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  1. #1
    PDA Man
    Guest
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2003Sep27.html



    "PDA Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > washingtonpost.com
    > Focus on the Big Picture: Where the Phone Works
    >
    >
    > By Rob Pegoraro
    >
    > Sunday, September 28, 2003; Page F01
    >
    >
    > Getting a cell phone should be simple.
    >
    > But competitive markets that run on rapidly evolving technologies rarely
    > are. Picking a wireless-phone service demands a lot of homework, between

    the
    > fine-print-laden price plans, the varied coverage areas and all the

    add-ons
    > packaged with voice service, such as text messaging and Web access.
    >
    > It's easy to focus on the one thing you can instinctively grasp: the phone
    > itself. But that's a mistake. A cell phone's job is to let you talk to
    > people, not take pictures or play MP3s. And that happens only where the
    > phone gets a clear signal.
    >
    > The most important thing to gawk at in a wireless carrier's brochure or on
    > its Web site is not the catalogue of phones. Nor is it even the price

    plans.
    > Instead, inspect the coverage maps -- both of them.
    >
    > First, eyeball the map of the Washington area to see the carrier's digital
    > reach. None of the six firms doing business here (AT&T Wireless, Cingular
    > Wireless, Nextel, Sprint PCS, T-Mobile USA and Verizon Wireless) cover all
    > of it. Cingular leaves out the Eastern Shore, Verizon hits a wall west of
    > the Blue Ridge, AT&T omits a generous chunk of Charles County, and so on.
    > (Don't forget to ask neighbors and co-workers which services they like.)
    >
    > Then look at the carrier's nationwide map. You'll see immense gaps that

    may
    > overlap the roads you take and the places they lead you to, whether it's a
    > college, a beach house or Grandma's house.
    >
    > The second issue to ponder is a wireless carrier's digital dialect. Four
    > technologies are in use: CDMA ("Code Division Multiple Access," offered by
    > Sprint and Verizon), GSM ("Global System for Mobile communication,"

    offered
    > by AT&T, T-Mobile and soon Cingular), iDEN (Nextel's "Integrated Digital
    > Enhanced Network"), and TDMA ("Time Division Multiple Access," sold by

    AT&T
    > and Cingular).
    >
    > I've written before that, since these standards all provide about the same
    > voice quality, the differences among them don't matter. That's no longer
    > true.
    >
    > Rest of Full Story http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/w...anguage=printer
    >
    > Vist my new WEBSITE for PALM/PDA Users http://PalmPlace.blogspot.com WIN A
    > FREE ALUMINUM PALM /CLIE CASE . Ends Midnite on Tuesday
    >
    >
    >






    See More: UPDATED LINK For Full Story




  2. #2
    PDA Man
    Guest

    Re: UPDATED LINK For Full Story

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2003Sep27.html



    "PDA Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > washingtonpost.com
    > Focus on the Big Picture: Where the Phone Works
    >
    >
    > By Rob Pegoraro
    >
    > Sunday, September 28, 2003; Page F01
    >
    >
    > Getting a cell phone should be simple.
    >
    > But competitive markets that run on rapidly evolving technologies rarely
    > are. Picking a wireless-phone service demands a lot of homework, between

    the
    > fine-print-laden price plans, the varied coverage areas and all the

    add-ons
    > packaged with voice service, such as text messaging and Web access.
    >
    > It's easy to focus on the one thing you can instinctively grasp: the phone
    > itself. But that's a mistake. A cell phone's job is to let you talk to
    > people, not take pictures or play MP3s. And that happens only where the
    > phone gets a clear signal.
    >
    > The most important thing to gawk at in a wireless carrier's brochure or on
    > its Web site is not the catalogue of phones. Nor is it even the price

    plans.
    > Instead, inspect the coverage maps -- both of them.
    >
    > First, eyeball the map of the Washington area to see the carrier's digital
    > reach. None of the six firms doing business here (AT&T Wireless, Cingular
    > Wireless, Nextel, Sprint PCS, T-Mobile USA and Verizon Wireless) cover all
    > of it. Cingular leaves out the Eastern Shore, Verizon hits a wall west of
    > the Blue Ridge, AT&T omits a generous chunk of Charles County, and so on.
    > (Don't forget to ask neighbors and co-workers which services they like.)
    >
    > Then look at the carrier's nationwide map. You'll see immense gaps that

    may
    > overlap the roads you take and the places they lead you to, whether it's a
    > college, a beach house or Grandma's house.
    >
    > The second issue to ponder is a wireless carrier's digital dialect. Four
    > technologies are in use: CDMA ("Code Division Multiple Access," offered by
    > Sprint and Verizon), GSM ("Global System for Mobile communication,"

    offered
    > by AT&T, T-Mobile and soon Cingular), iDEN (Nextel's "Integrated Digital
    > Enhanced Network"), and TDMA ("Time Division Multiple Access," sold by

    AT&T
    > and Cingular).
    >
    > I've written before that, since these standards all provide about the same
    > voice quality, the differences among them don't matter. That's no longer
    > true.
    >
    > Rest of Full Story http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/w...anguage=printer
    >
    > Vist my new WEBSITE for PALM/PDA Users http://PalmPlace.blogspot.com WIN A
    > FREE ALUMINUM PALM /CLIE CASE . Ends Midnite on Tuesday
    >
    >
    >






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