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  1. #1
    4phun
    Guest
    On Nov 11, 1:22*am, Nigel <[email protected]> wrote:
    > in article
    > [email protected]m, 4phun at
    > [email protected] wrote on 11/11/08 1:54 PM:
    >
    >
    >
    > > 11/10/08 - Motorola Razr Finally Dethroned!

    >
    > > IPhone Crowned Top Cell Phone In U.S.
    > > and what is even more Amazing Only AT&T Has It!

    >
    > > By Antone Gonsalves
    > > InformationWeek
    > > November 10, 2008 08:00 PM

    >
    > > Apple's iPhone 3G was the best-selling mobile phone in the United
    > > States in the third quarter, surpassing former champion theMotorola
    > > (NYSE: MOT) Razr, which fell to second place, a market research firm
    > > said Monday.

    >
    > > Nevertheless, the iPhone's popularity among U.S. consumers failed to
    > > lift the overall market. Handset purchases overall declined 15% from
    > > the same period a year ago to 32 million units, the NPD Group said.
    > > Handset revenue fell 10% to $2.9 billion, even though the average
    > > selling price rose 6% to $88.

    >
    > > The Razr was ranked the top-selling consumer handset for 12
    > > consecutive quarters. The iPhone's ascension represented a "watershed
    > > shift in handset design from fashion to fashionable functionality,"
    > > NPD analyst Ross Rubin said in a statement.

    >
    > >http://www.informationweek.com/news/...ne/showArticle....
    > > icleID=212001650

    >
    > > This report also ran on NPR's
    > > All Things Considered 11/10/08

    >
    > > Poor Verizon, Sprint -
    > > No iPhone for you, keep pushing those Razrs ;>)

    >
    > > On Nov 9, 12:35*am, 4phun <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> MORE GOOD NEWS FOR IPHONE USERS 11/08/08

    >
    > >> YOUR IPHONE IS FAR MORE RELIABLE

    >
    > >> SquareTrade Study: iPhones more reliable than BlackBerry, Treo

    >
    > >>http://www.blogcdn.com/www.tuaw.com/...nctionsmartpho....

    >
    > >> The report, titled "iPhone More Reliable than BlackBerry, One Year
    > >> In", analyzes failure rates for more than 15,000 new cell phones
    > >> covered by SquareTrade warranties. SquareTrade found that after one
    > >> year of ownership, iPhone owners were half as likely as BlackBerry
    > >> owners to have a phone failure, and one-third as likely as Treo
    > >> owners.

    >
    > >> EVEN MORE BREAKING GOOD NEWS FOR IPHONE

    >
    > >> ANY WEBSITE CAN NOW BE INSTANTLY
    > >> IPHONIZEDhttp://digg.com/tech_news/HOW_TO_Instantly_iPhone_ize_Your_Website

    >
    > >> British developer Jon Wheatley let loose an awesome little tool today:
    > >> Intersquash lets you convert any website into an iPhone siteŠ
    > >> instantly.

    >
    > >> Video at link just click through DIGG

    >
    > No surprise - I hated my RAZR. *Funny to think about the internet experience
    > on the RAZR compared to the iPhone - talk about the dark ages. *Long live
    > the iphone (until someone makes something even better at least).
    >
    > Nigel


    American Airlines first to offer iPhone mobile boarding passes

    In what will no doubt be the first among several who will offer this
    (it’s about time!), American Airlines is now the first airline to
    officially offer mobile boarding passes at a few airports but it
    shouldn’t take long for this to be available at all airports, across
    all airlines.

    For those who travel frequently, it’s obviously more convenient to
    show your iPhone screen rather than looking in your backpack for the
    right piece of paper.

    Is this the wave of the future? More than likely. American Airlines
    started to make this mobile boarding pass option available to people
    who travel from Chicago O’Hare Airport, LAX, and John Wayne Airport,
    and it is leading the way for all other airlines. More airlines will
    probably follow in the near future, and it’s yet another example of
    the iPhone’s penetration into the everyday consciousness of business.

    This is one of several recent events that could give the iPhone a
    commanding lead far over any other cell phone trying to catch Apple.



    See More: More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobileboarding passes




  2. #2
    nospam
    Guest

    Re: More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobile boarding passes

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    4phun <[email protected]> wrote:

    > American Airlines first to offer iPhone mobile boarding passes


    actually they aren't the first. continental has had it for a while and
    it isn't just an iphone either.

    > For those who travel frequently, itís obviously more convenient to
    > show your iPhone screen rather than looking in your backpack for the
    > right piece of paper.


    it's much easier to show a piece of paper than it is to deal with a
    phone which is probably already in a bag for going through the x-ray
    machine (can't have it on your person for the metal detector).

    the only real advantage is on line check in while traveling and not
    having access to a printer, although even that isn't a big deal since
    the kiosk will reprint it.

    > This is one of several recent events that could give the iPhone a
    > commanding lead far over any other cell phone trying to catch Apple.


    it's nothing new and it's not iphone specific. long ago, prior to the
    requirement to have a boarding pass to enter the secure area, it was
    possible to check in via any phone and then show a gold/platinum card
    at the gate which the gate agent inserted into the machine and
    retrieved the info and printed a boarding pass.



  3. #3
    Ron
    Guest

    Re: More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobile boarding passes

    Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
    already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???

    http://www.continental.com/web/en-US...romoCode=A4802



  4. #4
    nospam
    Guest

    Re: More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobile boarding passes

    In article <[email protected]>, Ron
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
    > already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???


    they don't, nor do they mention iphones

    <http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/081113/american_airlines_boarding_passes.html>



  5. #5
    Ron
    Guest

    Re: More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobile boarding passes

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 04:43:29 -0500, nospam <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Ron
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
    >> already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???

    >
    >they don't, nor do they mention iphones
    >
    ><http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/081113/american_airlines_boarding_passes.html>



    Your snipping the link proving Continental did it last year in 2007,
    doesnt make AA first.

    http://www.continental.com/web/en-US...romoCode=A4802



  6. #6
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobile boarding passes


    "Ron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 04:43:29 -0500, nospam <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, Ron
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
    >>> already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???

    >>
    >>they don't, nor do they mention iphones
    >>
    >><http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/081113/american_airlines_boarding_passes.html>

    >
    >
    > Your snipping the link proving Continental did it last year in 2007,
    > doesnt make AA first.
    >
    > http://www.continental.com/web/en-US...romoCode=A4802


    Um, he was SUPPORTING your position, not arguing with you! He merely
    pointed out that 4phun's original post was, like most of his rantings,
    exaggerated, and provided a link showing that AA's press release did NOT
    claim they were first (as 4phun suggested) nor did it say it was for iPhones
    only (also as 4phun suggested.)

    I guess you're just so used to people arguing with you that you can't
    recognize support when you see it!








  7. #7
    nospam
    Guest

    Re: More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobile boarding passes

    In article <[email protected]>, Ron
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Your snipping the link proving Continental did it last year in 2007,
    > doesnt make AA first.


    i *said* aa wasn't first, so there was no need to keep the link, and in
    my other reply, i specifically mentioned continental doing it before
    aa. i also said it had nothing to do with iphones and actually sounds
    like more of a pain than using a piece of paper. sometimes low tech is
    the best solution.



  8. #8
    iPhone 3Gold
    Guest

    Re: News for IPhone - Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines ThatListen

    November 18, 2008, 12:30 am
    Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines That Listen
    By John Markoff

    How do you talk to a search engine? In Googlish, of course.

    Google’s new speech recognition service for the iPhone, which I wrote
    about last week and which was released on Monday, understands you most
    accurately when you speak to it just the way you enter queries into
    the Google search box. That makes sense, because the system’s accuracy
    comes from the billions and billions of typed queries that Google has
    recorded over the years.
    Google’s voice search software for iPhones. (Peter DaSilva for The New
    York Times)

    So don’t bother with polite formalisms like “What is the best pizza
    restaurant in San Francisco?” Simply say “best pizza restaurant San
    Francisco.”

    After all, you’re talking to a dumb machine — or perhaps several,
    distributed across multiple states.

    The accuracy is far from 100 percent, and probably not even 95 percent
    (Google execs demurred when I asked if they had any meaningful
    accuracy statistics). My experience is that it captures your voice
    query substantially more than half the time, and that in itself is a
    revelation. It also makes the usual sampling of funny mistakes. (My
    favorite was my inability to get it to recognize “Camp Unalayee,”
    which I attended as a teenager. It would usually respond “Camp
    Ukulele.” But heck, unalayee is a Cherokee word that means “place of
    friends,” and ukulele is in the dictionary.)

    Yet after five days of using the service it still seems better than
    any speech recognition system I have used to date. It may even signify
    an inflection point — speech recognition that is more useful than
    typing.

    I was initially intrigued by the Google Mobile App because I have been
    following the progress of speech recognition research since the early
    1980s. Progress in this field feels like watching paint dry. Yet the
    industry’s visionaries have been unanimous in saying that we will talk
    to machines — and they will understand us — someday.

    It was probably in 1983 that researchers at SRI International
    demonstrated how they could control simulated battleships with voice
    commands (“go left,” “go right,” “stop,” that sort of thing).
    Evolution has been slow because it turns out that recognizing speech
    is a really, really hard problem. There are all the complexities of
    language, plus accents and background noise.

    In the past decade, however, progress has accelerated. The stakes are
    very high and there are a number of big and small players. The search
    giants Google, Microsoft and Yahoo all believe speech recognition is a
    prerequisite for the era of mobile computing. And there are lots of
    others including I.B.M., Nuance and Vlingo that are developing speech
    technology.

    Although Microsoft hasn’t dominated in this area yet, the company has
    been investing heavily in research in the field going back to the
    1980s. Last year it spent close to $1 billion to acquire Tellme
    Networks, a company based in Silicon Valley that supplies speech
    recognition for the phone directory and operator assistance market.

    “You want to be able to interact with your phone just like you would
    with your mom or friends,” said Dariusz Paczuski, senior director for
    consumer services at Tellme. “Voice is a great interface and it can
    simplify interactions more than anything.”

    Everyone agrees that in mobile applications, speech is the obvious
    user interface. Whether it’s on a BlackBerry, an Android phone or an
    iPhone, typing will always be error-prone and frustrating.

    If one company makes a major breakthrough in voice, it is potentially
    a major threat to its rivals, because a “speech interface” could
    potentially allow one company to simply take over a handheld device
    developed by another company.

    For some time we seem to have been stuck at the stage where speech
    recognition works, but just sort of. Perhaps we are at a moment like
    the one when A.T.M.’s were first introduced. At first most people said
    they preferred interacting with a human bank teller. Then, overnight
    it seemed, everyone realized that the bank teller relationship wasn’t
    all it was cracked up to be. Now most of us never set foot inside a
    bank. How long before people find that it is more efficient to deal
    with a robot on the phone than a human?

    Enough with the future-gazing. Right now there is something compelling
    about saying “backpacking trails Trinity Alps California,” and being
    taken directly to a Web site listing all of the best ones.

    If you’ve tried out voice searching with the Google Mobile App for
    iPhone, leave a comment and let us know how it went.





  9. #9
    iPhone 3Gold
    Guest

    Re: News for IPhone - Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines ThatListen

    On Nov 18, 11:11*am, iPhone 3Gold <[email protected]> wrote:
    > November 18, 2008, 12:30 am
    > Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines That Listen
    > By John Markoff
    >
    > How do you talk to a search engine? In Googlish, of course.
    >
    > Google’s new speech recognition service for the iPhone, which I wrote
    > about last week and which was released on Monday, understands you most
    > accurately when you speak to it just the way you enter queries into
    > the Google search box. That makes sense, because the system’s accuracy
    > comes from the billions and billions of typed queries that Google has
    > recorded over the years.
    > Google’s voice search software for iPhones. (Peter DaSilva for The New
    > York Times)
    >
    > So don’t bother with polite formalisms like “What is the best pizza
    > restaurant in San Francisco?” Simply say “best pizza restaurant San
    > Francisco.”
    >
    > After all, you’re talking to a dumb machine — or perhaps several,
    > distributed across multiple states.
    >
    > The accuracy is far from 100 percent, and probably not even 95 percent
    > (Google execs demurred when I asked if they had any meaningful
    > accuracy statistics). My experience is that it captures your voice
    > query substantially more than half the time, and that in itself is a
    > revelation. It also makes the usual sampling of funny mistakes. (My
    > favorite was my inability to get it to recognize “Camp Unalayee,”
    > which I attended as a teenager. It would usually respond “Camp
    > Ukulele.” But heck, unalayee is a Cherokee word that means “place of
    > friends,” and ukulele is in the dictionary.)
    >
    > Yet after five days of using the service it still seems better than
    > any speech recognition system I have used to date. It may even signify
    > an inflection point — speech recognition that is more useful than
    > typing.
    >
    > I was initially intrigued by the Google Mobile App because I have been
    > following the progress of speech recognition research since the early
    > 1980s. Progress in this field feels like watching paint dry. Yet the
    > industry’s visionaries have been unanimous in saying that we will talk
    > to machines — and they will understand us — someday.
    >
    > It was probably in 1983 that researchers at SRI International
    > demonstrated how they could control simulated battleships with voice
    > commands (“go left,” “go right,” “stop,” that sort of thing).
    > Evolution has been slow because it turns out that recognizing speech
    > is a really, really hard problem. There are all the complexities of
    > language, plus accents and background noise.
    >
    > In the past decade, however, progress has accelerated. The stakes are
    > very high and there are a number of big and small players. The search
    > giants Google, Microsoft and Yahoo all believe speech recognition is a
    > prerequisite for the era of mobile computing. And there are lots of
    > others including I.B.M., Nuance and Vlingo that are developing speech
    > technology.
    >
    > Although Microsoft hasn’t dominated in this area yet, the company has
    > been investing heavily in research in the field going back to the
    > 1980s. Last year it spent close to $1 billion to acquire Tellme
    > Networks, a company based in Silicon Valley that supplies speech
    > recognition for the phone directory and operator assistance market.
    >
    > “You want to be able to interact with your phone just like you would
    > with your mom or friends,” said Dariusz Paczuski, senior director for
    > consumer services at Tellme. “Voice is a great interface and it can
    > simplify interactions more than anything.”
    >
    > Everyone agrees that in mobile applications, speech is the obvious
    > user interface. Whether it’s on a BlackBerry, an Android phone or an
    > iPhone, typing will always be error-prone and frustrating.
    >
    > If one company makes a major breakthrough in voice, it is potentially
    > a major threat to its rivals, because a “speech interface” could
    > potentially allow one company to simply take over a handheld device
    > developed by another company.
    >
    > For some time we seem to have been stuck at the stage where speech
    > recognition works, but just sort of. Perhaps we are at a moment like
    > the one when A.T.M.’s were first introduced. At first most people said
    > they preferred interacting with a human bank teller. Then, overnight
    > it seemed, everyone realized that the bank teller relationship wasn’t
    > all it was cracked up to be. Now most of us never set foot inside a
    > bank. How long before people find that it is more efficient to deal
    > with a robot on the phone than a human?
    >
    > Enough with the future-gazing. Right now there is something compelling
    > about saying “backpacking trails Trinity Alps California,” and being
    > taken directly to a Web site listing all of the best ones.
    >
    > If you’ve tried out voice searching with the Google Mobile App for
    > iPhone, leave a comment and let us know how it went.


    Google is providing iPhone owners with means to search everything they
    could possibly want through speech. An update to the free Google
    Mobile App will enable it to sense when the user wants to do a voice
    search, through the built in accelerometer, according to an YouTube
    demonstration of the app.

    A NY Times report reveals that Google researchers have achieved this
    by adding sophisticated voice recognition technology to the Google app
    available for free download via the iTunes App Store. If you need to
    find out things, like where is the nearest restaurant, you actually
    ask the phone “where is the nearest StarBucks” and Google Search will
    instantly produce results. Best of all, the results are based on your
    location.

    So, whether you live in San Francisco, New York, or UK, the same
    question is answered differently by the Google Mobile App, which
    senses your location. Not to worry, though - you can still do your
    text searches, and even use the app's convenient suggestions and
    options to zero in on something.

    It has been revealed in the NY Times report that Google’s advantage in
    this field is the ability to store and analyze vast amounts of data.
    “Whatever they introduce now, it will greatly increase in accuracy in
    three or six months,” said Raj Reddy, an artificial intelligence
    researcher at Carnegie Mellon University, who has done pioneering work
    in voice recognition. “It’s important to understand that machine
    recognition will never be perfect,” he added.

    “The question is, How close can they come to human performance?”



  10. #10
    4phun
    Guest

    iPhone voice search would have been considered science-fiction justone year ago!

    On Nov 18, 11:25*am, iPhone 3Gold <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Nov 18, 11:11*am, iPhone 3Gold <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > November 18, 2008, 12:30 am
    > > Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines That Listen
    > > By John Markoff

    >
    > > How do you talk to a search engine? In Googlish, of course.

    >
    > > Google’s new speech recognition service for the iPhone, which I wrote
    > > about last week and which was released on Monday, understands you most
    > > accurately when you speak to it just the way you enter queries into
    > > the Google search box. That makes sense, because the system’s accuracy
    > > comes from the billions and billions of typed queries that Google has
    > > recorded over the years.
    > > Google’s voice search software for iPhones. (Peter DaSilva for The New
    > > York Times)

    >
    > > So don’t bother with polite formalisms like “What is the best pizza
    > > restaurant in San Francisco?” Simply say “best pizza restaurant San
    > > Francisco.”

    >
    > > After all, you’re talking to a dumb machine — or perhaps several,
    > > distributed across multiple states.

    >
    > > The accuracy is far from 100 percent, and probably not even 95 percent
    > > (Google execs demurred when I asked if they had any meaningful
    > > accuracy statistics). My experience is that it captures your voice
    > > query substantially more than half the time, and that in itself is a
    > > revelation. It also makes the usual sampling of funny mistakes. (My
    > > favorite was my inability to get it to recognize “Camp Unalayee,”
    > > which I attended as a teenager. It would usually respond “Camp
    > > Ukulele.” But heck, unalayee is a Cherokee word that means “place of
    > > friends,” and ukulele is in the dictionary.)

    >
    > > Yet after five days of using the service it still seems better than
    > > any speech recognition system I have used to date. It may even signify
    > > an inflection point — speech recognition that is more useful than
    > > typing.

    >
    > > I was initially intrigued by the Google Mobile App because I have been
    > > following the progress of speech recognition research since the early
    > > 1980s. Progress in this field feels like watching paint dry. Yet the
    > > industry’s visionaries have been unanimous in saying that we will talk
    > > to machines — and they will understand us — someday.

    >
    > > It was probably in 1983 that researchers at SRI International
    > > demonstrated how they could control simulated battleships with voice
    > > commands (“go left,” “go right,” “stop,” that sort of thing).
    > > Evolution has been slow because it turns out that recognizing speech
    > > is a really, really hard problem. There are all the complexities of
    > > language, plus accents and background noise.

    >
    > > In the past decade, however, progress has accelerated. The stakes are
    > > very high and there are a number of big and small players. The search
    > > giants Google, Microsoft and Yahoo all believe speech recognition is a
    > > prerequisite for the era of mobile computing. And there are lots of
    > > others including I.B.M., Nuance and Vlingo that are developing speech
    > > technology.

    >
    > > Although Microsoft hasn’t dominated in this area yet, the company has
    > > been investing heavily in research in the field going back to the
    > > 1980s. Last year it spent close to $1 billion to acquire Tellme
    > > Networks, a company based in Silicon Valley that supplies speech
    > > recognition for the phone directory and operator assistance market.

    >
    > > “You want to be able to interact with your phone just like you would
    > > with your mom or friends,” said Dariusz Paczuski, senior director for
    > > consumer services at Tellme. “Voice is a great interface and it can
    > > simplify interactions more than anything.”

    >
    > > Everyone agrees that in mobile applications, speech is the obvious
    > > user interface. Whether it’s on a BlackBerry, an Android phone or an
    > > iPhone, typing will always be error-prone and frustrating.

    >
    > > If one company makes a major breakthrough in voice, it is potentially
    > > a major threat to its rivals, because a “speech interface” could
    > > potentially allow one company to simply take over a handheld device
    > > developed by another company.

    >
    > > For some time we seem to have been stuck at the stage where speech
    > > recognition works, but just sort of. Perhaps we are at a moment like
    > > the one when A.T.M.’s were first introduced. At first most people said
    > > they preferred interacting with a human bank teller. Then, overnight
    > > it seemed, everyone realized that the bank teller relationship wasn’t
    > > all it was cracked up to be. Now most of us never set foot inside a
    > > bank. How long before people find that it is more efficient to deal
    > > with a robot on the phone than a human?

    >
    > > Enough with the future-gazing. Right now there is something compelling
    > > about saying “backpacking trails Trinity Alps California,” and being
    > > taken directly to a Web site listing all of the best ones.

    >
    > > If you’ve tried out voice searching with the Google Mobile App for
    > > iPhone, leave a comment and let us know how it went.

    >
    > Google is providing iPhone owners with means to search everything they
    > could possibly want through speech. An update to the free Google
    > Mobile App will enable it to sense when the user wants to do a voice
    > search, through the built in accelerometer, according to an YouTube
    > demonstration of the app.
    >
    > A NY Times report reveals that Google researchers have achieved this
    > by adding sophisticated voice recognition technology to the Google app
    > available for free download via the iTunes App Store. If you need to
    > find out things, like where is the nearest restaurant, you actually
    > ask the phone “where is the nearest StarBucks” and Google Search will
    > instantly produce results. Best of all, the results are based on your
    > location.
    >
    > So, whether you live in San Francisco, New York, or UK, the same
    > question is answered differently by the Google Mobile App, which
    > senses your location. Not to worry, though - you can still do your
    > text searches, and even use the app's convenient suggestions and
    > options to zero in on something.
    >
    > It has been revealed in the NY Times report that Google’s advantage in
    > this field is the ability to store and analyze vast amounts of data.
    > “Whatever they introduce now, it will greatly increase in accuracy in
    > three or six months,” said Raj Reddy, an artificial intelligence
    > researcher at Carnegie Mellon University, who has done pioneering work
    > in voice recognition. “It’s important to understand that machine
    > recognition will never be perfect,” he added.
    >
    > “The question is, How close can they come to human performance?”


    Google Voice Search, an early Christmas present for iPhone owners
    Mobility
    By Christian Zibreg
    Tuesday, November 18, 2008 10:17

    Mountain View (CA) – Google’s much anticipated voice search
    application has finally arrived at Apple’s AppStore. And after playing
    with the software for a few hours we have to say that we are deeply
    impressed. There is something unique and mind-changing about being
    able to pick up the handset, say "movie show times" and receive not
    only general search results, but information about movie show times at
    theaters in the area of your current geographical location.

    Following a weekend of uncertainty and lots of speculation about
    growing tensions between Apple and Google, the companies released
    Google’s promised voice search iPhone application late on Monday. And
    as far as we can tell, the software works just as we were told: You
    pick up the handset, say a search query and the application returns
    search results in text. "Just hold the phone to your ear, wait for the
    beep, and say what you're looking for," wrote Dave Burke, Google
    mobile team engineer manager in a blog post. "That's it. Just talk."

    Although it was believed that Google would release the software as a
    standalone application, the company updated its existing free iPhone
    application called Google Mobile App with two new features: “Voice
    Search” and “Search with My Location”. Google Mobile App is an iPhone-
    optimized front-end interface to common Google services, like search
    and maps. It can be used to start a Google search with a single click,
    get relevant search and URL suggestions during typing, access past
    searches and display nearby business suggestions on a map.

    If you have ever worked with speech recognition software before, then
    you know how much time can go into training an application to reduce
    the error rate of recognized words and phrases. Voice Search does not
    need any training. The software uses the iPhone’s accelerometer sensor
    to detect when a user moves the handset close to the ear and
    automatically switches to "listening mode" (which can be triggered
    manually as well, simply by tapping the microphone icon.) Users can
    also bring up the virtual keyboard to modify the search terms by
    double tapping the search box.

    Search with the “My Location” feature allows you to perform a local
    search without having to specify where you are. The feature works in
    tandem with geolocation features of the handset to deliver results
    tailored to your current location. For example, if you pick up the
    handset and say "restaurants", "weather", or "movie show times" you
    will get corresponding information that is relevant to your current
    geographical information displayed on a map. To make this feature
    work, the “Location Services” option in the iPhone Settings needs to
    be enabled – and users are required to agree that Google Mobile App
    can tap into your location data.

    So far, we have discovered only two drawbacks. First, when you click
    on any search result, the application opens a link in Safari. This
    goes against the idea of searching in a single application, because
    you have to quit Safari and open Google Mobile App to perform another
    search. We would love to see an app built into the web browser so that
    we can perform searches and follow links on a results page - all from
    within the application.

    Second, you can't voice-search contacts in your address book, which is
    understandable since the speech recognition feature does not run
    within the application, but on Google servers. Also, we have to
    mention that Voice Search is currently only available to U.S. users.
    iPhone users who do not have an iTunes Store account that is
    authorized through a credit card issued in the U.S. will not be able
    to download the application until Google releases versions for other
    markets.

    Overall, this is one of the most useful iPhone applications available
    today. It seems as if Google has found a way to remove the
    experimental character from voice recognition and finally come up with
    a solution that can be used on an everyday basis. A feature like this
    on a cellphone would have been considered science-fiction just one
    year ago.

    It seems that, despite all rumors, Apple and Google are still buddies.
    But we do have to say that we are a bit surprised that this feature
    was introduced on the iPhone first and not on Google’s own G1 Android
    phone sold by T-Mobile.



  11. #11
    4phun
    Guest

    Google iPhone app the first step to true and accurate voicerecognition and translation

    This is the first step to true and accurate voice recognition and
    translation:

    1) Google user speaks search string into phone.

    2) Google gets it wrong, user corrects Google

    3) Multiply by millions of searches daily with constant correction and
    feedback from users

    4) Perfect voice rec, major profit

    There will be a few issues with voice recognition to begin with but as
    it gets better and more people use the service and add to the database
    with their corrections and add to the pool of variable accents etc the
    accuracy will be perfected at an exponential rate.

    A similar concept could apply to translations. Once voice recognition
    is perfected and becomes the primary search input of choice then more
    people will be able to use their phones as direct voice to voice
    translators. Obvious translation mistakes will become apparent through
    mass use. At every turn users could flag apparent mistranslations and
    through the help of the Google Borg accurate translations would
    evolve. Much the same way that Wikipedia pages tend to accuracy over
    time even with the input of a subset of "disruptive" users.



  12. #12
    4phun
    Guest

    "Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage ofthis, dagnabbit?"

    "Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage of
    this, dagnabbit?"

    For the same reasons all the nerds despise the iPhone: because of it's
    uniformity right across the board, powerful graphics and CPU and
    consistent user experience. If you want to debut a powerful
    application, the iPhone makes the most sense of any platform.

    And given the fractured nature of every other vendors offerings, why
    ruin the experiment on crappy inconsistent platforms?

    Go with the best, someday release for the rest.



  13. #13
    4phun
    Guest

    Re: "Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage ofthis, dagnabbit?"

    On Nov 18, 12:54*pm, 4phun <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage of
    > this, dagnabbit?"
    >
    > For the same reasons all the nerds despise the iPhone: because of it's
    > uniformity right across the board, powerful graphics and CPU and
    > consistent user experience. If you want to debut a powerful
    > application, the iPhone makes the most sense of any platform.
    >
    > And given the fractured nature of every other vendors offerings, why
    > ruin the experiment on crappy inconsistent platforms?
    >
    > Go with the best, someday release for the rest.


    The app is FREE
    Google Mobile Voice Search

    Plus connection is FREE
    Google Mobile Search for the iPhone doesn't require cell minutes as
    the voice is transfered via data connection of Wifi or 3G

    Plus results are FREE
    and results aren't some crappy SMS or MMS message but full graphics
    and RTF transfered via data connection again not using SMS units.





  14. #14
    4phun
    Guest

    Tim O'Reilly: Voice in Google Mobile App: A Tipping Point for theWeb?


    > On Nov 18, 12:54*pm, 4phun <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > Go with the best, someday release for the rest.

    >



    Voice in Google Mobile App: A Tipping Point for the Web?
    by Tim O'Reilly

    As I wrote in Daddy, Where's Your Phone?, it's time to start thinking
    of the phone as a first class device for accessing web services, not
    as a way of repurposing content or applications originally designed to
    be accessed on a keyboard and big screen. The release of speech
    recognition in Google Mobile App for iPhone continues the process
    begun with the iPhone itself, of building a new, phone-native way of
    delivering computing services. Here are two of the key elements:

    1. Sensor-based interfaces. Apple wowed us with iPhone touch
    screen, but the inclusion of the accelerometer was almost as
    important, and now Google has shown us how it can be used as a key
    component of an application user interface. Put the phone to your ear,
    and the application starts listening, triggered by the natural gesture
    rather than by an artificial tap or click. Yes, the accelerometer has
    been used in games like tilt, parlor amusements like the iPint, but
    Google has pushed things further by integrating it into a kind of
    workflow with the phone's main sensor, the microphone.

    This is the future of mobile: to invent interfaces that throw
    away the assumptions of the previous generation. Point and click was a
    breakthrough for PCs, but it's a trap for mobile interface design.
    Right now, the iPhone (and other similar smartphones) have an array of
    sensors: the microphone, the camera, the touchscreen, the
    accelerometer, the location sensor (GPS or cell triangulation), and
    yes, on many, the keyboard and pointing device. Future applications
    will surprise us by using them in new ways, and in new combinations;
    future devices will provide richer and richer arrays of senses (yes,
    senses, not just sensors) for paying attention to what we want.

    Could a phone recognize the gesture of raising the camera up and
    then holding it steady to launch the camera application? Could we talk
    to the phone to adjust camera settings? (There's a constrained
    language around lighting and speed and focus that should be easy to
    recognize.) Could a phone recognize the motion of a car and switch
    automatically to voice dialing? And of course, there are all the Wii-
    like interactions with other devices that are possible when we think
    of the phone as a controller. Sensor based workflows are the future of
    UI design.

    2. Cloud integration. It's easy to forget that the speech
    recognition isn't happening on your phone. It's happening on Google's
    servers. It's Google's vast database of speech data that makes the
    speech recognition work so well. It would be hard to pack all that
    into a local device.

    And that of course is the future of mobile as well. A mobile
    phone is inherently a connected device with local memory and
    processing. But it's time we realized that the local compute power is
    a fraction of what's available in the cloud. Web applications take
    this for granted -- for example, when we request a map tile for our
    phone -- but it's surprising how many native applications settle
    themselves comfortably in their silos. (Consider my long-ago complaint
    that the phone address book cries out to be a connected application
    powered by my phone company's call-history database, annotated by data
    harvested from my online social networking applications as well as
    other online sources.)

    Put these two trends together, and we can imagine the future of
    mobile: a sensor-rich device with applications that use those sensors
    both to feed and interact with cloud services. The location sensor
    knows you're here so you don't need to tell the map server where to
    start; the microphone knows the sound of your voice, so it unlocks
    your private data in the cloud; the camera images an object or a
    person, sends it to a remote application that recognizes it, and
    retrieves relevant data. All of these things already exist in
    scattered applications, but eventually, they will be the new normal.

    This is an incredibly exciting time in mobile application design.
    There are breakthroughs waiting to happen. Voice and gesture
    recognition in the Google Mobile App is just the beginning.



  15. #15
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: Google iPhone app the first step to true and accurate voice recognition andtranslation

    At 18 Nov 2008 09:40:14 -0800 4phun wrote:
    > This is the first step to true and accurate voice recognition and
    > translation:
    >
    > 1) Google user speaks search string into phone.
    >
    > 2) Google gets it wrong, user corrects Google
    >
    > 3) Multiply by millions of searches daily with constant correction and
    > feedback from users
    >
    > 4) Perfect voice rec, major profit
    >
    > There will be a few issues with voice recognition to begin with but as
    > it gets better and more people use the service and add to the database
    > with their corrections and add to the pool of variable accents etc the
    > accuracy will be perfected at an exponential rate.



    Perhaps, but only in a *****-checker sort of way. The system will simulate
    increased accuracy by replacing non-understood inputwith likely
    possibilities based on things most people have searched for, in an "80/20
    rule" methodology, "correcting" seldom used search terms you might have
    actually wanted, into more popular ones you didn't. (I.e. a query for
    "Seratonin" might return "Sarah Palin", since the latter currently gets far
    more hits than the former.)


    > A similar concept could apply to translations. Once voice recognition
    > is perfected and becomes the primary search input of choice then more
    > people will be able to use their phones as direct voice to voice
    > translators. Obvious translation mistakes will become apparent through
    > mass use. At every turn users could flag apparent mistranslations and
    > through the help of the Google Borg accurate translations would
    > evolve. Much the same way that Wikipedia pages tend to accuracy over
    > time even with the input of a subset of "disruptive" users.



    True, which will be state of the art until mobile devices get enough power
    to handle speech recognition on-board instead of relying on a server. On-
    board processing will allow the accuracy to evolve based on YOUR input alone,
    rather than the input of the entire "herd" of users.





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