desktops.
    > ...
    > "WiMax is our future," says one Sprint insider who is involved with
    > the decision. "There's no margin for error. It's not like we can say
    > 'we gave it our best effort' and then move on."
    >
    > [MORE]
    >
    > Sprint loses out on major contract
    > <http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-telecom30mar30,1,3918367.story?coll=la-headlines-business>
    >
    > Dealing a significant blow to Sprint Nextel Corp., the government
    > Thursday awarded the largest-ever federal telecommunications contract
    > -- a 10-year deal worth as much as $48 billion -- to Sprint rivals
    > AT&T, Qwest Communications and Verizon.
    > ...
    > The GSA announcement was a serious loss for Sprint Nextel, analysts
    > said, because the Reston, Va.-based company has been providing
    > telecom services to the federal government for nearly 20 years.
    >
    > This year, Sprint announced thousands of job cuts amid service
    > troubles, a dwindling customer base and difficulty assimilating
    > Nextel Communications, which it acquired in 2004. Sprint shares are
    > down about 20% from a year ago and the company is forecasting
    > near-flat operating revenue and earnings this year.
    >
    > "It's terrible for Sprint," said technology consultant Warren Suss of
    > Jenkintown, Pa. "The federal government was Sprint's first major
    > customer since the company started."
    >
    > GSA officials would not say why Sprint lost out.
    >
    > [MORE]
    >
    > Sprint Runs Out of Appeal
    > <http://www.thestreet.com/p/_rmct/rmoney/jimcramerblog/10331568.html>
    >
    > Sprint was a pure takeover target. That's why people owned it. No
    > other reason. There was no earnings potential, none as the company
    > pretty much telegraphed. You could bank on a disappointment, but
    > people couldn't resist it. They believed that no matter how bad it
    > was, they could withstand the pain because of the buyout potential.
    >
    > Of course, as with the Gap, as with Home Depot, when you speculate on
    > this nonsense you have a really terrible risk/reward. Sure, Sprint
    > could get a takeover bid, but it won't come from $20. It might not
    > even come from $17.
    >
    > Fifteen feels more like it.
    >
    > Nobody can resist speculating on crummy companies. I just have to
    > warn you that any potential buyers of this company know that things
    > are crummy there and they aren't interested, either.
    >
    > The fundamentals of any company must be good enough that you will
    > want to buy more if there is a disappointment. It's pretty clear
    > today that Sprint owners want out. That's what you get when you make
    > a bet on unsound merchandise.
    >
    > Caveat emptor.
    >
    > --
    > Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    > John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>






  8. #8
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/29/AR2007032901061.html?nav=rss_technology/techpolicy>

    Although the contract is a big win for AT&T, Qwest and Verizon,
    industry analysts said, it is a devastating blow for Sprint, which
    has provided services under the government's previous two major
    telecom contracts, spanning two decades.

    "This doesn't just mean a loss of federal business -- this will
    marginalize Sprint and really narrow their scope to a niche wireless
    contractor versus a broad carrier," said Warren Suss, a telecom
    analyst for Suss Consulting in Jenkintown, Pa. "The fact that they
    didn't make the cut here means that from a pricing and technological
    point of view, they had a hard time providing services across the
    board."

    Other analysts speculated that the government was wary of doing
    business with Sprint, which has been losing subscribers and whose
    stock has lost about 20 percent of its value, adjusted for dividends
    and splits, since its 2005 merger with Nextel. William E. Kennard,
    former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, was brought
    on to Sprint's board of directors after the merger, in part to help
    bolster the company's federal presence. He resigned from his post
    three weeks ago -- an early sign, some say, that Sprint was facing
    defeat.

    [MORE]

    <http://go.sosd.com/adapt/servlet/nrp?cid=RIM&cmd=sty&pgn=1&ino=1053510&cat=Technology>

    While current GSA officials would not say why Sprint lost out, Bob
    Woods, a former official at the agency who now works as a consultant,
    surmised that Sprint could not meet the low prices of its
    competitors. Woods estimated that Sprint could lose roughly $200
    million to $250 million annually in existing government business.

    Executives from Sprint plan to meet with GSA officials next week to
    discuss why their contract proposal fell short, and the company will
    decide afterwards whether to file a protest, spokeswoman Sukhi Sahni
    said in an e-mail.

    [MORE]

    Sprint Nextel will not protest contract
    <http://www.kansascity.com/438/story/62087.html>

    Sprint Nextel Corp., the only losing bidder among four companies
    vying for a government telecommunications contract worth up to $48
    billion, said Friday it has decided not to protest last week's
    decision.

    The company met with the General Service Administration on Wednesday
    for a "debriefing" on why they weren't chosen for the 10-year
    "Networx Universal" contract.
    ....
    Sprint, which has been supplying telecom services to the government
    for the last 18 years, lost out to Verizon Communications Inc., AT&T
    Inc. and Qwest Communications International Inc. for the Universal
    contract. As a result, Sprint will not be able to compete for
    individual agency business for the next decade.

    [MORE]

    <http://svextra.com/blogs/gmsv/2007/03/big_telecom_party_in_dc_sprints_invitation_lost_in_the_mail.html>

    The blow to Sprint, which had participated in providing telecom
    services to the federal government for nearly 20 years, was a
    crusher. The company has been leaking customers and jobs since
    acquiring Nextel in 2005, and it had already announced plans to lay
    off 5,000 workers this year as sales lagged. Asked why Sprint was
    sent home, John Johnson of the GPA would say only, "The three
    awardees best meet our needs." Sprint officials said they would press
    the feds for a more detailed explanation next week before deciding
    whether to protest its exclusion. [MORE]


    On Mon, 9 Apr 2007 11:32:22 -0700, "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]>
    wrote in <[email protected]>:

    >What is the reason that Sprint lost the contract? Does anyone have any
    >information? Navas, do you know anything?
    >
    >
    >"John Navas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news[email protected]
    >> <http://www.thestreet.com/_htmlbtb/smallbusinesstech/smallbusinesstech/10348860.html>
    >>
    >> Sprint's condition looks so dismal that an all-or-nothing bet on an
    >> unproven wireless technology is actually shaping up as a bright spot.
    >>
    >> Tuning out the static surrounding its repeated stumbles, Sprint late
    >> last month announced a major expansion of its wireless broadband
    >> project. After originally targeting Chicago and Baltimore, Sprint now
    >> says it will launch the so-called 4G service in 17 additional cities
    >> by the end of 2008.
    >>
    >> Sprint has budgeted about $2.75 billion for the effort, effectively
    >> doubling down on a not-yet-standardized wireless format known as
    >> mobile Worldwide Interoperability of Microwave Access, or WiMax.
    >> Theoretically, the new network will soon deliver the sort of speedy
    >> mobile Internet connections that people now enjoy at their desktops.
    >> ...
    >> "WiMax is our future," says one Sprint insider who is involved with
    >> the decision. "There's no margin for error. It's not like we can say
    >> 'we gave it our best effort' and then move on."
    >>
    >> [MORE]
    >>
    >> Sprint loses out on major contract
    >> <http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-telecom30mar30,1,3918367.story?coll=la-headlines-business>
    >>
    >> Dealing a significant blow to Sprint Nextel Corp., the government
    >> Thursday awarded the largest-ever federal telecommunications contract
    >> -- a 10-year deal worth as much as $48 billion -- to Sprint rivals
    >> AT&T, Qwest Communications and Verizon.
    >> ...
    >> The GSA announcement was a serious loss for Sprint Nextel, analysts
    >> said, because the Reston, Va.-based company has been providing
    >> telecom services to the federal government for nearly 20 years.
    >>
    >> This year, Sprint announced thousands of job cuts amid service
    >> troubles, a dwindling customer base and difficulty assimilating
    >> Nextel Communications, which it acquired in 2004. Sprint shares are
    >> down about 20% from a year ago and the company is forecasting
    >> near-flat operating revenue and earnings this year.
    >>
    >> "It's terrible for Sprint," said technology consultant Warren Suss of
    >> Jenkintown, Pa. "The federal government was Sprint's first major
    >> customer since the company started."
    >>
    >> GSA officials would not say why Sprint lost out.
    >>
    >> [MORE]
    >>
    >> Sprint Runs Out of Appeal
    >> <http://www.thestreet.com/p/_rmct/rmoney/jimcramerblog/10331568.html>
    >>
    >> Sprint was a pure takeover target. That's why people owned it. No
    >> other reason. There was no earnings potential, none as the company
    >> pretty much telegraphed. You could bank on a disappointment, but
    >> people couldn't resist it. They believed that no matter how bad it
    >> was, they could withstand the pain because of the buyout potential.
    >>
    >> Of course, as with the Gap, as with Home Depot, when you speculate on
    >> this nonsense you have a really terrible risk/reward. Sure, Sprint
    >> could get a takeover bid, but it won't come from $20. It might not
    >> even come from $17.
    >>
    >> Fifteen feels more like it.
    >>
    >> Nobody can resist speculating on crummy companies. I just have to
    >> warn you that any potential buyers of this company know that things
    >> are crummy there and they aren't interested, either.
    >>
    >> The fundamentals of any company must be good enough that you will
    >> want to buy more if there is a disappointment. It's pretty clear
    >> today that Sprint owners want out. That's what you get when you make
    >> a bet on unsound merchandise.
    >>
    >> Caveat emptor.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    >> John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>

    >


    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  9. #9
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote in
    news[email protected]:

    > <http://www.thestreet.com/_htmlbtb/sm...lbusinesstech/
    > 10348860.html>
    >


    Great article at face value but a few things stand out- I spotted at least
    three major inaccuracies and no comparative mention of Cingular's merger
    woes.




  10. #10
    Larry
    Guest

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote in
    news[email protected]:

    > Sprint has budgeted about $2.75 billion for the effort, effectively
    > doubling down on a not-yet-standardized wireless format known as
    > mobile Worldwide Interoperability of Microwave Access, or WiMax.
    > Theoretically, the new network will soon deliver the sort of speedy
    > mobile Internet connections that people now enjoy at their desktops.
    > ...
    >


    So, John, do you think the archaic audio cellphone systems, like CDMA,
    will continue, even though the planet is being dragged, kicking and
    screaming if necessary, into a new data age?

    The key to WiMax is the "Worldwide Interoperability" part. Everyone on
    the SAME system across the planet. Your WiMax VoIP phone and WiMax
    computer will work in ANY country on ANY system. That's the aim, much,
    I'm sure, to the dismay of the maze of wireless phone carriers in the
    USA/Canada.

    No, I believe Sprint is simply placing themselves at the head of the line
    in the WiMax transition. Instead of this multiple, half-assed, parallel
    system of cellular/PCS phone nonsense America is today of non-cooperating
    competitors, who only briefly coordinate their inadequacies with other
    carriers on their particular data scheme, then refuse to cooperate,
    dispite their customers having all these holes. WiMax carriers will all
    be resellers of the SAME system, each a part of the whole, as cellular
    should have been by force of law from its inception.

    Those lagging behind, trying to hold onto their little archaic fiefdoms,
    as now, will find themselves losing revenues, as the worldwide WiMax
    becomes a reality. The sooner the better for all of us...er,
    ah...customers, that is....(c;

    Larry
    --



  11. #11
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    On Wed, 11 Apr 2007 01:47:36 +0000, Larry <[email protected]> wrote in
    <[email protected]>:

    >John Navas <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news[email protected]:
    >
    >> Sprint has budgeted about $2.75 billion for the effort, effectively
    >> doubling down on a not-yet-standardized wireless format known as
    >> mobile Worldwide Interoperability of Microwave Access, or WiMax.
    >> Theoretically, the new network will soon deliver the sort of speedy
    >> mobile Internet connections that people now enjoy at their desktops.
    >> ...


    >So, John, do you think the archaic audio cellphone systems, like CDMA,


    CDMA2000.

    >will continue, even though the planet is being dragged, kicking and
    >screaming if necessary, into a new data age?


    Yes.

    >The key to WiMax is the "Worldwide Interoperability" part. Everyone on
    >the SAME system across the planet. Your WiMax VoIP phone and WiMax
    >computer will work in ANY country on ANY system. That's the aim, much,
    >I'm sure, to the dismay of the maze of wireless phone carriers in the
    >USA/Canada.


    Unfortunately, that's not what's actually happening.

    >No, I believe Sprint is simply placing themselves at the head of the line
    >in the WiMax transition.


    I think Sprint is making a very big and very risky bet.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  12. #12
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:


    >
    >>The key to WiMax is the "Worldwide Interoperability" part. Everyone
    >>on the SAME system across the planet. Your WiMax VoIP phone and WiMax
    >>computer will work in ANY country on ANY system. That's the aim,
    >>much, I'm sure, to the dismay of the maze of wireless phone carriers
    >>in the USA/Canada.

    >
    > Unfortunately, that's not what's actually happening.



    Actually that is exactly what is happening, which you would know if you had
    a clue about the subject.

    >
    >>No, I believe Sprint is simply placing themselves at the head of the
    >>line in the WiMax transition.

    >
    > I think Sprint is making a very big and very risky bet.
    >


    I think you don't understand anything about cellular, at least not more
    than the average consumer.



  13. #13

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    On Apr 9, 2:12 pm, John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    > <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/29/AR200...>
    >
    > Although the contract is a big win for AT&T, Qwest and Verizon,
    > industry analysts said, it is a devastating blow for Sprint, which
    > has provided services under the government's previous two major
    > telecom contracts, spanning two decades.


    Joey Nachoes was a visionary, FREE JOEY !! JG





  14. #14
    Yura
    Guest

    Re: Sprint's Big Pipe Dream

    John Navas wrote:
    > <http://www.thestreet.com/_htmlbtb/smallbusinesstech/smallbusinesstech/10348860.html>

    WELL.. It' looks like the Cocksucker NAVAS is back. And sucking harder
    than ever. Hey NAVAS, hows it feel to have cocksuckers cramp in your anus?



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