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  1. #1
    Spyforce
    Guest


    Looking to ensure that your cellphone calls are secure from
    eavesdropping?
    Drop me and email and I will send you a pDF file on how you can secure
    your cell phone calls.
    [email protected]



    See More: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?




  2. #2
    Jon
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    Spyforce posted the following for all to hear...
    > Looking to ensure that your cellphone calls are secure from
    > eavesdropping?


    No, they already are.
    --
    www.unlockingshop.co.uk
    change 'spam' to 'info' to email
    SonyEricsson T610 unlock/unbrand - 15
    Sagem DIY remote unlocking available - see site for details



  3. #3
    Kjetil R. Hetland
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?


    "Jon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Spyforce posted the following for all to hear...
    > > Looking to ensure that your cellphone calls are secure from
    > > eavesdropping?

    >
    > No, they already are.


    could you please explain that a bit more ?? (reference.. ?)

    Kjetil


    > www.unlockingshop.co.uk
    > change 'spam' to 'info' to email
    > SonyEricsson T610 unlock/unbrand - 15
    > Sagem DIY remote unlocking available - see site for details






  4. #4

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 23:28:36 +0100, "Kjetil R. Hetland"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >could you please explain that a bit more


    You could start at http://www.mobileshop.org/howitworks/encryption.htm
    for a fairly non-technical overview.

    --

    Iain
    the out-of-date hairydog guide to mobile phones
    http://www.hairydog.co.uk/cell1.html
    Browse now while stocks last!



  5. #5
    Jesse McGrew
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    Kjetil R. Hetland wrote:
    > "Jon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Spyforce posted the following for all to hear...
    >>
    >>>Looking to ensure that your cellphone calls are secure from
    >>>eavesdropping?

    >>
    >>No, they already are.

    >
    >
    > could you please explain that a bit more ?? (reference.. ?)
    >


    Those of us who use CDMA don't have to worry about eavesdropping over
    the air. Of course, the powers-that-be can still listen to calls by
    placing a tap at the phone company.

    Jesse



  6. #6
    CharlesH
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 23:28:36 +0100, "Kjetil R. Hetland"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>could you please explain that a bit more

    >
    >You could start at http://www.mobileshop.org/howitworks/encryption.htm
    >for a fairly non-technical overview.


    While the crossposting list is pretty much exclusively GSM, and security
    on GSM is discussed in the above Web site, I just wanted to describe how
    CDMA does it. The CDMA protocol uses the mobile's ESN (= GSM IMEI) in its
    spreading algorithm for the traffic from the mobile to the cell site. The
    result is that this traffic is pretty much indistinguishable from white
    noise if you don't know the ESN; you not only cannot decode it, you can't
    even find it. The mobile knows its own ESN, and the system looks it up
    in its database from the MIN (Mobile Identification Number = GSM IMSI).
    The ESN is never transmitted. With CDMA, the encryption is part
    of the protocol, not a separate step. I believe the CDMA "encryption"
    is secure against anything short of government cryptography agencies.



  7. #7
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    CharlesH wrote:

    > While the crossposting list is pretty much exclusively GSM, and security
    > on GSM is discussed in the above Web site, I just wanted to describe how
    > CDMA does it. The CDMA protocol uses the mobile's ESN (= GSM IMEI) in its
    > spreading algorithm for the traffic from the mobile to the cell site. The
    > result is that this traffic is pretty much indistinguishable from white
    > noise if you don't know the ESN; you not only cannot decode it, you can't
    > even find it. The mobile knows its own ESN, and the system looks it up
    > in its database from the MIN (Mobile Identification Number = GSM IMSI).
    > The ESN is never transmitted. With CDMA, the encryption is part
    > of the protocol, not a separate step. I believe the CDMA "encryption"
    > is secure against anything short of government cryptography agencies.


    When the government has a Title III warrant, they have access to the
    same ESN database as the carrier - then they can do whatever the hell
    they want to do, air side or wire side. The only reason their
    cryptographers need get involved is when they don't have a warrant.
    Considering the way the Patriot Act is written and/or interpreted, I
    imagine the crypto department is as busy as the war chalkers, and having
    twice the fun.


    --
    jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
    "All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
    what we know." -- Richard Wilbur




  8. #8
    DevilsPGD
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    In message <<[email protected]>> [email protected]lid
    (CharlesH) did ramble:

    >The ESN is never transmitted. With CDMA, the encryption is part
    >of the protocol, not a separate step. I believe the CDMA "encryption"
    >is secure against anything short of government cryptography agencies.


    Generally probably true. However, the government wouldn't bother, they
    can tap it from the cellular network directly (rather then over the air)




  9. #9
    David L
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    DevilsPGD <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In message <<[email protected]>> [email protected]lid
    > (CharlesH) did ramble:
    >
    > >The ESN is never transmitted. With CDMA, the encryption is part
    > >of the protocol, not a separate step. I believe the CDMA "encryption"
    > >is secure against anything short of government cryptography agencies.

    >
    > Generally probably true. However, the government wouldn't bother, they
    > can tap it from the cellular network directly (rather then over the air)


    The latest wire tap investigation rules include "roving wiretaps".
    Used in cases, where the person of interest, changes phones...
    payphones and/or multiple wireless phones, like prepaids, whose
    ownership cannot be traced.

    I'm guessing... the one common thread in such a case would be tracking
    through a voice print or directly intercepting target communications,
    in the field, through electronic amplification of calls and in the
    case of wireless, whatever data keys too.
    It's obvious, if the cdma call data can be recorded, it would be easy
    to decode for content, later.

    Perhaps part of the survelliance process, includes quickly identifying
    which line at the CO to record? Or instantly cloning the target phone
    to hear both sides of the conversation?

    Just curious if a roving wiretap can continue automatically, without
    agents tailing the individual?

    The method is likely a big secret, but the authorities can do
    it...somehow? Any ideas?

    -
    David



  10. #10
    tuned by RZO
    Guest

    Re: Are your cellphone calls secure from eavesdropping?

    "Jon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    | Spyforce posted the following for all to hear...
    | > Looking to ensure that your cellphone calls are secure from
    | > eavesdropping?
    |

    No, they already are; especially when you keep walking around (never sit
    still in a phonecall)