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  1. #1
    play
    Guest
    >> THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW YOUR CELL PHONE COULD DO.
    >> There are a few things that can be done in times of
    >> emergencies. Your mobile phone can actually be a life
    >> saver or an emergency tool for survival. Check out the
    >> things that you can do with it:
    >>
    >> FIRST: Emergency
    >> The Emergency Number worldwide for Mobile is 112. If
    >> you find yourself out of the coverage area of your
    >> mobile; network and there is an emergency, dial 112 and
    >> the mobile will search any existing network to establish
    >> the emergency number for you, and interestingly this
    >> number 112 can be dialed even if the keypad is locked. Try it out.


    True

    >> SECOND: Have you locked your keys in the car? Does your car
    >> have remote keyless entry? This may come in handy someday. Good
    >> reason to own a cell phone: If you lock your keys in the car
    >> and the spare keys are at home, call someone at home on their cell
    >> phone from your cell phone. Hold your cell phone about a foot
    >> from your car door and have the person at your home press the
    >> unlock button, holding it near the mobile phone on their end. Your
    >> car will unlock....


    BS.
    Car remote control is usually either radio or infrared....neither of which
    will be picked up by the cell phone on the 'transmiting end'
    and moreso ... transmitted by your phone to the car.


    >> THIRD: Hidden Battery Power
    >> Imagine your cell battery is very low. To activate, press the keys
    >> *3370# Your cell will restart with this reserve and the instrument
    >> will show a 50% increase in battery. This reserve will get charged
    >> when you charge your cell next time.

    BS
    *3370# switches on EFR - i.e. better speach encoding but
    .... this makes you battery power get consumed even faster
    by about 5%
    on the other hand
    #3370# (i.e. hash at the beginning) switches of EFR, therefore
    if you have tis feature enabled by default, yes it can make you
    save battery power but only around 1/10 of what this suggestion
    claims.

    >> FOURTH: How to disable a STOLEN mobile phone?
    >> To check your Mobile phone's serial number, key in
    >> the following digits on your phone: * # 0 6 # . A 15 digit code
    >> will appear on the screen. This number is unique to your handset.
    >> Write it down and keep it somewhere safe. If your phone gets
    >> stolen, you can phone your service provider and give them this
    >> code. They will then be able to block your handset so even if the
    >> thief changes the SIM card, your phone will be totally useless. You
    >> probably won't get your phone back, but at least you know that whoever
    >> stole it can't use/sell it either. If everybody does this, there would
    >> be no point in people stealing mobile phones.
    >> And, Finally....


    This is somewhat also BS nowadays
    when they steal your phone, it will probably will be locked and the simplest
    way of getting rid of all the restrictions, phone numbers stored in memory
    etc. is for them to 'flash' the entire memory of the phone, but that usually
    also means rewriting the IMEI with a new value, making the phone
    virtually 'virgin'

    >> FIFTH: Free 411

    no idea we don't have any 411 services in our country

    p.s.
    if you want some great info related to cell phones I can recommend some of
    the articles
    at our site http://www.telefoniaplay.com/cellphones/

    take care
    --
    T.P.
    --
    http://yankes.blogspot.com - my pictures + info how to sell your photos
    http://unusualandweird.blogspot.com - exactly as the name implies





    See More: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"




  2. #2
    danny burstein
    Guest

    Re: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"

    In <[email protected]> "Richard Colton" <[email protected]> writes:

    >Not exactly. Whilst the GSM spec states that it should happen, in the UK
    >you cannot make emergency calls on any network other than the one for which
    >you have a valid SIM card inserted in your handset.


    What happens if you have a phone that doesn't have a SIM? Are
    you saying that emergency calls are blocked?

    In the US [a], I've confirmed that phones will, indeed,
    call out to the emergency numbers "911" and also "112"
    (not "08" with my phone - perhaps newer ones will work [b])
    as long as there's a compatable cellular signal. This
    works whether or not the phone has a validated SIM in
    it and a working account. I've done cross-network calls
    with no problem.

    [a] I've made these calls, mostly in the NYC area,
    using a formerly Omnipoint, now T-Mobile, Nokia phone
    No problems with or without a SIM, and they go through
    even if the phone is locked.

    [b] the physical phone instrument itself is programmed
    to understand that "911" and "112" should "go out".
    It doesn't recognize "08" so holds it up until it sees
    if the phone can find a cellco network it's got an
    account with. Once that happens, the network translates
    the "08" to "911" and routes it properly.

    I suspect, but have no direct experience, that the
    newer models understand about 08 and will let those
    calls get through.

    - sidenote: I'm the one who suggested to Omnipoint,
    almost a decade ago now... that they map "112" to
    the 911 PSAPs. They were kind enough to write back
    to me that they didn't think it was necessary, but
    lo and behold they soon did so.



    --
    _____________________________________________________
    Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
    [email protected]
    [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]



  3. #3
    Richard Colton
    Guest

    Re: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"


    "danny burstein" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In <[email protected]> "Richard Colton"
    > <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >>Not exactly. Whilst the GSM spec states that it should happen, in the UK
    >>you cannot make emergency calls on any network other than the one for
    >>which
    >>you have a valid SIM card inserted in your handset.

    >
    > What happens if you have a phone that doesn't have a SIM? Are
    > you saying that emergency calls are blocked?


    Yes, that's exactly the position in the UK.

    --
    <<< Unlock Your Phone's Potential >>>
    <<< www.uselessinfo.org.uk >>>
    <<< www.thephonelocker.co.uk >>>
    <<< www.gsm-solutions.co.uk >>>





  4. #4
    danny burstein
    Guest

    emergency calls in the UK, was: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"

    In <[email protected]> "Richard Colton" <[email protected]> writes:
    [ snip ]

    >> What happens if you have a phone that doesn't have a SIM? Are
    >> you saying that emergency calls are blocked?


    >Yes, that's exactly the position in the UK.


    That, if true, sucks. It means that international travelers
    with SIMS that may not be registering for whatever
    reson (rare, but common enough to be an issue), or
    if they've taken the SIM out and not yet put
    in a local one, etc., etc., etc.

    What rationale are the cellcos there using to get
    away with this? I know why they _want_ to, since
    they'd rather make the money...


    --
    _____________________________________________________
    Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
    [email protected]
    [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]



  5. #5
    Richard Colton
    Guest

    Re: emergency calls in the UK, was: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"


    "danny burstein" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In <[email protected]> "Richard Colton"
    > <[email protected]> writes:
    > [ snip ]
    >
    >>> What happens if you have a phone that doesn't have a SIM? Are
    >>> you saying that emergency calls are blocked?

    >
    >>Yes, that's exactly the position in the UK.

    >
    > That, if true, sucks. It means that international travelers
    > with SIMS that may not be registering for whatever
    > reson (rare, but common enough to be an issue), or
    > if they've taken the SIM out and not yet put
    > in a local one, etc., etc., etc.


    Ok, perhaps my original post on this subject could have been clearer.
    International travellers roaming in the UK should have no problems making
    emergency calls due to roaming agreements already in place. However, anyone
    using a UK SIM card which is either deactivated or out of coverage for that
    particular network will not be able to make emergency calls. If a foreign
    SIM cannot register on a UK network correctly, then emergency calls from
    that handset will also be unavailable.

    --
    <<< Unlock Your Phone's Potential >>>
    <<< www.uselessinfo.org.uk >>>
    <<< www.thephonelocker.co.uk >>>
    <<< www.gsm-solutions.co.uk >>>





  6. #6
    Simon Templar
    Guest

    Re: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"

    On Sun, 25 Mar 2007 16:35:54 -0500, "Joe" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> FIRST: Emergency
    >> The Emergency Number worldwide for Mobile is 112. If
    >> you find yourself out of the coverage area of your
    >> mobile; network and there is an emergency, dial 112 and
    >> the mobile will search any existing network to establish
    >> the emergency number for you, and interestingly this
    >> number 112 can be dialed even if the keypad is locked. Try it out.


    Yes 112 is part of the GSM protocol and is normally mapped at the
    Network level to the local EMERGENCY number. As per the GSM protocol
    most phones will dial 112 even if the keypad is locked and without a
    valid SIM card. But as Richard has said in the UK the Network will
    only accept the EMERGENCY call with a valid SIM card.

    Depending on which country the phone is intended for other numbers can
    be configured to function like 112, like 991 in the US and 000 here in
    Australia. My Nokia N70 will dial 112, 911 and 000 with the keypad
    locked and or without a valid SIM card.

    >> SECOND: Have you locked your keys in the car? Does your car
    >> have remote keyless entry? This may come in handy someday. Good
    >> reason to own a cell phone: If you lock your keys in the car
    >> and the spare keys are at home, call someone at home on their cell
    >> phone from your cell phone. Hold your cell phone about a foot
    >> from your car door and have the person at your home press the
    >> unlock button, holding it near the mobile phone on their end. Your
    >> car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to
    >> you. Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away,
    >> and if you can reach someone who has the other "remote" for your
    >> car, you can unlock the doors (or the trunk). Editor's Note: It
    >> works fine! We tried it out and it unlocked our car over a cell phone!"


    TOTAL BULL ****!

    >> THIRD: Hidden Battery Power
    >> Imagine your cell battery is very low. To activate, press the keys
    >> *3370# Your cell will restart with this reserve and the instrument
    >> will show a 50% increase in battery. This reserve will get charged
    >> when you charge your cell next time.


    As others have stated the 3370 code relates to EFR (Enhance Full Rate
    compression) if enabled with increase audio quality (if configured on
    your network) and will also increase battery drain. In NO way does
    access any reserve battery capacity!

    >> FOURTH: How to disable a STOLEN mobile phone?
    >> To check your Mobile phone's serial number, key in
    >> the following digits on your phone: * # 0 6 # . A 15 digit code
    >> will appear on the screen. This number is unique to your handset.
    >> Write it down and keep it somewhere safe. If your phone gets
    >> stolen, you can phone your service provider and give them this
    >> code. They will then be able to block your handset so even if the
    >> thief changes the SIM card, your phone will be totally useless. You
    >> probably won't get your phone back, but at least you know that whoever
    >> stole it can't use/sell it either. If everybody does this, there would
    >> be no point in people stealing mobile phones.
    >> And, Finally....


    As others have stated this is correct IF your provider could be
    bothered to do so, secondly this will only be effective if other
    providers share black listed IMIE numbers to block. Unless forced to
    do so by a Government or other regulating body (which was eventually
    done here in Australia) most providers are loathed to do so as the
    owner has to go out and purchase another phone and the stolen phone
    usually ends up being used by another person with a new SIM card and
    generating more revenue for the provider.

    >> FIFTH: Free 411
    >> Cell phone companies are charging us $1.00 to $1.75 or more for 411
    >> information calls when they don't have to. Most of us do not carry a
    >> telephone directory in our vehicle, which makes this situation
    >> even more of a problem. When you need to use the 411 information option,
    >> simply dial: (800) FREE 411, or (800) 373-3411 without incurring any
    >> charge at all. Program this into your cell phone now.


    Might work in your country but certainly NOT here in Australia.

    But this is basically an abbreviated dial set up by your provider and
    can be any 3 digit number and there can be any number of these set up
    at the Network level, but will only work on that providers network.
    Many Networks set up a 3 digit number for their Customer Support, some
    set other 3 digit numbers for Account Balances, pre-paid recharge etc.
    etc. It is entirely up to the Network if they charge for these
    numbers or allow them for free.


    --
    The views I present are that of my own and NOT of any organisation I
    may belong to.

    73 de Simon, VK3XEM.
    <http://web.acma.gov.au/pls/radcom/client_search.client_lookup?pCLIENT_NO=157452>



  7. #7
    Simon Templar
    Guest

    Re: emergency calls in the UK, was: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"

    On Mon, 26 Mar 2007 17:13:50 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What rationale are the cellcos there using to get
    >away with this? I know why they _want_ to, since
    >they'd rather make the money...


    I would be VERY surprised if they charge for an EMERGENCY call. My
    guess is that this would have been done to prevent HOAX calls being
    placed by persons wanting to remain anonymous.

    This is a problem here in Australia with school children often
    removing their SIM cards to call 112 and say there is a bomb in their
    school to get out of a class.

    What they don't realise is that every time a call is made from a GSM
    phone that the IMIE is transmitted to the Network. If the Networks
    were smart enough in the UK they could easily make use of IMIE number
    when a 112 call is made, provided the IMIE is registered at one of the
    Networks in that country. This could easily be automatically updated
    every time someone makes a normal call using their GSM phone.

    I know here in Australia several people have been prosecuted for even
    sending threatening SMS messages traced back to their phone, even
    though they had a different SIM in the phone to send those messages!


    --
    The views I present are that of my own and NOT of any organisation I
    may belong to.

    73 de Simon, VK3XEM.
    <http://web.acma.gov.au/pls/radcom/client_search.client_lookup?pCLIENT_NO=157452>



  8. #8
    danny burstein
    Guest

    Re: emergency calls in the UK, was: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"

    In <[email protected]> Simon Templar <[email protected]> writes:

    >On Mon, 26 Mar 2007 17:13:50 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein
    ><[email protected]> wrote:


    >>What rationale are the cellcos there using to get
    >>away with this? I know why they _want_ to, since
    >>they'd rather make the money...


    >I would be VERY surprised if they charge for an EMERGENCY call. My
    >guess is that this would have been done to prevent HOAX calls being
    >placed by persons wanting to remain anonymous.


    I guess I wasn't clear enough... The cellcos here in
    the US are mildly pissed at the mandated 911 since
    it means that a modest number of people keep an
    unregistered (and no monthly fees...) phone around
    for 911.

    They much prefer (and heavily market) all sorts of
    low cost (and prepaid) services.

    They've grudgingly accepted the mandate, but I'm sure
    their CFOs curse the FCC over all those "lost" accounts,
    even if they're small amounts.

    --
    _____________________________________________________
    Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
    [email protected]
    [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]



  9. #9
    C Kreskay
    Guest

    Re: is this true? "Cell Phone Tricks"

    Quoth The Raven; Simon Templar <[email protected]> in
    <[email protected]>
    > Yes 112 is part of the GSM protocol and is normally mapped at the
    > Network level to the local EMERGENCY number. As per the GSM protocol
    > most phones will dial 112 even if the keypad is locked and without a
    > valid SIM card. But as Richard has said in the UK the Network will
    > only accept the EMERGENCY call with a valid SIM card.


    this must be so that you cant make anonymous calls to the police, or make
    prank calls

    --
    Reply no longer functions. attention me in this group instead

    After they make styrofoam, what do they ship it in?





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