Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 25 of 25
  1. #16
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    At 17 Feb 2007 22:29:01 -0600 Jer wrote:

    > Perhaps you missed my other post... my Cingular bud tells me they're
    > currently ramping up for AGPS/LBS service, so I presume Cingular will
    > eventually be offering newer handsets for this. Maybe Cingular's phones
    > will use more sat channels than the others.


    I did miss your other post, sorry.

    While I applaud Cingular for upgrading their technology, does any company
    in the industry deploy more stuff only to rip it out or upgrade it into
    obsolesence shortly afterwards than Cingular? ;-)



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com




    See More: gps mobile tracking




  2. #17
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    At 18 Feb 2007 01:33:47 -0600 Dennis Ferguson wrote:

    > Note that these aren't quite the same thing. CDMA networks have been
    > able to do tower-triangulation for a long time, just about for free.
    > That is, all CDMA base stations have clocks that are time synchronized
    > with GPS, code acquisition gives you a precise measurement of signal
    > arrival times, and in CDMA networks multiple towers track any handsets
    > they hear anyway to implement soft handoff.


    Just curious- why don't you think Verizon or Sprint leveraged this to
    comply with the E911 deadline rather than commit to a GPS based solution?




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com




  3. #18
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    Todd Allcock wrote:
    > At 17 Feb 2007 22:29:01 -0600 Jer wrote:
    >
    >> Perhaps you missed my other post... my Cingular bud tells me they're
    >> currently ramping up for AGPS/LBS service, so I presume Cingular will
    >> eventually be offering newer handsets for this. Maybe Cingular's phones
    >> will use more sat channels than the others.

    >
    > I did miss your other post, sorry.
    >
    > While I applaud Cingular for upgrading their technology, does any company
    > in the industry deploy more stuff only to rip it out or upgrade it into
    > obsolesence shortly afterwards than Cingular? ;-)


    Cingular was forced into this situation by the E911 requirements of the
    FCC which would not extend the deadline for compliance. The TDOA system
    was relatively fast and cheap to deploy.

    Assisted GPS is much more accurate, typically to 10M, but apparently
    wasn't easily integrated with the existing GSM chipsets.

    Qualcomm, the company that everyone loves to hate, came through for the
    CDMA carriers in time for Phase II of E-911.

    A-GPS is a huge marketing advantage in terms of sales to some large
    corporate customers.




  4. #19
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    Todd Allcock wrote:
    > At 18 Feb 2007 01:33:47 -0600 Dennis Ferguson wrote:
    >
    >> Note that these aren't quite the same thing. CDMA networks have been
    >> able to do tower-triangulation for a long time, just about for free.
    >> That is, all CDMA base stations have clocks that are time synchronized
    >> with GPS, code acquisition gives you a precise measurement of signal
    >> arrival times, and in CDMA networks multiple towers track any handsets
    >> they hear anyway to implement soft handoff.

    >
    > Just curious- why don't you think Verizon or Sprint leveraged this to
    > comply with the E911 deadline rather than commit to a GPS based solution?


    I think that since the A-GPS technology was available from Qualcomm for
    CDMA chipsets that the CDMA carriers were convinced that the higher
    accuracy of A-GPS would enable them to win more customers, especially
    high value customers. Disney Mobile, a Sprint MVNO, was marketing
    location based services six months before they even launched their network.

    For some corporate customers, accurate location based service is driving
    their choice of carrier, and once they choose carriers, they aren't
    going to easily change just because another carrier catches up. You see
    that now with high speed data, Cingular is way behind Sprint and Verizon
    in deployment, and has lost the early adopter market.

    Whether the net return in A-GPS was worth the extra cost remains to be
    seen. However it's often the case that you can market a product's
    capability even to customers that initially aren't interested in using
    that capability, but might possibly want to use it. I remember when I
    worked in product marketing for a Taiwanese motherboard company. We
    wasted so much money in adding future capability to boards, such as
    Weitek math co-processor sockets, and even sockets so you could upgrade
    from a 386 to a 486 processor. The number of customers that ever used
    these sockets was close to zero, but it won us huge contracts for boards.

    [Copied to alt.cellular.attws. Please post all alt.cellular.cingular
    posts to alt.cellular.attws as well. The Cingular name is going away,
    and alt.cellular.attws is the proper venue for posts regarding AT&T's
    Wireless Service.]



  5. #20
    Thurman
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking


    "Todd Allcock" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > At 16 Feb 2007 09:34:44 -0600 Thurman wrote:
    >
    >> After research, I chose an iTrek M6. It is four times the performance

    > of the
    >> Holux; fast start, easier Bluetooth bonding, etc.
    >>
    >> If I could just get Google Mobile Maps to recognize the GPS in Mobile

    > 5,
    >> things would be great.

    >
    > Google doesn't "look" for your GPS- it relies on the OS "telling" GMM
    > where it is.
    >
    > Unfortunately the settings applet to do this is hidden- to get it back,
    > you'll need a registry editor, and make the following changes:
    >
    > Add a new DWORD in "HKLM\ControlPanel\GPS Settings" named "Group" and set
    > it to 2.
    >
    >
    > Delete the "HKLM\ControlPanel\GPS Settings\redirect" key. (I think it's
    > called "Hide" instead of "redirect" on some devices- whichever it's
    > called,
    > delete it!)
    >
    >
    >> If Cingular does a pass thru of the new Mobile 6,
    >> things may improve.

    >
    > Unless it stays hidden in WM6 as well! ;-)
    >
    > After making the changes, exit the editor, wait a few seconds (registry
    > writes take awhile in WM5) then reset the phone. Now go into Settings >
    > Connections and select "External GPS" and setup the port your BT GPS
    > connects to.


    I really appreciate that info. However, I'm reluctant to risk bricking a
    $500+ investment.






  6. #21
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    At 18 Feb 2007 10:53:37 -0600 Thurman wrote:

    > I really appreciate that info. However, I'm reluctant to risk bricking

    a
    > $500+ investment.


    While I understand your concern, registry edits aren't harmful to hardware.
    Worst-case scenario, if you really muck something up, you'd have to
    "hard-reset" (which erases everything you've put on it and returns it to
    out-of-the-box" condition.

    Flashing new ROM updates to the device can brick them if somethings goes
    awry.

    Frankly, I've never owned a Pocket PC/WinMobile that didn't need, or at
    least benefitted from a little registry tweaking.

    My guess is that HTC (the maker of the Cingular 8525, 8125, 3125, 2125, T-
    Mo MDA, SDA, Dash, etc.) left this control hidden at Cingular's (and T-
    Mobile's) request so as not to confuse customers into thinking there was
    a GPS built-in.

    The real advantage of activating the control, besides GMM working, is
    that multiple GPS apps can all use the data simultaneously. I'll often
    run Mapopolis for my actual navigation, but occasionally fire up GMM or
    WLM to get local business info. It's nice not having to shut one down to
    use the other.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com




  7. #22
    Thurman
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking


    "Todd Allcock" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > At 18 Feb 2007 10:53:37 -0600 Thurman wrote:
    >
    > My guess is that HTC (the maker of the Cingular 8525, 8125, 3125, 2125, T-
    > Mo MDA, SDA, Dash, etc.) left this control hidden at Cingular's (and T-
    > Mobile's) request so as not to confuse customers into thinking there was
    > a GPS built-in.


    They may have excluded the connection to encourage 'rentals' of TeleNav.

    I had DeLorme, Pocket Streets and MySportTraining GPS all working. It was
    easy to switch among the 3, but it took me a couple of days of experimenting
    to get Telenav to work. One TeleNav started working, the other 3 stopped as
    if they were blocked. Telenav for professional use is a good product, but
    their destination database seems lacking and the GUI could sue some work.

    > The real advantage of activating the control, besides GMM working, is
    > that multiple GPS apps can all use the data simultaneously. I'll often
    > run Mapopolis for my actual navigation, but occasionally fire up GMM or
    > WLM to get local business info. It's nice not having to shut one down to
    > use the other.


    GPS Gate is recommended for that. I'll try a trial download.

    Thanks again.

    Have you tried exporting logs to WinXP Google Earth?





  8. #23
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    At 18 Feb 2007 15:50:41 -0600 Thurman wrote:

    > Have you tried exporting logs to WinXP Google Earth?


    No, I've never tried it. Frankly I rarely use Google Earth on the desktop.




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com




  9. #24
    clifto
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    SMS wrote:
    > Todd Allcock wrote:
    >> While I applaud Cingular for upgrading their technology, does any company
    >> in the industry deploy more stuff only to rip it out or upgrade it into
    >> obsolesence shortly afterwards than Cingular? ;-)

    >
    > Cingular was forced into this situation by the E911 requirements of the
    > FCC which would not extend the deadline for compliance. The TDOA system
    > was relatively fast and cheap to deploy.


    Now, I figured the solution to that for Cingular would be to tell their
    customers their phones would be shut off in thirty days, and that they
    could replace them at any Cingular store for full retail price.

    --
    "Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day,
    they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally.
    I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine."
    -- Bill Gates, in an interview with Newsweek's Steven Levy



  10. #25
    clifto
    Guest

    Re: gps mobile tracking

    SMS wrote:
    > Todd Allcock wrote:
    >> No, actually John was partially correct- the GSM locator system he
    >> referenced is in use by Cingular and T-Mobile and provides accuracy
    >> _up_to_ 50 meters. Just not 95% of the time.

    >
    > Right, that's what I said. "Cingular and T-Mobile use a less accurate
    > positioning system, called TDOA, which is accurate to about 350 feet (at
    > least 95% of the time)."
    >
    > TruePosition's U-TDOA Location Solution Provides High Accuracy ...
    > within 47.1 meters 67% of the time, and within 112.2 meters 95% of the time.


    So they can place you within a 6700 square foot area sometimes, but usually
    more like within 33,876 square feet. Great in those supermarket parking
    lots and hillside forested areas. I suppose it's better than nothing, but
    it sure looks like one of those situations where the cheapest thing that
    sorta kinda looks like it works is adopted.

    Not that the assisted GPS is any better in a rollover accident. I
    remember the time I watched my GPS as my apartment building flew at
    650 MPH from a suburb of Chicago to somewhere south of Lafayette IN,
    and the GPS quit when the building hit the GPS limit of 100,000 feet
    altitude (incomplete view of the sky and the satellite constellation).

    --
    "Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day,
    they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally.
    I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine."
    -- Bill Gates, in an interview with Newsweek's Steven Levy



  • Similar Threads




  • Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12