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  1. #1
    Jeff
    Guest
    Hello Nextel Users:

    I am new to the Nextel world and have a few questions about Nextel's
    technology, especially related to Direct Connect.

    First, my assumption is that Direct Connect radio transmissions are
    routed via relays (probably not the correct technical term) that are on
    the cell towers. A second assumption is that the phones cannot DC
    directly to each other without the relay. In other words, they can't act
    like FRS radios.

    If both of those assumptions are correct (and its very likely they
    aren't), how is it that Nextels have a reputation for working during
    disasters and power outages when other mobile phones don't?

    If the Nextels can't communicate without relays, then the phones
    wouldn't work if the relays lost power, correct? I actually hope I am
    wrong about this, but I don't know how it would work otherwise.




    See More: Nextel Technology Questions




  2. #2
    Bob
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Technology Questions

    The new generation of phones will or may already have the capability of
    acting like a FRS radio - ie: no need for the system to be there to D/C -
    but that would be very short distance.

    Why would nextel work during emergency?

    -- generators (all cell co's do this)
    -- portablle base stations (COWS) (all Cells do this also)
    -- prioritizing users so those that need D/C have priority over the
    average user.

    or perhaps nextel would not work in certain scenraios in certain locales.
    Don't think nextel is any better or worse than any other carrier.


    "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello Nextel Users:
    >
    > I am new to the Nextel world and have a few questions about Nextel's
    > technology, especially related to Direct Connect.
    >
    > First, my assumption is that Direct Connect radio transmissions are
    > routed via relays (probably not the correct technical term) that are on
    > the cell towers. A second assumption is that the phones cannot DC
    > directly to each other without the relay. In other words, they can't act
    > like FRS radios.
    >
    > If both of those assumptions are correct (and its very likely they
    > aren't), how is it that Nextels have a reputation for working during
    > disasters and power outages when other mobile phones don't?
    >
    > If the Nextels can't communicate without relays, then the phones
    > wouldn't work if the relays lost power, correct? I actually hope I am
    > wrong about this, but I don't know how it would work otherwise.
    >






  3. #3
    Scott Stephenson
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Technology Questions


    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The new generation of phones will or may already have the capability of
    > acting like a FRS radio - ie: no need for the system to be there to D/C -
    > but that would be very short distance.


    Yeah- I'm not quite sure on this one myself. I think that they have
    released one model so far, with more to come.

    >
    > Why would nextel work during emergency?
    >
    > -- generators (all cell co's do this)
    > -- portablle base stations (COWS) (all Cells do this also)
    > -- prioritizing users so those that need D/C have priority over the
    > average user.
    >
    > or perhaps nextel would not work in certain scenraios in certain locales.
    > Don't think nextel is any better or worse than any other carrier.


    Agreed. I think they get their share of the press because they do have a
    lot of rapid response groups under contract, and do a good job of
    prioritizing these customers in an emergency. One thing they do that I
    haven't heard the others do- in an emergency, they drag out a boat load of
    used phones and pass them out to the Emergency Services groups to use during
    the crisis. On 9/11, I know they passed out thousands of phones, and
    didn't charge for the usage on those phones.





  4. #4
    MarkF
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Technology Questions

    Jeff <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hello Nextel Users:
    >
    > I am new to the Nextel world and have a few questions about Nextel's
    > technology, especially related to Direct Connect.
    >
    > First, my assumption is that Direct Connect radio transmissions are
    > routed via relays (probably not the correct technical term) that are on
    > the cell towers. A second assumption is that the phones cannot DC
    > directly to each other without the relay. In other words, they can't act
    > like FRS radios.


    That is correct, the current NEXTEL phones can't work without an
    infractructure to talk to. The iDEN platform is no different than any
    other, if it doesn't see a control channel the handset goes stupid.

    >
    > If both of those assumptions are correct (and its very likely they
    > aren't), how is it that Nextels have a reputation for working during
    > disasters and power outages when other mobile phones don't?


    This is because the trunking platform is very efficient. An average
    PTT call is 5 to 6 seconds and only uses one frequency/time slot at
    different tower sites where a cellular call could go minutes at a time
    and tie up much more channel resources. All this boils down to system
    efficiency. A similiar platform is used on Public Safety trunking
    systems and both are Motorola designed products...they truly invented
    and perfected PTT, NEXTEL is only a provider and didn't invent the
    technology, although they wished that they did.

    >
    > If the Nextels can't communicate without relays, then the phones
    > wouldn't work if the relays lost power, correct? I actually hope I am
    > wrong about this, but I don't know how it would work otherwise.



    NEXTEL, as any other wireless provider, needs to evaluate the back-up
    power requirements at their sites carefully. Most utilize batteries
    and during extended back-out periods usually bring out a portable
    generator. It's costly and usually very difficult to place a
    generator at tower sites as a permanent installation due to LP gas
    setback requirements, environmental isses with diesel, as well as the
    space requirements for the tanks and gen set, so most just do it on an
    as-needed basis.

    NEXTEL is getting ready to deploy a handset with simplex communication
    capabilities. I don't know what frequency they are going to use and
    it will be interesting to see how they do it.

    Mark



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