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  1. #1
    Jer
    Guest

    Giggle from CNN.com...

    http://tinyurl.com/4fm4z

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



    See More: First cell phone was a true 'brick'




  2. #2
    RH
    Guest

    Re: First cell phone was a true 'brick'

    I had one of those Motorola Bricks in 93 or 94.
    Our boss bought a bunch of them for our service department. You
    couldn't get a days worth of time on the battery, if you left it in
    standby mode and didn't talk on it much more than 20 minutes total.
    How times change.......My V505 can go days in standby, and will talk
    for hours on a charge, not to mention it won't drag your pants down
    carrying it on your belt


    On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 19:25:50 -0500, Jer <[email protected]ten> wrote:

    >
    >Giggle from CNN.com...
    >
    >http://tinyurl.com/4fm4z





  3. #3
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: First cell phone was a true 'brick'

    RH wrote:
    > I had one of those Motorola Bricks in 93 or 94.
    > Our boss bought a bunch of them for our service department. You
    > couldn't get a days worth of time on the battery, if you left it in
    > standby mode and didn't talk on it much more than 20 minutes total.
    > How times change.......My V505 can go days in standby, and will talk
    > for hours on a charge, not to mention it won't drag your pants down
    > carrying it on your belt
    >
    >
    > On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 19:25:50 -0500, Jer <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Giggle from CNN.com...
    >>
    >>http://tinyurl.com/4fm4z

    >
    >



    I still have mine, but I no longer use it. I recall the demise of a
    number of belt loops though.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  4. #4
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: First cell phone was a true 'brick'

    Evan Platt wrote:
    > On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 19:25:50 -0500, Jer <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Giggle from CNN.com...
    >>
    >>http://tinyurl.com/4fm4z

    >
    >
    > Was that the first phone? I seem to recall a less fancy looking
    > version of that phone (same shape / design). which I have one of lying
    > around here somewhere. Can't recall the model name though.
    >
    > Evan



    That particular form factor was used on more than one model, the
    earliest had a HUGE battery with a curb weight putting it beyond a
    pocketable design even for Capt. Kangaroo. When battery technology
    improved, we called the slimmer version a mini-brick. This is the model
    I see in the picture.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  5. #5
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: First cell phone was a true 'brick'

    Scott en Aztlán wrote:
    > On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 00:40:53 GMT, RH <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I had one of those Motorola Bricks in 93 or 94.
    >>Our boss bought a bunch of them for our service department. You
    >>couldn't get a days worth of time on the battery, if you left it in
    >>standby mode and didn't talk on it much more than 20 minutes total.
    >>How times change.......My V505 can go days in standby, and will talk
    >>for hours on a charge, not to mention it won't drag your pants down
    >>carrying it on your belt

    >
    >
    > OTOH, there's nothing like a 3-watt bag phone hooked to your cigarette
    > lighter when you're WAAAAY out in the boonies. Those old clunkers work
    > in places my Cingular phone never could.
    >



    True enough, but those days are numbered. If one is going to drive THAT
    far off the beaten path, one should maybe consider that staying that
    much in touch is detrimental to why one drove that far in the first place.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'




  6. #6
    Bruce D. Brown
    Guest

    Re: First cell phone was a true 'brick'

    Motorola Bricks in 93 or 94????. I have had cellular since the mid 70s.
    Motorola was the first phone provider and Chicago was where it started.
    Talk about bricks. My first phone was 1/2 the size of my trunk and back in
    the 70s you had a huge trunk so the phone was massive. Of course the
    service was very immature and the coverage was very unreliable. I remember
    when the first Motorola hand-helds came out (about 1985). I seem to
    remember the model as Motorola 800, but I might be wrong on that point.
    They were about a foot long and very heavy to carry. Battery life, forget
    battery life, they offered very little life compared to today.

    I won't even talk about the cost of the phone (about $3,400 for the first
    commercially available phone) and I would run between $500 to $1,000 per
    month in chargers with ATT. Some months I would run close to $1,300. At
    that time there were no customers other that business customers. Very few
    individuals could afford that kind of monthly cost so the only customers
    were business customers.

    Today, I carry a Blackberry 7100 and have a relatively small phone with
    great features. I can receive and send my email using my phone and best of
    all my bill runs about $200 per month for the service.

    Definitely no longer a brick.

    Bruce D. Brown


    "Scott en Aztlán" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 00:40:53 GMT, RH <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I had one of those Motorola Bricks in 93 or 94.
    >>Our boss bought a bunch of them for our service department. You
    >>couldn't get a days worth of time on the battery, if you left it in
    >>standby mode and didn't talk on it much more than 20 minutes total.
    >>How times change.......My V505 can go days in standby, and will talk
    >>for hours on a charge, not to mention it won't drag your pants down
    >>carrying it on your belt

    >
    > OTOH, there's nothing like a 3-watt bag phone hooked to your cigarette
    > lighter when you're WAAAAY out in the boonies. Those old clunkers work
    > in places my Cingular phone never could.
    >
    > --
    > Life is short - drive fast!






  7. #7
    Drewdawg
    Guest

    Re: First cell phone was a true 'brick'

    Scott en Aztlán wrote:
    > On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 00:40:53 GMT, RH <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I had one of those Motorola Bricks in 93 or 94.
    >> Our boss bought a bunch of them for our service department. You
    >> couldn't get a days worth of time on the battery, if you left it in
    >> standby mode and didn't talk on it much more than 20 minutes total.
    >> How times change.......My V505 can go days in standby, and will talk
    >> for hours on a charge, not to mention it won't drag your pants down
    >> carrying it on your belt

    >
    > OTOH, there's nothing like a 3-watt bag phone hooked to your cigarette
    > lighter when you're WAAAAY out in the boonies. Those old clunkers work
    > in places my Cingular phone never could.


    There's also nothing like an analog cell connection. My first cell was
    Verizon in Hesperia, CA (got it Sept 2002) and I'd get the occasional analog
    call. Beat the digital artifact filled signal hands down. I considered an
    analog call a rare treat. :-)

    Just IMHO, YMMV ;-)





  8. #8
    Bubba DeBub
    Guest

    Re: First cell phone was a true 'brick'

    The problem with analog is that it is not secure. The 10 year old geek kid
    next door with a police scanner can listen to your conversation.

    Bubba
    (Lifetime NRA Member)
    (Bull Riders Association of America)
    (Winner, Texas Cow Chip Throwing Contest 2002)


    "Drewdawg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Scott en Aztlán wrote:
    >> On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 00:40:53 GMT, RH <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I had one of those Motorola Bricks in 93 or 94.
    >>> Our boss bought a bunch of them for our service department. You
    >>> couldn't get a days worth of time on the battery, if you left it in
    >>> standby mode and didn't talk on it much more than 20 minutes total.
    >>> How times change.......My V505 can go days in standby, and will talk
    >>> for hours on a charge, not to mention it won't drag your pants down
    >>> carrying it on your belt

    >>
    >> OTOH, there's nothing like a 3-watt bag phone hooked to your cigarette
    >> lighter when you're WAAAAY out in the boonies. Those old clunkers work
    >> in places my Cingular phone never could.

    >
    > There's also nothing like an analog cell connection. My first cell was
    > Verizon in Hesperia, CA (got it Sept 2002) and I'd get the occasional
    > analog
    > call. Beat the digital artifact filled signal hands down. I considered an
    > analog call a rare treat. :-)
    >
    > Just IMHO, YMMV ;-)
    >
    >






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