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  1. #16
    Mike Schumann
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    I wouldn't blame Cingular for that. I suspect that Nokia took the easy way
    out, and instead of coming out with a quad band phone, they adapted their
    existing tri-band design by switching the 900 frequency to 850. It's been
    VERY frustrating, that the market leader for so many years, is the last one
    on the planet coming out with quad band phones.

    Mike Schumann

    "Donald Newcomb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> It might be just me, but that sounds weird -- Why would they do that?

    >
    > It has to do with they way the carrier views their 1800 MHz spectrum. Some
    > mostly-900-MHz carriers use 1800 MHz just for spot coverage to increase
    > capacity in high usage areas. They make no attempt to provide continuous
    > 1800 MHz coverage. In this situation the only benefit of using 1800 MHz
    > control channels would be for the tiny revenue from the few roamers who
    > have
    > 1800-only phones. Remember that until quite recently, international phones
    > that didn't have 900 MHz were nonentities. The only 1800-only phones were
    > a
    > few old models from the early days when Orange and One2One (Now T-Mobile
    > UK)
    > were brand new. The only thing that even brings this discussion up again
    > is
    > Cingular's bizarre idea that it's good enough to send customers roaming
    > around the world with a phone without 900 MHz.
    >
    > --
    > Donald Newcomb
    > DRNewcomb (at) attglobal (dot) net
    >
    >






    See More: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?




  2. #17
    Donald Newcomb
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?


    "Mike Schumann" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    > I wouldn't blame Cingular for that.


    What I do blame Cingular for is leading their customers to believe that this
    is a "Global" phone.

    --
    Donald Newcomb
    DRNewcomb (at) attglobal (dot) net





  3. #18
    Mike S.
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?


    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mike Schumann <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I wouldn't blame Cingular for that. I suspect that Nokia took the easy way
    >out, and instead of coming out with a quad band phone, they adapted their
    >existing tri-band design by switching the 900 frequency to 850. It's been
    >VERY frustrating, that the market leader for so many years, is the last one
    >on the planet coming out with quad band phones.


    The Nokia 6270 is a quad-band GSM (800/900/1800/1900) phone.




  4. #19
    John Phillips
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    On Thu, 25 Aug 2005, at 14:45:22 [GMT +0000 (UTC)] (00:45:22 Friday, 26
    August 2005 where I live) "Mike S." wrote:

    > The Nokia 6270 is a quad-band GSM (800/900/1800/1900) phone.


    That's a bit of a "girls" phone. Any others that you know off?

    --
    When you do a good deed get a receipt, in case heaven is like the IRS.




  5. #20
    Mike S.
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?


    In article <[email protected]>,
    John Phillips <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Thu, 25 Aug 2005, at 14:45:22 [GMT +0000 (UTC)] (00:45:22 Friday, 26
    >August 2005 where I live) "Mike S." wrote:
    >
    >> The Nokia 6270 is a quad-band GSM (800/900/1800/1900) phone.

    >
    >That's a bit of a "girls" phone. Any others that you know off?


    That is the only 800/900/1800/1900 phone I'm aware of from Nokia. If
    you're looking for a quad-band "business" phone, go with Motorola.



  6. #21
    Stuart Friedman
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    I use a Motorola c975 for Japan. You can get them cheap in Europe and
    HK. They support UMTS plus GSM 900, 1800, 1900. They have EDGE and
    UMTS data, but no blue tooth. I don't use the phone in the US, but it
    is great for most places.

    Prepaid SIMs are hard to get in the Japan. Voda used to sell them, but
    you now need to have residency status to get a prepaid in Japan. You
    can rent a SIM at Narita, otherwise you are paying roaming.




  7. #22
    Ivor Jones
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?



    "DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In message <[email protected]> John
    > Phillips<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 18:32:06 [GMT +0200] (02:32:06
    > > Wednesday, 24 August 2005 where I live) "Wolfgang
    > > Barth" wrote:
    > >
    > > > > 3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900
    > > > Yes

    > >
    > > Actually may not - some networks "hide" the 1800 band
    > > and only hand over from the 900 band.

    >
    > It might be just me, but that sounds weird -- Why would
    > they do that?


    Because some networks only use 1800 as a fill-in to cover spots that the
    900 system can't see. Here in the UK O2 and Vodafone use 900 as the
    primary band with a sprinkling of low power fill-in cells using 1800.
    Orange and T-Mobile are entirely 1800 and have no 900 cells at all.

    Ivor





  8. #23
    Mike Schumann
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    It's not available yet.

    Mike Schumann

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mike Schumann <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I wouldn't blame Cingular for that. I suspect that Nokia took the easy
    >>way
    >>out, and instead of coming out with a quad band phone, they adapted their
    >>existing tri-band design by switching the 900 frequency to 850. It's been
    >>VERY frustrating, that the market leader for so many years, is the last
    >>one
    >>on the planet coming out with quad band phones.

    >
    > The Nokia 6270 is a quad-band GSM (800/900/1800/1900) phone.
    >






  9. #24
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    Mike Schumann wrote:
    > It's not available yet.
    >
    > Mike Schumann
    >
    > "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>Mike Schumann <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I wouldn't blame Cingular for that. I suspect that Nokia took the easy
    >>>way
    >>>out, and instead of coming out with a quad band phone, they adapted their
    >>>existing tri-band design by switching the 900 frequency to 850. It's been
    >>>VERY frustrating, that the market leader for so many years, is the last
    >>>one
    >>>on the planet coming out with quad band phones.

    >>
    >>The Nokia 6270 is a quad-band GSM (800/900/1800/1900) phone.


    I think that Nokia figured that the demand for quad band wasn't high
    enough to worry about.

    I travel a lot to Asia, as do most of my colleagues. We all have
    separate phones to use over there, because at most companies in this
    area (Silicon Valley), Verizon is the carrier of choice due to coverage
    issues with the GSM carriers.

    So we're forced to have a second phone for most of Asia, and Europe
    anyway, and we buy SIM cards, and use call forwarding to the number we
    get when we buy the SIM. Even in Korea, it's cheaper to rent a phone,
    and to do call-forwarding than to roam.

    One VP I had was so excited about his "world" phone, until he realized
    that it worked great in Beijing, but that it sucked in Santa Clara. His
    words were 'my wife can call me in Beijing, but not in Santa Clara.'

    The CDMA/GSM model, Samsung SCH-A790/A795 has proven to be the best
    choice for world travelers, since it's CDMA for North America and the
    other CDMA countries such as Korea, and now Japan, and GSM for the parts
    of the world that are GSM. So you get the best of all worlds, except of
    course no AMPS for the U.S..

    There is one NEC phone that will work on FOMA in Japan, as well as on
    GSM 900/1800/1900, but without GSM 800, it's not a true "world" phone.



  10. #25
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    Mike Schumann wrote:
    > It's not available yet.


    The Motorola V188, while not a terribly high-quality phone, is a quad-band
    GSM phone. Wifey and I both have V188s on T-Mo. The V188 is still in T-Mo's
    current phone lineup.

    I'm a little surprised you didn't post this to the T-Mo group.

    I didn't see the original post, but it looks like you posted to a data
    newsgroup too. The V188 is GPRS only, FWIW. Don't know if GPRS is functional
    while you are roaming, or using another carrier's SIM (if you are going to
    get a SIM, talk to T-Mo to get the SIM lock removed).

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



  11. #26
    Dogfart
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    On Sat, 12 Nov 2005, at 10:54:42 [GMT -0800] (05:54:42 Sunday, 13 November
    2005 where I live) "Steve Sobol" wrote:

    > The V188 is GPRS only, FWIW. Don't know if GPRS is functional
    > while you are roaming, or using another carrier's SIM


    Depends on the carrier. In Thailand for example no GPRS in the bush, only in
    Bangkok from certain providers. In China I can necer seem to get GPRS as
    well.

    However you can still use the phone anywhere there is a GSM signal, and of
    course the SIM card is enabled to that particular carrier, or better still
    you have an "unlocked" SIM and phone.

    Please also note a tri band phone 850-1800-1900 may not be able to pick up
    the 1800 band in some countries, due to some carriers "hiding" this
    frequency and only handing over from the 900 whatever they are called band;
    you are unable to log on to the 1800 frequency at all even though your phone
    has this ability.




  12. #27
    Donald Newcomb
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?


    "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I travel a lot to Asia, as do most of my colleagues. We all have
    > separate phones to use over there, because at most companies in this
    > area (Silicon Valley), Verizon is the carrier of choice due to coverage
    > issues with the GSM carriers.


    What's Verizon's problem with GSM roaming? You are using their global
    roaming service, right?

    > So we're forced to have a second phone for most of Asia, and Europe
    > anyway, and we buy SIM cards, and use call forwarding to the number we
    > get when we buy the SIM. Even in Korea, it's cheaper to rent a phone,
    > and to do call-forwarding than to roam.


    Yeah. That is a problem with roaming. The carriers just want to make a
    fortune off it. No one shops for a carrier based on their international
    roaming price list, so it becomes one of those, "if you must ask..." type
    items.

    > One VP I had was so excited about his "world" phone, until he realized
    > that it worked great in Beijing, but that it sucked in Santa Clara. His
    > words were 'my wife can call me in Beijing, but not in Santa Clara.'


    Does this VP have "pointy hair"?

    > The CDMA/GSM model, Samsung SCH-A790/A795 has proven to be the best
    > choice for world travelers, since it's CDMA for North America and the
    > other CDMA countries such as Korea, and now Japan, and GSM for the parts
    > of the world that are GSM. So you get the best of all worlds, except of
    > course no AMPS for the U.S..


    So these guys can't figure out how to use two different phones. They can
    only be trained on one device?

    > There is one NEC phone that will work on FOMA in Japan, as well as on
    > GSM 900/1800/1900, but without GSM 800, it's not a true "world" phone.


    There are several phone that do three GSM bands plus WCDMA-2100. I have a
    Moto A835 that I use when roaming in Japan. It's a brick and the battery
    life in WDCMA (Japan) mode is not very good, but it works and cost me less
    than $100, all told.

    Actually, I hear (read about) this issue with exceutive travelers and their
    obsession with a "world phone" (single device) that works everywhere. Often
    the issue is that they can't accept the idea of being trained on using more
    than one phone. Strange. Do they complain about the toilets and light
    switches overseas too?

    --
    Donald R. Newcomb
    DRNewcomb (at) attglobal (dot) net





  13. #28
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    Donald Newcomb wrote:
    > Actually, I hear (read about) this issue with exceutive travelers and their
    > obsession with a "world phone" (single device) that works everywhere. Often
    > the issue is that they can't accept the idea of being trained on using more
    > than one phone. Strange. Do they complain about the toilets and light
    > switches overseas too?


    Funny you should mention that. When I came here to Israel nine years ago
    it took a while to get used to the light switches being "upside down". You
    push them DOWN to turn on a light. Being the perverse guy I am, every time
    I replace a light switch, I put them back rightside up. So now half the
    switches in our apartment are push down to turn on, half are push up.

    No one seems to complain. :-)

    On the other hand the local standard toilets withpush small button for
    #1 and large button for #2 confuses everyone. I just gave up and always
    push the #2 button. :-)

    Geoff.


    --
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel [email protected] N3OWJ/4X1GM
    IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 IL Fax: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
    You should have boycotted Google while you could, now Google supported
    BPL is in action. Time is running out on worldwide radio communication.



  14. #29
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.data - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Sat, 12 Nov 2005 07:10:36
    -0800, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I travel a lot to Asia, as do most of my colleagues. We all have
    >separate phones to use over there, because at most companies in this
    >area (Silicon Valley), Verizon is the carrier of choice due to coverage
    >issues with the GSM carriers.


    >[SNIP anti-GSM, pro CDMA propaganda]


    In fact both Cingular/ATTWS and Sprint/Nextel work well in Silicon Valley and
    are strong in the business community.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>



  15. #30
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.data - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Sun, 13 Nov 2005 03:33:32 -0600, "Donald
    Newcomb" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Actually, I hear (read about) this issue with exceutive travelers and their
    >obsession with a "world phone" (single device) that works everywhere. Often
    >the issue is that they can't accept the idea of being trained on using more
    >than one phone. Strange. Do they complain about the toilets and light
    >switches overseas too?


    The usual real issues are being able to be reached easily on a single number
    no matter where they are, and having a single voicemail box. They have much
    better uses of their time than fooling with cell phones.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>



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