Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest
    David G. Imber wrote:

    > On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 07:27:42 GMT, "John Eckart" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>If you have to ask, it's not for you. But it's very handy and useful for allot of people.



    > I hear you. But I'd like to ask, is it faster than ringing someone
    > on speed dial? Is the voice quality better?


    Voice quality, at least on Readylink is about the same.

    Is it faster than speed dial? I would argue yes, but that's probably
    subject to individual opinions.

    I think a lot of it has to with the fact that PTT is better suited for
    quick question and answer things. Last night I used ReadyLink for this
    purpose, and the conversation went faster than it would have if I had
    made a phone call.

    The Ready Link conversation went like this:

    Me: *Hits PTT* "Mike, are you there?"

    Mike: "Yeah, what's up?"

    Me: "Just curious... what version of XYZ software package do you have
    running?"

    Mike: "1.2.3"

    Me: "Okay, looks like I'm missing a software patch. Thanks!"


    A phone conversation would have been something like:

    Me: *waits for phone to ring*

    Mike: "Hello?"

    Me: "Hey Mike, It's Isaiah. How're you?" (Even though I've spoken with
    him at work just an hour ago and know exactly how he's doing.)

    Mike: "Oh, pretty good..."

    [Insert a couple minutes of small talk here...]

    Me: "Oh by the way, XYZ software package has been crashing a lot on my
    computer, but I noticed you said you had no trouble with it. What
    software version do you have...?"

    [After I get my answer, I thank them and we probably end up in a few
    more minutes of chatter before one of us decides to bow out of the call.]


    I guess it boils down to this: there's a certain formality that we've
    come to expect from a phone call that isn't necessarily present in a PTT
    conversation. Now, you may be one who enjoys this formality, and you
    might even argue that PTT will make people a little more rude on the
    whole. Frankly, I don't see it this way; in fact, I think it's more
    rude to waste someone's time with a lot of needless chatter, especially
    if they're busy and were interrupted by my calling them.

    Even so, it would be even more rude if I called someone on the phone,
    and the moment they said hello I demanded a piece of info from them and
    then immediately hung up after getting the answer. PTT eliminates that:
    the other person knows immediately who I am based on the sound of my
    voice and what is displayed on their phone's screen, and because it's
    PTT, we mutually understand and expect the conversation to be quick and
    to the point.


    And then again, maybe the fact that I have a degree in communication
    science means I'm over analyzing this.

    Oh, there's one other advantage: with ReadyLink you can have five people
    in a conversation. With PCS to PCS, you're looking at three people,
    tops. If you have a group of people using this, this might be of
    advantage to you.




    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.




    See More: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included




  2. #2
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included

    Bob Smith wrote:

    > "Isaiah Beard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > Thanks for the follow up Isaiah. So ... when RL with your friend, what do
    > you do, go to your address book, select his name, and just hit the PTT
    > button to initiate the call?


    Pretty much. When I hit the Rlink button, my personal list shows up and
    I can highlight who I want. It PTT and the call is set up.

    >
    > Also, which phone model are you using? How 'bout a mini-review of the phone?


    I'm using the RL2500. And, I can say that aside from it not being a
    camera phone, this IS the best phone Sanyo has produced yet. It's a bit
    longer than the 8100, but thinner. The interface is a lot nicer, a
    little more icon driven than previous models. And the speakerphone
    function is *excellent*. Signal reception is about on-par, maybe
    slightly better than the 8100. Even without ReadyLink, this is a good
    phone.

    The only real drawback is that the battery life leaves a little to be a
    desired. It's not horrendous, but whereas I could go for three or so
    days without a recharge on my 8100, the RL2500 will maybe go two days...
    24 hours if you use ReadyLink a lot. Then again, the phone ships with
    the slim battery, so it should perform better with an extended battery.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.




  3. #3
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included

    Steven J Sobol wrote:

    > SAA <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I have had my phone since Saturday. I did the inital charge, then had
    >>to recharge it on Monday, it is now Wednesday and it is about due for
    >>a recharge. I have not used readylink yet because no one I know has
    >>bought another one of these phones yet.

    >
    >
    > I understand that Verizon's V.60p, their first and (to date) only, PTT
    > phone, has crappy battery life too.
    >


    I think PTT in general is the cause for the shortened battery life.
    Nextel's phones aren't so great in the battery life department either.
    There must be something inherent in PTT that requires more activity from
    a phone than standard wireless service would.

    Maybe I'll try disabling ReadyLink and see if that improves battery life.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.




  4. #4
    DSL GURU
    Guest

    Re: Once again, what's the advantage of paying for PTT over included

    I think PTT in general is the cause for the shortened battery life.
    =================================

    Yes, in Verizon's case the phone "calls in" to the network every 5 minutes so
    announce its presence.

    You should receive a boost in battery performance by turning off the Ready
    Link. Analagous to turning off Appletalk protocol on a Macintosh laptop
    computer to enhance battery life.



  • Similar Threads