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  1. #1
    Wolfgang Barth
    Guest
    John E. wrote:
    > Considering going with T-Mobile here in USA. I like Nokia phones (brand name
    > loyalty based on good experience). Need a speaker phone. Camera, messaging,
    > etc. not important. Working in Europe or Asia a possibility next year.

    Ok.
    >
    > I understand that outside USA, GMS is the most "universal" standard. Is this
    > right?

    GSM is used in a great lot of countries. More than any other standard.
    >
    > WIll any of these phones work in Europe/Asia?
    >
    > 6800 GSM/GPRS 850/1900

    No
    > 6610 GSM/GPRS 900/1800/1900

    Yes
    > 6600 GSM/GPRS/HSCSD 900/1800/1900

    Yes
    > 3660 GSM 900/1800/1900

    Yes
    > 3650 GSM 900/1800/1900

    Yes
    > 3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900

    Yes

    900 and 1800 are used outside North America
    850 (new) and 1900 in North America
    >
    > Of the different standards (GMS/GPRS/HSCSD/EDGE), which are 1) most widely
    > supported 2) "better" (technically?) 3) anything else you'd like to say about
    > them?

    - CSD is the "normal" GSM data standard which all data phones can use
    and virtually all networks are using this at 9600-14000 bit/sec. This is
    billed to the minute.

    - HSCSD is the "highspeed" version of this using more than one channel,
    so it is able to have 2 to 4 times the thruput of CSD. This is billed to
    the minute at the same of CSD for several channels or sometimes per
    channel. Not available with all phones and all networks.

    - GPRS is using packeted data not using full speech channels. Used on
    most networks and most newer phones. You can stay always on with this
    because its billed to the amount of data sent and received. Interesing
    for "data push scenarios". Speed often upload capacity is less than the
    capacity for download. Speed can be higher than HSCSD.

    - EDGE can give even higher data throuput via better modulation.
    Not used very often until now.

    Wolfgang



    See More: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?




  2. #2
    Miguel Cruz
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    John E. <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Considering going with T-Mobile here in USA. I like Nokia phones (brand
    > name loyalty based on good experience). Need a speaker phone. Camera,
    > messaging, etc. not important. Working in Europe or Asia a possibility
    > next year.
    >
    > I understand that outside USA, GMS is the most "universal" standard. Is this
    > right?


    Yes.

    > WIll any of these phones work in Europe/Asia?
    >
    > 6800 GSM/GPRS 850/1900
    > 6610 GSM/GPRS 900/1800/1900
    > 6600 GSM/GPRS/HSCSD 900/1800/1900
    > 3660 GSM 900/1800/1900
    > 3650 GSM 900/1800/1900
    > 3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900


    The first one (6800) will not work at all, and the last one (3220) isn't
    optimal. Better for the US though.

    However, I have a 900/1800/1900 phone and it seemed to work pretty well in
    the US when I visited a month ago. Except Georgetown (western Washington DC)
    - a lot of dead spots there. But decent everywhere aboveground in LA and
    Phoenix.

    > Of the different standards (GMS/GPRS/HSCSD/EDGE), which are 1) most widely
    > supported 2) "better" (technically?) 3) anything else you'd like to say about
    > them?


    If you don't care about messaging or data, then all you need is GSM. The
    other acronyms pertain to data communications.

    miguel
    --
    Hit The Road! Photos from 36 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
    Latest photos: Queens Day in Amsterdam; the Grand Canyon; Amman, Jordan



  3. #3
    Miguel Cruz
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    Miguel Cruz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > John E. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Considering going with T-Mobile here in USA. I like Nokia phones (brand
    >> name loyalty based on good experience). Need a speaker phone. Camera,
    >> messaging, etc. not important. Working in Europe or Asia a possibility
    >> next year.
    >>
    >> I understand that outside USA, GMS is the most "universal" standard. Is
    >> this right?

    >
    > Yes.


    Oh, by the way, Japan is a big exception to this. I couldn't even get a
    GSM signal at Narita airport, let alone elsewhere in the country.

    miguel
    --
    Hit The Road! Photos from 36 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
    Latest photos: Queens Day in Amsterdam; the Grand Canyon; Amman, Jordan



  4. #4
    John Phillips
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 18:32:06 [GMT +0200] (02:32:06 Wednesday, 24 August
    2005 where I live) "Wolfgang Barth" wrote:

    >> 3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900

    > Yes


    Actually may not - some networks "hide" the 1800 band and only hand over
    from the 900 band.

    --
    My mind is made up--don't confuse me with facts.




  5. #5
    Ivor Jones
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?



    "John E." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Considering going with T-Mobile here in USA. I like Nokia
    > phones (brand name loyalty based on good experience).
    > Need a speaker phone. Camera, messaging, etc. not
    > important. Working in Europe or Asia a possibility next
    > year.
    >
    > I understand that outside USA, GMS is the most
    > "universal" standard. Is this right?
    >
    > WIll any of these phones work in Europe/Asia?


    [List snipped]

    Anything that is GSM 900/1800 will work in Europe. I can't speak for Asia,
    never having been there.

    Ivor





  6. #6
    Ivor Jones
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?



    "John Phillips" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 18:32:06 [GMT +0200] (02:32:06
    > Wednesday, 24 August 2005 where I live) "Wolfgang Barth"
    > wrote:
    >
    > > > 3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900

    > > Yes

    >
    > Actually may not - some networks "hide" the 1800 band and
    > only hand over from the 900 band.


    And some don't have 1800 at all.

    Ivor





  7. #7
    DevilsPGD
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    In message <[email protected]> John
    Phillips<[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 18:32:06 [GMT +0200] (02:32:06 Wednesday, 24 August
    >2005 where I live) "Wolfgang Barth" wrote:
    >
    >>> 3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900

    >> Yes

    >
    >Actually may not - some networks "hide" the 1800 band and only hand over
    >from the 900 band.


    It might be just me, but that sounds weird -- Why would they do that?

    --
    What's orange, brown, black, and red? Give up?
    They're COLOURS, idiot!



  8. #8
    matt weber
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 07:29:27 -0700, John E. <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Considering going with T-Mobile here in USA. I like Nokia phones (brand name
    >loyalty based on good experience). Need a speaker phone. Camera, messaging,
    >etc. not important. Working in Europe or Asia a possibility next year.
    >
    >I understand that outside USA, GMS is the most "universal" standard. Is this
    >right?
    >
    >WIll any of these phones work in Europe/Asia?
    >
    >6800 GSM/GPRS 850/1900

    NO. 850/1900 is strictly north America
    >6610 GSM/GPRS 900/1800/1900

    Yes, 900/1800 is standard outside Norht Ameria
    >6600 GSM/GPRS/HSCSD 900/1800/1900

    yes
    >3660 GSM 900/1800/1900

    yes
    >3650 GSM 900/1800/1900

    yes
    >3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900

    probably . The standard for GSM outside the USA is 900 Mhz, however
    most (but NOT all) countries also have 1800 Mhz networks,
    >
    >Of the different standards (GMS/GPRS/HSCSD/EDGE), which are 1) most widely
    >supported 2) "better" (technically?) 3) anything else you'd like to say about
    >them?
    >
    >Thanks,





  9. #9
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    Miguel Cruz wrote:

    > However, I have a 900/1800/1900 phone and it seemed to work pretty well in
    > the US when I visited a month ago. Except Georgetown (western Washington DC)
    > - a lot of dead spots there. But decent everywhere aboveground in LA and
    > Phoenix.


    It depends on whose network you're on. T-Mobile, IIRC, is 1900 throughout
    their US network. Cingular and some other carriers have 800 (850).

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



  10. #10
    Donald Newcomb
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?


    "John E." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > WIll any of these phones work in Europe/Asia?


    You will not find any GSM in two Asian countries: Japan and S. Korea.
    However, Japan has two fully developed WCDMA-2100 networks on which you may
    roam, provided you have a compatible phone. I have a Motorola A835 which I
    use for my trips to Japan. Works like a charm but it's heavy. South Korea is
    building two WCDMA-2100 networks but right now I believe that their coverage
    is limited to the area right around Seoul and they are just now opening
    those nets to roamers. They do rent phones at the airport into which you can
    insert your SIM card and roam on their existing CDMA nets.

    Otherwise any tri-band 900/1800/1900 phone should be perfect for any trips
    to Europe or Asia. There are only a few countries where you can't get by
    without GSM-850 (e.g. Ecuador) and they are all in the Americas.
    --
    Donald Newcomb
    DRNewcomb (at) attglobal (dot) net





  11. #11
    John Phillips
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 17:39:19 [GMT -0600] (09:39:19 Wednesday, 24 August
    2005 where I live) "DevilsPGD" wrote:

    >>Actually may not - some networks "hide" the 1800 band and only hand over
    >>from the 900 band.


    > It might be just me, but that sounds weird -- Why would they do that?


    No idea, but Tel$tra Australia do that.

    --
    Purranoia:The feeling that your cat is up to something.




  12. #12
    John Phillips
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 21:21:28 [GMT -0500] (12:21:28 Wednesday, 24 August
    2005 where I live) "Donald Newcomb" wrote:

    > Otherwise any tri-band 900/1800/1900 phone should be perfect for any trips
    > to Europe or Asia. There are only a few countries where you can't get by
    > without GSM-850 (e.g. Ecuador) and they are all in the Americas.


    http://www.gsmworld.com/roaming/index.shtml is a good starting point for
    further information.

    You can even use GSM (900 band) in North Korea if you want to, but I bet
    this is tightly controlled by the Dear Leader!

    --
    That which does not kill us strengthens us.




  13. #13
    Wolfgang Barth
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    DevilsPGD wrote:
    >>On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 18:32:06 [GMT +0200] (02:32:06 Wednesday, 24 August
    >>2005 where I live) "Wolfgang Barth" wrote:
    >>
    >>>>3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900
    >>>Yes

    Yes, there are 900 only networks and there are 1800 only networks.
    >>
    >>Actually may not - some networks "hide" the 1800 band and only hand over
    >>from the 900 band.

    >
    > It might be just me, but that sounds weird -- Why would they do that?
    >

    Technical Reason.
    Some cells of combined 900/1800 networks are using a channel of the 900
    band for organisational purposes, to check you identity ...

    So you need the 900 band even if speech is taking place in the 1800
    band. A 1800 only phone will not work in such a cell.

    Wolfgang



  14. #14
    DevilsPGD
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?

    In message <[email protected]> Wolfgang Barth
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >DevilsPGD wrote:
    >>>On Tue, 23 Aug 2005, at 18:32:06 [GMT +0200] (02:32:06 Wednesday, 24 August
    >>>2005 where I live) "Wolfgang Barth" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>3220 GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/1800/1900
    >>>>Yes

    >Yes, there are 900 only networks and there are 1800 only networks.
    >>>
    >>>Actually may not - some networks "hide" the 1800 band and only hand over
    >>>from the 900 band.

    >>
    >> It might be just me, but that sounds weird -- Why would they do that?
    >>

    >Technical Reason.
    >Some cells of combined 900/1800 networks are using a channel of the 900
    >band for organisational purposes, to check you identity ...
    >
    >So you need the 900 band even if speech is taking place in the 1800
    >band. A 1800 only phone will not work in such a cell.


    Interesting -- But again, it seems odd to not have an equivalent 1800
    channel doesn't it?

    On the other hand, if the 900MHz signal is carried by all towers equal
    to the 1800MHz signal, and all phones sold by that carrier handle both,
    it's probably a moot point.

    --
    Warning Dates in Calendar are closer than they appear.



  15. #15
    Donald Newcomb
    Guest

    Re: T-Mobile GSM phones for Europe/Asia?


    "DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It might be just me, but that sounds weird -- Why would they do that?


    It has to do with they way the carrier views their 1800 MHz spectrum. Some
    mostly-900-MHz carriers use 1800 MHz just for spot coverage to increase
    capacity in high usage areas. They make no attempt to provide continuous
    1800 MHz coverage. In this situation the only benefit of using 1800 MHz
    control channels would be for the tiny revenue from the few roamers who have
    1800-only phones. Remember that until quite recently, international phones
    that didn't have 900 MHz were nonentities. The only 1800-only phones were a
    few old models from the early days when Orange and One2One (Now T-Mobile UK)
    were brand new. The only thing that even brings this discussion up again is
    Cingular's bizarre idea that it's good enough to send customers roaming
    around the world with a phone without 900 MHz.

    --
    Donald Newcomb
    DRNewcomb (at) attglobal (dot) net





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