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  1. #1
    David G. Imber
    Guest
    I thought I had it there for a second, then it just vanished like a
    soap bubble.






    See More: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?




  2. #2
    John Eckart
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    If you have to ask, it's not for you. But it's very handy and useful for =
    allot of people.

    "David G. Imber" <[email protected]> wrote in message =
    news:[email protected]
    > I thought I had it there for a second, then it just vanished like a
    > soap bubble.
    >=20
    >=20
    >




  3. #3
    David G. Imber
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 07:27:42 GMT, "John Eckart" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If you have to ask, it's not for you. But it's very handy and useful for allot of people.
    >


    I hear you. But I'd like to ask, is it faster than ringing someone
    on speed dial? Is the voice quality better? I'm trying to get at the
    specific benefits. Despite my tone, I wasn't being entirely facetious.

    Thanks! DGI






  4. #4
    DSL GURU
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    Of course theirs an advantage in RL over PCS to PCS.

    With RL you get to buy new phones and pay extra every month.

    For the same 2 year agreement, PCS to PCS is free.

    =================
    Oh, nevermind, you could be correct.



  5. #5
    DSL GURU
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    > But it's very handy and useful for
    > allot of people.


    True Walkie-Talkie like Nextel has is, whether RL measures up hasn't been
    determined yet, it just went on sale, likely not to a lot of people yet.



  6. #6
    Bob Smith
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?


    "Isaiah Beard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    Thanks for the follow up Isaiah. So ... when RL with your friend, what do
    you do, go to your address book, select his name, and just hit the PTT
    button to initiate the call?

    Also, which phone model are you using? How 'bout a mini-review of the phone?

    Thanks, Bob





  7. #7
    Kevin
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    I used to use Nextel. I would like RL for the group calling (up to 6
    people) and alert features. I would like the phone for the
    speakerphone feature. I presently use Motorola Timeport with the
    optional speakerphone when I have conference calls to make. The
    "push-to-talk" to one person is sometimes handy but in general it is
    annoying. People assume you need to answer the call. Sometimes, I
    would turn off my phone so it would force people to leave a voicemail
    message by dialing my number.

    -Kevin

    David G. Imber <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 07:27:42 GMT, "John Eckart" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >If you have to ask, it's not for you. But it's very handy and useful for allot of people.
    > >

    >
    > I hear you. But I'd like to ask, is it faster than ringing someone
    > on speed dial? Is the voice quality better? I'm trying to get at the
    > specific benefits. Despite my tone, I wasn't being entirely facetious.
    >
    > Thanks! DGI




  8. #8
    David G. Imber
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 11:11:22 -0500, Isaiah Beard
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >David G. Imber wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 07:27:42 GMT, "John Eckart" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>If you have to ask, it's not for you. But it's very handy and useful for allot of people.

    >
    >
    >> I hear you. But I'd like to ask, is it faster than ringing someone
    >> on speed dial? Is the voice quality better?


    [snip]

    >I think a lot of it has to with the fact that PTT is better suited for
    >quick question and answer things. Last night I used ReadyLink for this
    >purpose, and the conversation went faster than it would have if I had
    >made a phone call.
    >
    >The Ready Link conversation went like this:


    [snip]
    >
    >
    >Me: "Okay, looks like I'm missing a software patch. Thanks!"
    >
    >
    >A phone conversation would have been something like:
    >
    >Me: *waits for phone to ring*
    >
    >Mike: "Hello?"
    >
    >Me: "Hey Mike, It's Isaiah. How're you?"


    [snip]

    >I guess it boils down to this: there's a certain formality that we've
    >come to expect from a phone call that isn't necessarily present in a PTT
    >conversation. Now, you may be one who enjoys this formality, and you
    >might even argue that PTT will make people a little more rude on the
    >whole. Frankly, I don't see it this way; in fact, I think it's more
    >rude to waste someone's time with a lot of needless chatter, especially
    >if they're busy and were interrupted by my calling them.


    No, I kind of get it, so please don't think I'm being combative for
    its own sake. It's just that I bristle at the idea of paying a phone
    company to perform my own behavior modification upon myself.

    I mean if the guy's busy, he may turn off his ringer or manually
    send the call to vm. But if he's busy, he's busy, and you're bugging him
    whether you do it by ptt or ring-ring. In fact by using a "walkie-talkie"
    mode you may be suggesting that your business is "extra important" - too
    important to go through "normal channels".

    >
    >Even so, it would be even more rude if I called someone on the phone,
    >and the moment they said hello I demanded a piece of info from them and
    >then immediately hung up after getting the answer.


    I have no problem with "Hi, listen, I don't want to keep you but I
    need to know what version of xyz you're using, I'm having a problem. 5.4?
    Thanks, I'll catch you later OK?"

    Fast and free (well, included).

    >And then again, maybe the fact that I have a degree in communication
    >science means I'm over analyzing this.


    We're clearly in that rowboat together.

    As I say, I get it. So if it works for people and it seems a good
    value to them, I'm all for it. The 5-way communication is a definite
    benefit if you can use it.

    DGI






  9. #9
    Bob Smith
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?


    "Isaiah Beard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    <snipped>
    > The only real drawback is that the battery life leaves a little to be a
    > desired. It's not horrendous, but whereas I could go for three or so
    > days without a recharge on my 8100, the RL2500 will maybe go two days...
    > 24 hours if you use ReadyLink a lot. Then again, the phone ships with
    > the slim battery, so it should perform better with an extended battery.


    Well, how long have you had the phone ... IOW, how long have you been
    playing with it? . That need to recharge might just be initial over use,
    playing with the new phone ...

    Bob





  10. #10
    plane
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > David G. Imber wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 07:27:42 GMT, "John Eckart" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>If you have to ask, it's not for you. But it's very handy and useful for allot of people.

    >
    >
    > > I hear you. But I'd like to ask, is it faster than ringing someone
    > > on speed dial? Is the voice quality better?

    >
    > Voice quality, at least on Readylink is about the same.
    >
    > Is it faster than speed dial? I would argue yes, but that's probably
    > subject to individual opinions.
    >
    > I think a lot of it has to with the fact that PTT is better suited for
    > quick question and answer things. Last night I used ReadyLink for this
    > purpose, and the conversation went faster than it would have if I had
    > made a phone call.
    >
    > The Ready Link conversation went like this:
    >
    > Me: *Hits PTT* "Mike, are you there?"
    >
    > Mike: "Yeah, what's up?"
    >
    > Me: "Just curious... what version of XYZ software package do you have
    > running?"
    >
    > Mike: "1.2.3"
    >
    > Me: "Okay, looks like I'm missing a software patch. Thanks!"
    >
    >
    > A phone conversation would have been something like:
    >
    > Me: *waits for phone to ring*
    >
    > Mike: "Hello?"
    >
    > Me: "Hey Mike, It's Isaiah. How're you?" (Even though I've spoken with
    > him at work just an hour ago and know exactly how he's doing.)
    >
    > Mike: "Oh, pretty good..."
    >
    > [Insert a couple minutes of small talk here...]
    >
    > Me: "Oh by the way, XYZ software package has been crashing a lot on my
    > computer, but I noticed you said you had no trouble with it. What
    > software version do you have...?"
    >
    > [After I get my answer, I thank them and we probably end up in a few
    > more minutes of chatter before one of us decides to bow out of the call.]
    >
    >
    > I guess it boils down to this: there's a certain formality that we've
    > come to expect from a phone call that isn't necessarily present in a PTT
    > conversation. Now, you may be one who enjoys this formality, and you
    > might even argue that PTT will make people a little more rude on the
    > whole. Frankly, I don't see it this way; in fact, I think it's more
    > rude to waste someone's time with a lot of needless chatter, especially
    > if they're busy and were interrupted by my calling them.
    >
    > Even so, it would be even more rude if I called someone on the phone,
    > and the moment they said hello I demanded a piece of info from them and
    > then immediately hung up after getting the answer. PTT eliminates that:
    > the other person knows immediately who I am based on the sound of my
    > voice and what is displayed on their phone's screen, and because it's
    > PTT, we mutually understand and expect the conversation to be quick and
    > to the point.
    >
    >
    > And then again, maybe the fact that I have a degree in communication
    > science means I'm over analyzing this.
    >
    > Oh, there's one other advantage: with ReadyLink you can have five people
    > in a conversation. With PCS to PCS, you're looking at three people,
    > tops. If you have a group of people using this, this might be of
    > advantage to you.



    Great post, not biased, thanks.



  11. #11
    SAA
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    I have had my phone since Saturday. I did the inital charge, then had
    to recharge it on Monday, it is now Wednesday and it is about due for
    a recharge. I have not used readylink yet because no one I know has
    bought another one of these phones yet.

    The battery is the only drawback to the phone. I will definitely be
    getting the extended battery.



    On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 20:55:06 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Isaiah Beard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    ><snipped>
    >> The only real drawback is that the battery life leaves a little to be a
    >> desired. It's not horrendous, but whereas I could go for three or so
    >> days without a recharge on my 8100, the RL2500 will maybe go two days...
    >> 24 hours if you use ReadyLink a lot. Then again, the phone ships with
    >> the slim battery, so it should perform better with an extended battery.

    >
    >Well, how long have you had the phone ... IOW, how long have you been
    >playing with it? . That need to recharge might just be initial over use,
    >playing with the new phone ...
    >
    >Bob
    >





  12. #12
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    SAA <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have had my phone since Saturday. I did the inital charge, then had
    > to recharge it on Monday, it is now Wednesday and it is about due for
    > a recharge. I have not used readylink yet because no one I know has
    > bought another one of these phones yet.


    I understand that Verizon's V.60p, their first and (to date) only, PTT
    phone, has crappy battery life too.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



  13. #13
    Donkey Agony
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    Isaiah Beard wrote:

    > The only real drawback is that the battery life leaves a little to be
    > a desired.


    If you used an RL2500 without Readylink (just normal phone usage), I
    wonder how much better the battery life would be.

    I've been thinking about replacing my 4900, but I *love* its battery
    life. I can see how PTT could have its uses for some people in certain
    situations, but I personally don't need it.

    --
    da
    ~~
    "OE Quotefix" http://flash.to/oe-quotefix
    to fix Outlook Express' broken quoting.





  14. #14
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included pcs to pcs minutes?

    Isaiah Beard <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Nextel's phones aren't so great in the battery life department either.
    > There must be something inherent in PTT that requires more activity from
    > a phone than standard wireless service would.


    Verizon's V.60 checks the network every few minutes to update the "buddy list"
    (your list of contacts who are available to talk to). I'm sure Nextel and
    Sprint do the same thing.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



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