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  1. #1
    Ƨ
    Guest
    Lifted from http://press.nokia.com/PR/200310/920998_5.html

    Recently, in the Netherlands a battery used in a Nokia 7210 mobile
    phone exploded. An investigation by Nokia experts clearly proved that
    the battery involved in the incident was not a Nokia battery. Over the
    past months, cases have been reported of non-original mobile phone
    batteries exploding, causing damage to both batteries and phones. In
    all the reported cases, the battery has been a non-original battery.
    Nokia offers its cooperation to authorities in taking legal measures
    available against those who sell and distribute poor quality
    non-original mobile phone enhancements compatible to Nokia products.

    In general, the reported incidents are due to an internal short
    circuit. An internal short circuit can be caused by careless design,
    an uncontrolled production process or a combination of both. Original
    Nokia batteries and chargers are designed and manufactured adhering to
    stringent safety and quality measures. These include very strict
    requirements regarding the materials and insulation used inside the
    batteries as well as continuous production control and intensive
    product testing.

    "Nokia invests a lot in research and development to constantly
    safeguard and improve the quality and safety in Nokia products," said
    Juha Murtopuro, Director, Mobile Enhancements Business Unit, Nokia
    Mobile Phones. "With the non-original batteries we have been able to
    inspect, it appears that they did not fulfill the safety and quality
    requirements comparable to those that Nokia applies to its original
    batteries. Using inferior quality standards may lead to these types of
    incidents occuring. The best way to prevent such incidents is to use
    only original Nokia enhancements and to buy them from an authorized or
    other reputable dealer."

    In response to the recent incidents, Nokia has intensified its
    enforcement efforts. These include alerting its own distribution
    channels to the dangers of counterfeit products (a non-original
    product that infringes Nokia's trademark), requesting their assistance
    in identifying the source of such products and prosecuting parties
    found to be distributing counterfeit products.

    Furthermore, Nokia is increasing its cooperation with local customs
    and law enforcement agencies. The cooperation will also include
    training to distinguish between original and counterfeit products.
    Nokia has set up an email address where concerned parties can provide
    Nokia with information on counterfeit products:
    [email protected].



    See More: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries




  2. #2
    Stuart
    Guest

    Re: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries


    "Ƨ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Lifted from http://press.nokia.com/PR/200310/920998_5.html
    >


    Interestingly Nokia are giving no information as to whether the errant
    batteries were counterfeit or third-party or whether they came from the same
    source. This they must know.

    Which helps to spread a fair amount of FUD to Nokia's advantage.
    Understandable for Nokia but unacceptable as regards consumer protection
    (which would want competition in the battery market - but not dangerous
    goods).

    Do we have a source of unbiased information on this problem?

    --
    Stuart





  3. #3
    Dolphin Boy
    Guest

    Re: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries

    I hear Mossad are sueing Nokia for patent infringment on exploding
    phones ;-)





  4. #4
    Reestit Mutton
    Guest

    Re: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries

    Ƨ wrote:
    > Lifted from http://press.nokia.com/PR/200310/920998_5.html
    >
    > Recently, in the Netherlands a battery used in a Nokia 7210 mobile
    > phone exploded. An investigation by Nokia experts clearly proved that
    > the battery involved in the incident was not a Nokia battery. Over the
    > past months, cases have been reported of non-original mobile phone
    > batteries exploding, causing damage to both batteries and phones. In
    > all the reported cases, the battery has been a non-original battery.
    > Nokia offers its cooperation to authorities in taking legal measures
    > available against those who sell and distribute poor quality
    > non-original mobile phone enhancements compatible to Nokia products.
    >


    and they mention nothing about a recent case where the exploding phone
    had an ORIGINAL battery in it?

    hmmmm...suspect!

    RM




  5. #5
    Stuart
    Guest

    Re: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries


    "Reestit Mutton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > and they mention nothing about a recent case where the exploding phone
    > had an ORIGINAL battery in it?


    It was later said it was *not* a Nokia battery. Whether it was a counterfeit
    (ie was labelled Nokia) or not is not clear to me.

    This issue lacks the clarity one would expect.

    --
    Stuart





  6. #6
    a_dude
    Guest

    Re: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries

    um, instead of blaming batteries, has anyone thought if those exploding
    phones were flashed?

    maybe the flash reprogramming did it..

    just a thought...since there are quite a few mods and re flash files out
    there, and with a HEX editor, well u know what that can do



    "Dolphin Boy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I hear Mossad are sueing Nokia for patent infringment on exploding
    > phones ;-)
    >
    >






  7. #7

    Re: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 09:58:54 +1000, "a_dude" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >um, instead of blaming batteries, has anyone thought if those exploding
    >phones were flashed?


    I'm fascinated: what software modification to a phone do you think
    would add an ability to make the battery explode?


    --

    Iain
    the out-of-date hairydog guide to mobile phones
    http://www.hairydog.co.uk/cell1.html
    Browse now while stocks last!



  8. #8
    a_dude
    Guest

    Re: Nokia press release today regarding exploding batteries

    Well I'm not too sure about the ARM programming code used in Nokia DCT3
    phones, but unless the routines for regulating battery control (battery
    services) are stored on a non-writeable chip (which I doubt it as EEprom is
    now emulated in some phones), then I can guess that modifying the routines
    or competely removing them might cause some serious problems.

    I have modified numerous 33xx phones with completely different and sometimes
    wacky mods, and one particular mod I remember seeing the battery temperature
    (using Net Monitor) rise to 40+ degrees, just by sitting on a table in the
    middle of winter!

    Pity i destroyed the Hex mod i made, since I entered some hex digits where I
    thought my High scores might be ....
    but since that day, I'm careful modifying hex numbers


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 09:58:54 +1000, "a_dude" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >um, instead of blaming batteries, has anyone thought if those exploding
    > >phones were flashed?

    >
    > I'm fascinated: what software modification to a phone do you think
    > would add an ability to make the battery explode?
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Iain
    > the out-of-date hairydog guide to mobile phones
    > http://www.hairydog.co.uk/cell1.html
    > Browse now while stocks last!






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