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  1. #1

    "that would replace the Symbian OS with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 as the
    software for Nokia's smartphones, which accounts for some 30% of their handset
    revenue. "

    "Nokia should have embraced Google, not Microsoft, for one simple reason:
    Android has apps."

    "The U.S. carrier standards mess means Nokia is going to make its best phones
    for other countries."

    http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...&taxonomyId=75
    (links to partnership announcement)

    Guess this answers Malcolm Austin's post.

    --

    http://www.asb.tv/blog/2011/02/oops-aviation/



    See More: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership




  2. #2
    Rex
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership

    R. Mark Clayton wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "that would replace the Symbian OS with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 as the
    >> software for Nokia's smartphones, which accounts for some 30% of their
    >> handset
    >> revenue. "
    >>
    >> "Nokia should have embraced Google, not Microsoft, for one simple reason:
    >> Android has apps."

    >
    > Oh MS and Nokia will never think of that - they wouldn't make all the Ovi /
    > Symbian apps work on the new platform, they wouldn't provide and interface
    > for other apps to work on windows, they would provide and API and
    > development system, they wouldn't make all the MS apps work on it (probably
    > because they have already) and they wouldn't develop new apps for what is
    > still the highest volume phone seller in the world.
    >
    > You bet they will...
    >
    > Whereas crapple have for three decades gone down the proprietry path with
    > customer lock ins etc. MS on the other hand, whilst not as open as Unix and
    > Gnu, has been much more open and farier about providing a platform for third
    > party applications.
    >
    >>
    >> "The U.S. carrier standards mess means Nokia is going to make its best
    >> phones
    >> for other countries."

    >
    > Hardly Nokia's fault just NIH in the USA [again] (it used to be France that
    > did this).
    >
    >


    Sadly, they won't. They've done some handwaving for Qt, but said nothing
    about providing it on WP7. The whole Symbian developer community was
    pinning its hopes on Qt, which would help them transition to Meego as a
    new OS.Microsoft isn't going to allow anyone else to bring up their own
    development tools on any form of Windows. For an example of where this
    is headed- consider that if you want to do any Windows (desktop)
    programming, Microsoft is the only one that makes development tools for
    it. About 15 years ago there were other companies like Borland making
    development tools, now MS is the only one.

    This is like scuttling a ship well in advance of its approaching a reef
    instead of changing course, and then jumping into a leaky boat as a
    substitute.


    -------------------------------------
    "That wasn't made as a reference to the fact that he talked too long."
    --Peter Jennings, following the
    State of the Union Address.
    -------------------------------------



  3. #3
    Brave Burger
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership

    [email protected] wrote:
    > "that would replace the Symbian OS with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 as the
    > software for Nokia's smartphones, which accounts for some 30% of their
    > handset
    > revenue. "
    >
    > "Nokia should have embraced Google, not Microsoft, for one simple reason:
    > Android has apps."
    >
    > "The U.S. carrier standards mess means Nokia is going to make its best
    > phones
    > for other countries."


    Yep, Nokia makes a bad decision again.





  4. #4
    Greg N.
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership

    On 14.02.2011 18:53, Brave Burger wrote:

    > Yep, Nokia makes a bad decision again.


    Nokia's biggest blunder started a decade ago and went on ever since.
    When they got involved in the smartphone biz, they did not understand
    (and, consequently, ignored) the app upward compatibility requirement.
    Every new phone generation required app developers to come up with a new
    version. Customers and app developers alike were bitten by this three,
    four times.

    MS would be nowhere today if they had not provided app compatibility in
    countless DOS and Windows releases in 30 years. Same goes for the Mac.
    It is not smart to believe a better operating system is worth anything
    without app compatibility. IBM's OS/2 is a perfect example for that
    misconception.

    Today, Symbian app developers are jumping ship in increasing numbers.
    The app world for Symbian^3 is a desert. And consequently, there is not
    much that keeps Symbian customers in the boat, either.

    Maybe WP is the way to go. MS understands the app continuity issue.

    --
    Gregor



  5. #5
    Rex
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership

    Greg N. wrote:
    > On 14.02.2011 18:53, Brave Burger wrote:
    >
    >> Yep, Nokia makes a bad decision again.

    >
    > Nokia's biggest blunder started a decade ago and went on ever since.
    > When they got involved in the smartphone biz, they did not understand
    > (and, consequently, ignored) the app upward compatibility requirement.
    > Every new phone generation required app developers to come up with a new
    > version. Customers and app developers alike were bitten by this three,
    > four times.



    Not true. Nokia only had S60 3rd edition since 2006 (which broke
    compatibility for 2nd edition before it, but app makers caught up) and
    you can install any non touch app from the last 4 years on it.
    5th edition obviously was different, because of the touchscreen. Yet
    there are some apps that will still work fine on 5th edition (Mobipocket
    Reader for one, I've used that for ages). Symbian^3 is a continuation of
    5th edition and again you can still install 5th edn apps on Symbian 3.


    > MS would be nowhere today if they had not provided app compatibility in
    > countless DOS and Windows releases in 30 years. Same goes for the Mac.
    > It is not smart to believe a better operating system is worth anything
    > without app compatibility. IBM's OS/2 is a perfect example for that
    > misconception.


    The Mac has never supported backwards compatibility. Each new iteration
    of Mac OS has broken with the previous one. For example, Mac OS 9 apps
    won't run on Mac OS X. That never affected its popularity.

    >
    > Today, Symbian app developers are jumping ship in increasing numbers.
    > The app world for Symbian^3 is a desert. And consequently, there is not
    > much that keeps Symbian customers in the boat, either.
    >
    > Maybe WP is the way to go. MS understands the app continuity issue.
    >


    Ovi Store was the highest grossing appstore, second only to apple, but
    way ahead of the android store. It had 4 million downloads A DAY and
    increasing. No one was 'jumping ship', until the wonderful announcement
    on Friday. Earlier, Symbian developers had Qt as the path to developing
    apps that would work in future with Meego, now that the entire
    Symbian-Qt-Meego initiative is dead they'll leave in large numbers.

    Oh, and WP7 has only shipped 2 million units till date (shipped, not
    sold to customers).
    To succeed, customers will have to accept Wp over the iOS/Android
    juggernaut. Only time will tell, for now the future of Nokia is very bleak.



    -------------------------------------
    How to communicate through your terminal. When you type characters, a gnome
    deep in the system gathers your characters and saves them in a secret place.
    The characters will not be given to a program until you type a return (or
    newline), as described above in Logging in.
    -------------------------------------



  6. #6
    Greg N.
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership

    On 14.02.2011 21:41, Rex wrote:

    > Not true. Nokia only had S60 3rd edition since 2006 (which broke
    > compatibility for 2nd edition before it,


    On top of that, under S60 3rd, there were numerous incompatibilities
    between FP1 and FP2.

    > 5th edition obviously was different, because of the touchscreen.


    S605th did not necessarily have to be incompatible. They could have
    provided a compatibility mode through a touch-operated virtual phone
    keyboard - this was suggested more than once. They opted not to.

    > Yet there are some apps that will still work fine on 5th edition (Mobipocket
    > Reader for one, I've used that for ages).


    No. Mobipocket is one of the main reasons for my anger. Amazon (who owns
    Mobipocket) has obviously decided to abandon Mobipocket development.
    There is no reliable version for S60v5 and S^3. A solution is
    unlikely. If current Symbian releases were app compatible with S60v3,
    the problem would not exist.

    > Symbian^3 is a continuation of 5th edition and again you can still install 5th edn apps on Symbian 3.


    Maybe, but that's not the issue. I'm complaining about S60v3 apps that
    won't run on S60v5 and S^3.

    > The Mac has never supported backwards compatibility.


    OK, my fault. I made an incorrect statement. I stand corrected.

    > Ovi Store was the highest grossing appstore, second only to apple, but
    > way ahead of the android store. It had 4 million downloads A DAY and
    > increasing. No one was 'jumping ship'...


    Can you supply hard facts about the proportion of, say, S60v3 apps
    versus S^3 apps?

    My impression is, developes have been jumping ship indeed, quite a while
    ago. Of the s60v3 apps that I used to use, four were vital to me,
    sortof. Three of them have no successor version for S60v5 and S^3. The
    development companies don't respond to my emails, their websites have
    remained unchanged for the last 18 months.

    --
    Gregor



  7. #7
    Chris Blunt
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership

    On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 20:53:28 +0100, "Greg N." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 14.02.2011 18:53, Brave Burger wrote:
    >
    >> Yep, Nokia makes a bad decision again.

    >
    >Nokia's biggest blunder started a decade ago and went on ever since.
    >When they got involved in the smartphone biz, they did not understand
    >(and, consequently, ignored) the app upward compatibility requirement.
    >Every new phone generation required app developers to come up with a new
    >version. Customers and app developers alike were bitten by this three,
    >four times.


    I think one of Nokia's mistakes is having too large a product range.
    They have literally dozens of models, many of which are very similar
    in functionality. As a result, their development resources are spread
    far too thinly.

    They need to have maybe five or six models available. They would start
    with a basic simple phone and go to the top of the range smartphone
    which they could focus on making a market leading product.

    Nokia have at least 20 years experience of making mobile phones, and
    even the first models they produced way back then were market leaders.
    They should never have allowed themselves to be overtaken by companies
    like Apple, who only came into the phone market a few years ago.

    Chris



  8. #8
    Brian Watson
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership


    "R. Mark Clayton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "that would replace the Symbian OS with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 as
    >> the
    >> software for Nokia's smartphones, which accounts for some 30% of their
    >> handset
    >> revenue. "
    >>
    >> "Nokia should have embraced Google, not Microsoft, for one simple reason:
    >> Android has apps."

    >
    > Oh MS and Nokia will never think of that - they wouldn't make all the Ovi
    > / Symbian apps work on the new platform,


    They couldn't make Ovi work on the old one!

    Lol.

    Working with Microsoft now? Hmm, I will wait until Service Pack 2 before
    adopting it.

    --
    Brian
    "Fight like the Devil, die like a gentleman."
    www.imagebus.co.uk/shop





  9. #9
    Malcolm Austin
    Guest

    Re: Nokia and Microsoft this week announced a new partnership

    Nice answer to my original post, although happily going further on than that
    (which is what I hoped
    would happen)

    Discussion is good, just so far Nokia seems to have singularly failed to do
    so, and lost contact with
    their customers. Putting out phones that work poorly from the box is
    another huge turn off that they
    did and continue to do.

    It looks like they are still designing steam driven road rollers whilst the
    rest of us have moved to
    jet power now ;-)

    Malcolm...


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "that would replace the Symbian OS with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 as the
    > software for Nokia's smartphones, which accounts for some 30% of their
    > handset
    > revenue. "
    >
    > "Nokia should have embraced Google, not Microsoft, for one simple reason:
    > Android has apps."
    >
    > "The U.S. carrier standards mess means Nokia is going to make its best
    > phones
    > for other countries."
    >
    > http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...&taxonomyId=75
    > (links to partnership announcement)
    >
    > Guess this answers Malcolm Austin's post.
    >
    > --
    >
    > http://www.asb.tv/blog/2011/02/oops-aviation/
    >