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  1. #1
    4phun
    Guest
    MobileMe
    A new service for your iPhone, iPod touch, Mac, and PC

    Look for MobileMe in your Microsoft Windows Control Panel on your PC.




    See More: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC




  2. #2
    Ron
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 05:33:06 -0700 (PDT), 4phun <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >MobileMe
    >A new service for your iPhone, iPod touch, Mac, and PC
    >
    >Look for MobileMe in your Microsoft Windows Control Panel on your PC.



    Never sawe the value in paying for another email service, when it has
    peported reliability issues.

    GMAIL is free, and email can now be pulled via a POP client, or their
    web client is excellent. Does a marvelous job of SPAM filtering too.

    Originally Apple also provided AntiVitus, then dropped that a few
    years back.



  3. #3
    4phun
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    On Jul 22, 8:47*am, Ron <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 05:33:06 -0700 (PDT), 4phun <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >MobileMe
    > >A new service for your iPhone, iPod touch, Mac, and PC

    >
    > >Look for MobileMe in your Microsoft Windows Control Panel on your PC.

    >
    > Never sawe the value in paying for another email service, when it has
    > peported reliability issues.
    >
    > GMAIL is free, and email can now be pulled via a POP client, or their
    > web client is excellent. Does a marvelous job of SPAM filtering too.
    >
    > Originally Apple also provided AntiVitus, then dropped that a few
    > years back.


    I agree. Gmail is very powerful, especially if you checkout its new
    advanced features.



  4. #4
    Carl
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    Ron wrote:
    > On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 05:33:06 -0700 (PDT), 4phun <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> MobileMe
    >> A new service for your iPhone, iPod touch, Mac, and PC
    >>
    >> Look for MobileMe in your Microsoft Windows Control Panel on your PC.

    >
    >
    > Never sawe the value in paying for another email service, when it has
    > peported reliability issues.
    >
    > GMAIL is free, and email can now be pulled via a POP client, or their
    > web client is excellent. Does a marvelous job of SPAM filtering too.
    >
    > Originally Apple also provided AntiVitus, then dropped that a few
    > years back.
    >

    Mobileme is not an email service. It's a push- service for coordinating
    changes on all Apple devices at once, email, calendar, and address book.
    It's actually a great idea, but currently a little expensive at $100/year.





  5. #5
    Larry
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    "Carl" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Mobileme is not an email service. It's a push- service for
    > coordinating changes on all Apple devices at once, email, calendar,
    > and address book. It's actually a great idea, but currently a little
    > expensive at $100/year.
    >
    >


    We "others" don't need a push client. Our computers are multitasking and
    fully capable of checking all those services on their own without the
    browser push crapware.....




  6. #6

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    On Jul 22, 10:22*am, "Carl" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Mobileme is not an email service. It's a push- service for coordinating
    > changes on all Apple devices at once, email, calendar, and address book.
    > It's actually a great idea, but currently a little expensive at $100/year..


    Especially since free alternatives exist, e.g. google calendar sync.
    I've never really understood the marketing froth about push services.
    If I want to go look at my contacts list, I have to open the app to
    look at it anyway. Same with calendar. Same with email; periodic
    checking is fine for me.



  7. #7
    Carl
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Jul 22, 10:22 am, "Carl" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Mobileme is not an email service. It's a push- service for
    >> coordinating changes on all Apple devices at once, email, calendar,
    >> and address book. It's actually a great idea, but currently a little
    >> expensive at $100/year.

    >
    > Especially since free alternatives exist, e.g. google calendar sync.
    > I've never really understood the marketing froth about push services.
    > If I want to go look at my contacts list, I have to open the app to
    > look at it anyway. Same with calendar. Same with email; periodic
    > checking is fine for me.
    >

    Well, there are people who use multiple devices. Let's say a PDA, laptop and
    desktop, perhaps a smartphone. And they want their changes updated on all of
    them but don't want to sync each manually because that becomes a monumental
    task to attend to everyday. Now perhaps they want to continue using a
    standardized program such as MS Outlook and don't want to switch over to
    Google calendar. People like that would appreciate a push service like
    Mobileme.

    Does google calendar actually appear on your devices or do you have to
    access the internet everytime you want to check it? If the latter, that
    would be a huge drawback to me anyway. If I want to check my appointments, I
    don't want to first have to access the internet.

    Just some thoughts.





  8. #8
    John B. Coarsey, PE
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC


    "Larry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Carl" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Mobileme is not an email service. It's a push- service for
    >> coordinating changes on all Apple devices at once, email, calendar,
    >> and address book. It's actually a great idea, but currently a little
    >> expensive at $100/year.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > We "others" don't need a push client. Our computers are multitasking and
    > fully capable of checking all those services on their own without the
    > browser push crapware.....


    as is the iphone





  9. #9
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC


    "Carl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >>> Mobileme is not an email service. It's a push- service for
    >>> coordinating changes on all Apple devices at once, email, calendar,
    >>> and address book. It's actually a great idea, but currently a little
    >>> expensive at $100/year.

    >>
    >> Especially since free alternatives exist, e.g. google calendar sync.
    >> I've never really understood the marketing froth about push services.
    >> If I want to go look at my contacts list, I have to open the app to
    >> look at it anyway. Same with calendar. Same with email; periodic
    >> checking is fine for me.

    >
    > Well, there are people who use multiple devices. Let's say a PDA, laptop
    > and desktop, perhaps a smartphone. And they want their changes updated on
    > all of them but don't want to sync each manually because that becomes a
    > monumental task to attend to everyday. Now perhaps they want to continue
    > using a standardized program such as MS Outlook and don't want to switch
    > over to Google calendar. People like that would appreciate a push service
    > like Mobileme.


    I think zws is reffering to the "push" aspect rather than the sync aspect.
    For MOST people, scheduled "pulling" is good enough. With respect to
    synching calendar, contacts, and tasks, my mobile devices, desktop and
    laptop PCs sync Outlook Contacts and Calendar info with a Funambol SyncML
    server every few hours. Most of my e-mail accounts sync hourly (or two) on
    my mobile (on a 2G network like T-Mobile's or with the original iPhone, data
    and voice can not occur simultaneously- too much pulling and pushing
    increases the odds that a voice call can't get through because the phone is
    busy with data and the call rolls right to voice mail.

    I use one push e-mail account, but that's mostly used for my Visual
    Voicemail. I'd rather have a voicemail from a missed call immediately
    rather than 5, 15, or 60 minutes later. ;-)

    > Does google calendar actually appear on your devices or do you have to
    > access the internet everytime you want to check it? If the latter, that
    > would be a huge drawback to me anyway. If I want to check my appointments,
    > I don't want to first have to access the internet.


    There are plenty of Outlook sync plug-ins for Google Clendar and Contacts
    that work with desktops and mobiles. Goosync and Oggsync come to mind- they
    periodically connect and sync the device/PC to the Google cloud info.
    Another good example of a "poor man's Exchange server" like the Funambol
    software I use. Both also have the advantage of being more platform
    agnostic than Exchange. Exchange is great, but what if you want to sync
    that info with your Nokia Symbian device, or your plain old Motorola Razr?
    That's where Exchange alternatives like Google Calendar/Contacts, Plaxo, or
    Funambol start to shine.





  10. #10
    Carl
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    Todd Allcock wrote:
    > "Carl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>>> Mobileme is not an email service. It's a push- service for
    >>>> coordinating changes on all Apple devices at once, email, calendar,
    >>>> and address book. It's actually a great idea, but currently a
    >>>> little expensive at $100/year.
    >>>
    >>> Especially since free alternatives exist, e.g. google calendar sync.
    >>> I've never really understood the marketing froth about push
    >>> services. If I want to go look at my contacts list, I have to open
    >>> the app to look at it anyway. Same with calendar. Same with email;
    >>> periodic checking is fine for me.

    >>
    >> Well, there are people who use multiple devices. Let's say a PDA,
    >> laptop and desktop, perhaps a smartphone. And they want their
    >> changes updated on all of them but don't want to sync each manually
    >> because that becomes a monumental task to attend to everyday. Now
    >> perhaps they want to continue using a standardized program such as
    >> MS Outlook and don't want to switch over to Google calendar. People
    >> like that would appreciate a push service like Mobileme.

    >
    > I think zws is reffering to the "push" aspect rather than the sync
    > aspect. For MOST people, scheduled "pulling" is good enough. With
    > respect to synching calendar, contacts, and tasks, my mobile devices,
    > desktop and laptop PCs sync Outlook Contacts and Calendar info with a
    > Funambol SyncML server every few hours. Most of my e-mail accounts
    > sync hourly (or two) on my mobile (on a 2G network like T-Mobile's or
    > with the original iPhone, data and voice can not occur
    > simultaneously- too much pulling and pushing increases the odds that
    > a voice call can't get through because the phone is busy with data
    > and the call rolls right to voice mail.
    > I use one push e-mail account, but that's mostly used for my Visual
    > Voicemail. I'd rather have a voicemail from a missed call immediately
    > rather than 5, 15, or 60 minutes later. ;-)
    >
    >> Does google calendar actually appear on your devices or do you have
    >> to access the internet everytime you want to check it? If the
    >> latter, that would be a huge drawback to me anyway. If I want to
    >> check my appointments, I don't want to first have to access the
    >> internet.

    >
    > There are plenty of Outlook sync plug-ins for Google Clendar and
    > Contacts that work with desktops and mobiles. Goosync and Oggsync
    > come to mind- they periodically connect and sync the device/PC to the
    > Google cloud info. Another good example of a "poor man's Exchange
    > server" like the Funambol software I use. Both also have the
    > advantage of being more platform agnostic than Exchange. Exchange is
    > great, but what if you want to sync that info with your Nokia Symbian
    > device, or your plain old Motorola Razr? That's where Exchange
    > alternatives like Google Calendar/Contacts, Plaxo, or Funambol start
    > to shine.

    As usual, thanks for all the useful, and well-informed, information.





  11. #11
    Scott Seidman
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    Ron <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > GMAIL is free, and email can now be pulled via a POP client, or their
    > web client is excellent. Does a marvelous job of SPAM filtering too.
    >


    Nothing in a gmail account can be considered confidential.

    --
    Scott
    Reverse name to reply



  12. #12
    Kevin Weaver
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC


    "Scott Seidman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Ron <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> GMAIL is free, and email can now be pulled via a POP client, or their
    >> web client is excellent. Does a marvelous job of SPAM filtering too.
    >>

    >
    > Nothing in a gmail account can be considered confidential.
    >
    > --
    > Scott
    > Reverse name to reply


    That goes for any E-mail account. Not just Gmail.




  13. #13
    Scott Seidman
    Guest

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    "Kevin Weaver" <[email protected]> wrote in newsQohk.6434
    [email protected]:

    > That goes for any E-mail account. Not just Gmail.


    Obviously, but in-house corporate email done right is usually kept in-
    house, though you should assume it can be read in house.

    Gmail is specifically mined for targeting ads. You KNOW its being read.

    --
    Scott
    Reverse name to reply



  14. #14

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    On Jul 22, 12:57*pm, "Todd Allcock" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > > Well, there are people who use multiple devices. Let's say a PDA, laptop
    > > and desktop, perhaps a smartphone. And they want their changes updated on
    > > all of them but don't want to sync each manually because that becomes a

    >
    > I think zws is reffering to the "push" aspect rather than the sync aspect..
    > For MOST people, scheduled "pulling" is good enough. *With respect to


    Exactly what I meant. Typically I only have one device actually with
    me - two at most (cellphone and laptop). A half-hour, or even an hour
    or two of lag between when I input it on one device and when it
    appears on others is no big deal to me - there's no possibility of
    confusion because I'm not physically near the out-of-sync devices.

    > and voice can not occur simultaneously- too much pulling and pushing
    > increases the odds that a voice call can't get through because the phone is
    > busy with data and the call rolls right to voice mail.


    I thought a voice call would automatically kill an EDGE/GPRS session
    and take priority.



  15. #15

    Re: MobileMe | A new service for your iPhone and PC

    On Jul 22, 1:24*pm, Scott Seidman <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > GMAIL is free, and email can now be pulled via a POP client, or their
    > > web client is excellent. Does a marvelous job of SPAM filtering too.

    >
    > Nothing in a gmail account can be considered confidential.


    Nothing sent in plaintext can be considered confidential, because the
    backbone is tapped; if you have privacy concerns, use strong
    encryption.

    If you have anything that's really important enough to protect from
    "them", you also need to control the type of hardware and software
    your intended recipient will use to read the decrypted ciphertext
    (TEMPEST, etc). There has even been some very good work done in
    reconstructing screen contents by photographing the backscatter off a
    wall behind the monitor.




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