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  1. #1
    Rich
    Guest
    I just posted this to alt.cellular and then found this group.. which I think
    this message belongs in..... please see my question below:

    I just bought a couple i710 phones with Nextel and whenever the phone is on
    I hear a clicking sound in my computer speakers and my monitor goes
    completely wild (horizontal lines) when I am speaking with someone on the
    i710.

    I used to have a Cricket phone and never had a problem with this around
    speakers or computer monitors.

    Cricket works at 1900Mhz while Nextel works at 800Mhz. I suppose this has
    something to do with the static I'm hearing/seeing.

    Here is my question. I don't know a lot about this... or how this works, but
    is the Nextel phone outputting more hazardous radiation if I am able to see
    the static in the monitor and hear the static in my speakers?

    I just plunked out a lot of money for these phones and had absolutely no
    idea they caused interference like this. I hope I am not exposing myself to
    more radiation than I had with my old cell phone.





    See More: Question about Nextel 800MHz enterference




  2. #2
    Evan Platt
    Guest

    Re: Question about Nextel 800MHz enterference

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 23:04:09 -0700, "Rich" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I just posted this to alt.cellular and then found this group.. which I think
    >this message belongs in..... please see my question below:
    >
    >I just bought a couple i710 phones with Nextel and whenever the phone is on
    >I hear a clicking sound in my computer speakers and my monitor goes
    >completely wild (horizontal lines) when I am speaking with someone on the
    >i710.
    >
    >I used to have a Cricket phone and never had a problem with this around
    >speakers or computer monitors.
    >
    >Cricket works at 1900Mhz while Nextel works at 800Mhz. I suppose this has
    >something to do with the static I'm hearing/seeing.
    >
    >Here is my question. I don't know a lot about this... or how this works, but
    >is the Nextel phone outputting more hazardous radiation if I am able to see
    >the static in the monitor and hear the static in my speakers?
    >
    >I just plunked out a lot of money for these phones and had absolutely no
    >idea they caused interference like this. I hope I am not exposing myself to
    >more radiation than I had with my old cell phone.


    The clicking is the phone transmitting to the tower. Nextel is famous
    for this.

    As to radiation.... Wear a tin foil hat.
    --
    To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.




  3. #3
    Rich
    Guest

    Re: Question about Nextel 800MHz enterference


    "Evan Platt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 23:04:09 -0700, "Rich" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I just posted this to alt.cellular and then found this group.. which I

    think
    > >this message belongs in..... please see my question below:
    > >
    > >I just bought a couple i710 phones with Nextel and whenever the phone is

    on
    > >I hear a clicking sound in my computer speakers and my monitor goes
    > >completely wild (horizontal lines) when I am speaking with someone on the
    > >i710.
    > >
    > >I used to have a Cricket phone and never had a problem with this around
    > >speakers or computer monitors.
    > >
    > >Cricket works at 1900Mhz while Nextel works at 800Mhz. I suppose this has
    > >something to do with the static I'm hearing/seeing.
    > >
    > >Here is my question. I don't know a lot about this... or how this works,

    but
    > >is the Nextel phone outputting more hazardous radiation if I am able to

    see
    > >the static in the monitor and hear the static in my speakers?
    > >
    > >I just plunked out a lot of money for these phones and had absolutely no
    > >idea they caused interference like this. I hope I am not exposing myself

    to
    > >more radiation than I had with my old cell phone.

    >
    > The clicking is the phone transmitting to the tower. Nextel is famous
    > for this.
    >
    > As to radiation.... Wear a tin foil hat.


    Someone in another group suggested it is GSM vs CDMA.. does one emit more
    radiation than the other??





  4. #4
    Richard Ness
    Guest

    Re: Question about Nextel 800MHz enterference

    Nextel uses iDEN, which is also based on the same principals as GSM and TDMA .
    Meaning that they use a TIME based digital modulation scheme. NON continuous TX...

    What you are hearing is the TX (transmitter) pulsing as it just transmits during it's time slot.
    So, it's not the frequency the phone is operating at, it's the (TDMA) digital scheme it's using.

    Your Cricket uses CDMA, which is a spread spectrum transmission, less likely to
    cause RFI (radio frequency interference) in close proximity devices.

    One could speculate that there is the possibility that at 1900MHz, the pulsing TX of an
    iDEN or other TDMA based device would cause less RFI because of the shorter wavelengths.
    ERP being the same.



    "Rich" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >I just posted this to alt.cellular and then found this group.. which I think
    > this message belongs in..... please see my question below:
    >
    > I just bought a couple i710 phones with Nextel and whenever the phone is on
    > I hear a clicking sound in my computer speakers and my monitor goes
    > completely wild (horizontal lines) when I am speaking with someone on the
    > i710.
    >
    > I used to have a Cricket phone and never had a problem with this around
    > speakers or computer monitors.
    >
    > Cricket works at 1900Mhz while Nextel works at 800Mhz. I suppose this has
    > something to do with the static I'm hearing/seeing.
    >
    > Here is my question. I don't know a lot about this... or how this works, but
    > is the Nextel phone outputting more hazardous radiation if I am able to see
    > the static in the monitor and hear the static in my speakers?
    >
    > I just plunked out a lot of money for these phones and had absolutely no
    > idea they caused interference like this. I hope I am not exposing myself to
    > more radiation than I had with my old cell phone.
    >
    >






  5. #5
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Question about Nextel 800MHz enterference

    Rich wrote:

    > Someone in another group suggested it is GSM vs CDMA.. does one emit more
    > radiation than the other??


    Nextel is neither GSM nor CDMA. iDEN is a hybrid two-way/cellular protocol
    based on TDMA. (GSM is also based on TDMA, but isn't the same protocol.)


    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
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    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
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  6. #6
    KE4QPF
    KE4QPF is offline
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    Re: Re: Question about Nextel 800MHz enterference

    Originally posted by Steve Sobol
    Rich wrote:

    > Someone in another group suggested it is GSM vs CDMA.. does one emit more
    > radiation than the other??


    Nextel is neither GSM nor CDMA. iDEN is a hybrid two-way/cellular protocol
    based on TDMA. (GSM is also based on TDMA, but isn't the same protocol.)

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / [email protected]
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
    KE4QPF writes:

    Courtesy - http://idenphones.motorola.com/idenH...at_is_iden.jsp

    TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access):
    iDEN's digital technology divides a channel into different "slots". Each slot can carry one voice or data transmission. By deploying an iDEN system, service providers can increase capacity by as much as six times their current analog Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR) network.

    This capacity increase is accomplished using a state-of-the-art technology called TDMA. TDMA utilizes Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) to reference a synchronized time, and then divides the channel into time slots. As a result, channel capacity is increased because one channel has now been converted to multiple voice or data transmission vehicles. TDMA is a proven technology in cellular systems across Europe, the US, and in Japan. iDEN utilizes TDMA for Maximum Spectrum Efficiency.

    VSELP (Vector Sum Excited Linear Prediction):
    VSELP digitally codes and significantly compresses voice signals, increasing radio channel capacity by reducing the amount of information that needs to be transmitted. VSELP provides iDEN systems with the capability to fit voice transmission into the smaller transmissions vehicle that results from TDMA.

    QAM (Quad Amplitude Modulation):
    Quad Amplitude Modulation results in 64 kbps data rate over a 25 kHz channel.
    Last edited by KE4QPF; 01-03-2005 at 03:29 PM.



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