Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Z @ R
    Guest
    I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.

    I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
    around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
    about to come in.

    If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call or
    text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever you
    are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.

    Anyone else notice this?


    --

    - Jonathan

    FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
    Added February 2005!
    Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
    hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
    the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.







    See More: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?




  2. #2
    MacDog
    Guest

    Re: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?

    " Z @ R " <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.
    >
    > I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
    > around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
    > about to come in.
    >
    > If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call or
    > text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever
    > you
    > are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.
    >
    > Anyone else notice this?


    that happens with all GSM phones... nothing to get alarmed about.

    hell, dazzle your friends when you know the phone is gonna ring before it
    actually does!

    how's the service working out for you?





  3. #3
    Z @ R
    Guest

    Re: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?

    > that happens with all GSM phones... nothing to get alarmed about.
    >
    > hell, dazzle your friends when you know the phone is gonna ring before it
    > actually does!
    >
    > how's the service working out for you?


    stop following me.

    Ah, GSM. so it's a cingular thing, not a RAZR thing? Got it. I've been a
    sprint guy for five years...

    Service is pretty good. I think Cingular has better coverage in my area
    (i.e., it works well in my living room and basement when sprint didn't), but
    i experience more occasional static than i did with sprint, almost like
    Analog static.


    --

    - Jonathan

    FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
    Added February 2005!
    Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
    hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
    the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.



    "MacDog" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > " Z @ R " <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.
    >>
    >> I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
    >> around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
    >> about to come in.
    >>
    >> If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call
    >> or
    >> text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever
    >> you
    >> are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.
    >>
    >> Anyone else notice this?

    >
    > that happens with all GSM phones... nothing to get alarmed about.
    >
    > hell, dazzle your friends when you know the phone is gonna ring before it
    > actually does!
    >
    > how's the service working out for you?
    >






  4. #4
    Susan
    Guest

    Re: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?

    I get this with my TDMA phone (nokia 3560) i think this is the nature of
    cellular. about to get my motorola 551 TOMORROW!!

    --





  5. #5
    JHMedia
    Guest

    Re: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?


    Susan wrote:
    > I get this with my TDMA phone (nokia 3560) i think this is the nature

    of
    > cellular. about to get my motorola 551 TOMORROW!!
    >
    > --

    This is a nice device, and since the motorola v551 is a smartphone, we
    tested and found it works great with an Internet connection and our s/w
    from Orb Networks - and it's free. If you run this s/w on your
    broadband connected XP PC, you'll be able to see and/or hear any of
    your content on your phone like your music, videos, your photos and
    even live TV (if you have a tuner in your PC). It streams this to
    other devices too, any internet connected PC, PDA, etc...




  6. #6
    Craven Morehead
    Guest

    Re: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?

    Once and for all...

    This interference is a result of the frequencies used by GSM. If your GSM
    handset is near the audio device (speaker phone, stereo, mp3 player or
    almost anything with a speaker), you're going to get these sounds whenever
    the handset transmits. This occurs periodically when the handset and the
    cell site "handshake". That is, the cell site interrogates all handsets
    within range and exchanges a small amount of data. Something like (cell
    site) "..whomever is out there, identify yourself?". (handset) "...I'm
    here and available. My number is xxx-xxx-xxxx".

    Also, when someone calls your cellphone, the cell site broadcasts a data
    stream to all handsets, looking for yours. Your handset then transmits a
    short burst of data, identifying itself. (this is why you can sometimes
    tell when the cell phone is about to ring). Then the cell site sends a
    ringing signal and your handset rings.

    During the time you're talking, the handset is transmitting, so the
    interference continues.

    Generally, all GSM handsets should cause about the same amount of
    interference. The variables are; 1) distance between the handset and the
    audio device, 2) shielding of audio components inside the device being
    interfered with.
    ****************************************************************************
    ***
    Since this question comes up about once every 2 - 3 days here, let's just
    copy and repost it occasionally.

    " Z @ R " <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I just picked up the Motorola RAZR for Cingular.
    >
    > I've noticed something peculiar. This phone radiates a ridiculous field
    > around it, causing radio interference whenever a call or text message is
    > about to come in.
    >
    > If the phone is within 10 feet of a radio, you can predict a phone call or
    > text message about 2 seconds before it actually arrives because whatever

    you
    > are listening to becomes garbled with digital RF static.
    >
    > Anyone else notice this?
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > - Jonathan
    >
    > FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
    > Added February 2005!
    > Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
    > hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
    > the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.
    >
    >
    >
    >






  7. #7
    Mike S.
    Guest

    Re: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?


    In article <[email protected]>,
    Craven Morehead <[email protected]> wrote:

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Craven Morehead <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Once and for all...
    >
    >This interference is a result of the frequencies used by GSM.


    Once again ...

    GSM, TDMA, CDMA, and analog have all shared various portions of the radio
    spectrum, but it's only GSM (and to a lesser extent, TDMA) that causes
    such interference on those same radio frequencies.

    Why? Because the relevant "frequencies" are the width and spacing of the
    data bursts, not so much the radio carrier frequencies.

    Here is a relevant posting from the early days:


    Date: 11 Mar 94 21:34:21 EST
    From: Stewart Fist <[email protected]>
    Subject: GSM and TDMA Problems

    John Sims <[email protected]> asks about the problems with GSM.

    They are pretty much the same as with all TDMA systems, including the
    TDMA now being introduced into the USA -- and they'll be worse with
    DECT and DCS1800 which are designed to be used indoors in large
    offices.

    You can look at these problems in a number of different ways and at a
    number of different levels. The primary problem is that they were
    introduced in competition to perfectly good analog cellular networks,
    and they failed to provide any real customer advantages. A system
    needs to be better than the one it replaces. The magical name
    'digital' doesn't carry much weight with customers after a while.

    Coverage area is another major problem, and here the American TDMA has
    a better solution than GSM because it emphasised dual-mode handsets
    with analog providing coverage where digital wasn't available. GSM
    didn't do this, so in most nations with the system (except Germany)
    you are limited to a very small coverage area, and a very limited
    range of base-stations, often with minimal equipment, and with great
    holes in the cells. Drop outs on the Sydney GSM networks seem to
    range between 40% and up to 80% for a car crossing the city.

    Sound quality in all digital systems seems to be consistent, but only
    'acceptable'. While good static-free reception extends to the
    boundaries of the cell, they do all suffer from a staccato-like effect
    when driving down tree-line corridors (especially after dew or rain)
    and they drop the link precipitously, without warning, at the
    boundary. This is not how consumers think a phone system should
    behave.

    Within buildings, they have many more penetration and Rayleigh-fading
    problems than analog also. Range of a GSM cell, at present is limited
    to 35kms, which is too small for Australia, but this will be fixed in
    1996 by slot-stealing.

    GSM and TDMA base stations also need to radiate from higher points for
    good coverage, but if they do that, they then interfere with other
    cells. Capacity is set by the amount of general R/F interference
    being introduced, and generally they seem to be only getting two to
    three-times that of AMPS.

    wants International roaming, because it is used in New Zealand,
    Australia, most of Asia, and the America's. What we needed for good
    international roaming was a dual-mode AMPS/TACS handset (and the
    difference is really only in the R/F stage, so this would have been
    easy to do).

    The main problems are the R/F interference effects, and these are
    common to all TDMA systems (including the new DECT and DCS-1800) and
    they are cumulative -- so we see only a few signs of the problems now,
    but like automobile pollution growth in cities, it will get worse as
    the population of users grows. There are four main problems here:

    1. General R/F pollution. Any system that switches its R/F
    transmitter on and off rapidly (GSM does it 217 times a second, TDMA
    does it 50 times) will scatter EMI throughout the adjacent radio
    spectrum. And the sharper the edge of the switch power (on and off),
    the wider the band of hash it scatters. These sets need a 3-5MHz
    guard-band between them and analog AMPS channels,and they try to ramp
    up the power, and still they scatter crap into nearby television
    broadcast bands. We've never had anything that generates EMI like a
    GSM handset before in these bands. We need large numbers of them like
    we need a hole in the head.

    2. Audio-Hz interference. The on-off cycle of transmission power will
    be read by any analog circuit nearby (with any rectification or
    asymmetrical circuits) as an intrusive audio tone of 217Hz, and the
    two major harmonics above. This buzz intrudes into hearing aids at
    distances up to 30 metres, and is often intolerable at 2 metres. It
    also gets into cassette recorder, wireline systems, and into modems as
    a carrier tone.

    3. Digital byte intrusions. In digital circuits, where the track on a
    circuit board is about the length of a GSM antenna, the on-off cycle
    of transmission power is often being read as a data-byte. If only one
    GSM handset is operating in a vicinity, it will pulse in the first (of
    eight) slots in a frame, and so produce a 1000 0000 byte at 217 bytes
    (1736 bits) a second. This can also be read as 1100 0000, 0000 0000
    at 3.4kbit/s, or 1110 0000 etc. at 5.2kbit/s (and so on).

    When two or more handsets are working in the same location, they are
    all synchronised to the same base-station (same or different
    channels). So amplitude effects (same slot, different channels) are
    cumulative: the fact that they may be using different channels is
    immaterial, so the range of interference can increase. A number of
    handsets will combine to create what amounts to random number
    generation (they are also frequency hopping) of power pulses in
    digital control circuits nearby.

    This seems to hit some electronic equipment (laserprinters, modems,
    PCs, TV controllers, possibly air-bag triggers) hard, and have wierd,
    and often un-reproducable effects. The randomness seems to be the
    problem in detecting what caused some 'event'. It is virtually
    impossible to reproduce the conditions.

    This is why some people report no problems at all, others say it
    knocks out their Powerbook or modem or multiplexer, occasionally, or
    every time. Obviously some equipment is far more susceptible than
    others -- but not just in terms of needing EMI shielding.

    4. The last EMI problems is the remote possibility (and I stress
    'remote possibility') that the pulsation of the microwaves can create
    a different type, or order, of health problems to analog. Analog is
    expected to only have a 'brain and eye-lens' heating effect (but not
    everyone is convinced about this).

    Digital TDMA introduces a new factor. It is known for instance, that
    some enzyme reactions in chemical processes are sped up enormously
    when hit by pulsating R/F, but no one seems to know why. This needs a
    lot more research, but is no reason for panic. However, it can't be
    dismissed, like may technophiles seem to do.

    The real problem with both GSM and American TDMA is the way in which
    all these problems were kept secret, and the systems were rolled out
    slowly and quietly without anyone admitting problems until the press
    started shouting. When they play these sorts of games, they have only
    themselves to blame when the press reacts strongly and shouts 'foul'
    especially when it is likely to be hearing-impaired people who suffer
    in office environments.

    Later, problems were reluctantly admitted, but always the admission
    was associated with "Don't worry, well fix it!" which is just another
    of their lies. Most of these problems are intrinsic in time-division
    power pulsing.

    More recently the tactic has changed once again: now they blame the
    lack of shielding on hearing-aids and other electronic equipment, and
    want to boost the standard of immunity, rather than reduce their own
    emissions.

    It's the smoke-stack blaming inefficiencies in gas-masks for the
    problems. ETSI is its own worst enemy.



  8. #8
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Motorola V3 RAZR radio interference?

    Mike S. wrote:

    > Why? Because the relevant "frequencies" are the width and spacing of the
    > data bursts, not so much the radio carrier frequencies.
    >
    > Here is a relevant posting from the early days:


    For those who don't want to wade through a long, old post, here's the
    short and relevant version:

    - GSM operates using a sginalling schemed known as TDMA - Time Division
    Multiple access. This means that on the network, conversations are
    multiplexed by dividing each digital stream into time slots. Each
    digital packet of a conversation is ompressed and sent on its specific
    time slot, and no other.

    To facilitate this, a GSM or TDMA phone (including Nextel handsets)
    operate by transmitting in rapid data bursts - on and off pulses. It is
    these rapid on-of pulses that cause the interference that we perceive as
    buzzing or ticking noises in speakers, flickering of monitors, and other
    interference related problems.

    CDMA phones (Code Division Mutiple Access) DO interfere with
    electronics just as GSM and TDMA phones do. The difference is that CDMA
    multiplexes its conversations via a different method. In CDMA, the
    conversation is broken up by spectrum segments, and various parts of the
    code is broadcast over different sections of a wideband channel.
    Instead of on-off pulses, what appears to be a continuous tranmission
    (that also looks a lot like random noise if you don't have the correct
    "signal mask" to decode the transmission) is broadcast. Most
    electronics can cope with this better than a pulsed transmission, and so
    the effects aren't perceived as much.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.



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