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  1. #1
    Wildfire
    Guest
    More specifically the battery, my 6210 won't be getting used for a
    couple of month and I'm just wondering what would be less damaging to
    the Li-ion battery?

    Should I drain, recharge as normal (could be a PITA to remember
    though), fully charge and keep powered down, or drain it completely and
    forget about it?

    Any suggestions welcome.

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    Wildfire
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    See More: Best way to treat an unused phone.




  2. #2
    Mike S.
    Guest

    Re: Best way to treat an unused phone.


    In article <[email protected]>,
    Wildfire <[email protected]> wrote:
    >More specifically the battery, my 6210 won't be getting used for a
    >couple of month and I'm just wondering what would be less damaging to
    >the Li-ion battery?
    >
    >Should I drain, recharge as normal (could be a PITA to remember
    >though), fully charge and keep powered down, or drain it completely and
    >forget about it?


    A battery engineer who posts a lot in the sci.chem.electrochem.battery
    newsgroup has stated that LiIon batteries are "most stable" for long term
    storage when they are about 50% charged. This is why manufacturers ship
    LiIon cells at approximately this level. There are various reasons why
    capacity is lost more quickly if they are stored fully charged of fully
    discharged.




  3. #3
    Wildfire
    Guest

    Re: Best way to treat an unused phone.

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 18:39:34 GMT: Mike S. scribbled in
    alt.cellular.nokia

    > LiIon batteries are "most stable" for long term storage when they are
    > about 50% charged


    Cheers Mike

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    Wildfire
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  4. #4
    Adam Greatrix
    Guest

    Re: Best way to treat an unused phone.

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > A battery engineer who posts a lot in the sci.chem.electrochem.battery
    > newsgroup has stated that LiIon batteries are "most stable" for long term
    > storage when they are about 50% charged. This is why manufacturers ship
    > LiIon cells at approximately this level.


    True to an extent, but it's acutally the residual charge left after they
    test them. The batteries are not deliberately charged to around 50% for
    transport, in fact the charge left over is a lot less than this, although it
    may well show up as 50% full on the phone this is inaccurate data.

    > There are various reasons why
    > capacity is lost more quickly if they are stored fully charged of fully
    > discharged.


    LiIon and LiPol batteries are mildly damaged every time they are
    *completely* discharged. When translated to Nokia phone usage, it's best to
    charge a LiIon/Pol battery as soon as possible when the battery low warning
    is given, and before the phone actually turns off. The exception to this
    rule is the first 3 to 5 times of charging - they should be completely
    charged (and then left on charge for a few more hours) then completely
    discharged until the phone switches off, then repeated 2 to 4 more times.

    If you plan to leave your phone for a long time without charging it would be
    an idea to remove the battery from it to prevent the phone slowly
    discharging the battery. You will lose the settings in your phone eventually
    so make a backup if it's important - or plug the charger into it after the
    battery is removed and that may power the phone as well - but to you want to
    leave something plugged in for months at a time?

    I've never heard of any problems storing LiIon/Pol batteries fully charged
    in all my experience (which is quite a lot when it comes to batteries). But
    that doesn't mean to say you're wrong - I've in fact never looked into it.
    Any idea of the reasoning behind not storing them fully charged? I'm
    interested...

    Adam





  5. #5
    Wildfire
    Guest

    Re: Best way to treat an unused phone.

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 20:37:10 GMT: Adam Greatrix scribbled in
    alt.cellular.nokia

    > If you plan to leave your phone for a long time without charging
    > it would be an idea to remove the battery from it to prevent the
    > phone slowly discharging the battery.


    Points taken, either way it seems reasonable to leave it charged to
    around 50% and then remove the battery.

    > You will lose the settings in your phone eventually so make a
    > backup if it's important


    Already done, thanks anyway

    > but to you want to leave something plugged in for months at a time?


    The backup seems the more reasonable course of action :-)



    --
    Wildfire
    Proud to be an Arab
    Remove only "ThE" & "ObViOuS." to reply



  6. #6
    Mike S.
    Guest

    Re: Best way to treat an unused phone.


    In article <[email protected]s1.newsguy.com>,
    Adam Greatrix <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >I've never heard of any problems storing LiIon/Pol batteries fully charged
    >in all my experience (which is quite a lot when it comes to batteries). But
    >that doesn't mean to say you're wrong - I've in fact never looked into it.
    >Any idea of the reasoning behind not storing them fully charged? I'm
    >interested...


    The engineer who posts on the battery newsgroup on this rather often is
    named Evgenij Barsukov. He works for some battery manufacturer in Korea
    if I remember correctly.

    He said something like "accelerated decomposition of electrolyte" is the
    reason for capacity loss when stored at 100% charge.

    With extended storage at 100% discharge, the cell loses capacity because
    of dissolution of the protective layer on the anode, which is regenerated
    when the cell is charged - consuming materials that then reduce the reactive
    elements used to produce electricity.




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