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  1. #1
    Richard Ness
    Guest
    It's not the frequency, it's the digital transmission method.

    CDMA doesn't cause much, if any interference. TDMA and Nextel
    definitely do because TDMA (the time slots) pulse (iDEN is similar).

    Ever heard that "tick, tick, tick.......out of a nearby radio when a
    TDMA or Nextel TX is active?


    "Thomas M. Goethe" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > And the Nextel is in the same frequency range as most c-phones and has
    > more power.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Thomas M. Goethe
    >
    > "Lawrence Glasser" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > maryann wrote:
    > > >
    > > > There was a thread here a few months ago about cell phone use in
    > > > hospitals, with plenty of self righteous talk about the "dangers"
    > > > to the patients.
    > > >
    > > > I spent all of today in John Muir Hospital waiting for the gf to come

    > out
    > > > of surgery, and noticed that each and every hospital employee appears to
    > > > be equipped with a cell phone. Needless to say, they
    > > > seem to think they won't kill the patients that way.

    > >
    > > More than likely a Nextel-type system... More of a walkie-talkie
    > > than a cell phone.
    > >
    > > Larry

    >
    >






    See More: TDMA and iDEN do...




  2. #2
    Bill Roland
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    Yep. I often know I have an incoming call before the i90c starts ringing
    because I hear pulsing interference on the speakers nearby the phone for a
    second or two before it starts ringing.


    "Richard Ness" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It's not the frequency, it's the digital transmission method.
    >
    > CDMA doesn't cause much, if any interference. TDMA and Nextel
    > definitely do because TDMA (the time slots) pulse (iDEN is similar).
    >
    > Ever heard that "tick, tick, tick.......out of a nearby radio when a
    > TDMA or Nextel TX is active?
    >
    >
    > "Thomas M. Goethe" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:[email protected]
    > > And the Nextel is in the same frequency range as most c-phones and

    has
    > > more power.
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > Thomas M. Goethe
    > >
    > > "Lawrence Glasser" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > maryann wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > There was a thread here a few months ago about cell phone use in
    > > > > hospitals, with plenty of self righteous talk about the "dangers"
    > > > > to the patients.
    > > > >
    > > > > I spent all of today in John Muir Hospital waiting for the gf to

    come
    > > out
    > > > > of surgery, and noticed that each and every hospital employee

    appears to
    > > > > be equipped with a cell phone. Needless to say, they
    > > > > seem to think they won't kill the patients that way.
    > > >
    > > > More than likely a Nextel-type system... More of a walkie-talkie
    > > > than a cell phone.
    > > >
    > > > Larry

    > >
    > >

    >
    >






  3. #3
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...


    "Richard Ness" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It's not the frequency, it's the digital transmission method.
    >
    > CDMA doesn't cause much, if any interference. TDMA and Nextel
    > definitely do because TDMA (the time slots) pulse (iDEN is similar).
    >
    > Ever heard that "tick, tick, tick.......out of a nearby radio when a
    > TDMA or Nextel TX is active?
    >


    GSM phones are horrible with this (at least the PCS variety). Since GSM is
    TDMA based, it does not surprise me.

    Tom Veldhouse





  4. #4
    Hopper
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...


    "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > GSM phones are horrible with this (at least the PCS variety). Since GSM

    is
    > TDMA based, it does not surprise me.
    >
    > Tom Veldhouse
    >
    >


    It's not really TDMA based. It instead uses a system of time division. GSM
    incorporates it, but is not an extention TDMA.





  5. #5
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    Hopper wrote:
    > "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> GSM phones are horrible with this (at least the PCS variety). Since
    >> GSM is TDMA based, it does not surprise me.
    >>
    >> Tom Veldhouse
    >>
    >>

    >
    > It's not really TDMA based. It instead uses a system of time
    > division. GSM incorporates it, but is not an extention TDMA.


    Current GSM implementation is a TDMA implementation. That is not to say
    that it is a subset of the TDMA that most providers use, which is
    technically called IS-136.

    Here is a short blurb I found:

    "Short for Time Division Multiple Access, a technology for delivering
    digital wireless service using time-division multiplexing (TDM). TDMA works
    by dividing a radio frequency into time slots and then allocating slots to
    multiple calls. In this way, a single frequency can support multiple,
    simultaneous data channels. TDMA is used by the GSM digital cellular
    system."

    There is also this which gives a general layman's explanation.

    http://www.arcx.com/sites/CDMAvsTDMA.htm

    Tom Veldhouse





  6. #6
    DevilsPGD
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    In message <<[email protected]>> "Richard Ness"
    <[email protected]> did ramble:

    >Ever heard that "tick, tick, tick.......out of a nearby radio when a
    >TDMA or Nextel TX is active?


    Heard it? I rely on it, I have my phone placed near an unshielded
    speaker wire so that I can hear it ringing when it's on vibrate in the
    charger.

    --
    You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me.



  7. #7
    Michael Notforyou
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Richard Ness" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > It's not the frequency, it's the digital transmission method.
    > >
    > > CDMA doesn't cause much, if any interference. TDMA and Nextel
    > > definitely do because TDMA (the time slots) pulse (iDEN is similar).
    > >
    > > Ever heard that "tick, tick, tick.......out of a nearby radio when a
    > > TDMA or Nextel TX is active?
    > >

    >
    > GSM phones are horrible with this (at least the PCS variety). Since GSM is
    > TDMA based, it does not surprise me.
    >
    > Tom Veldhouse


    My Nokia 3390 (Cingular/old BellSouth Mobility DCS) does this, but it
    has to be RIGHT NEXT to the speaker. I can hear, "Bzz. Bzz.
    Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz. RING!" when I have it next to my laptop's
    JBLPro speakers.

    *Michael Notforyou*



  8. #8
    Al Klein
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    On 22 Nov 2003 14:28:23 -0800, [email protected] (Michael
    Notforyou) posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >My Nokia 3390 (Cingular/old BellSouth Mobility DCS) does this, but it
    >has to be RIGHT NEXT to the speaker. I can hear, "Bzz. Bzz.
    >Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz. RING!" when I have it next to my laptop's
    >JBLPro speakers.


    Good computer speakers are well shielded.



  9. #9
    Peter Pan
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...


    "Al Klein" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    > On 22 Nov 2003 14:28:23 -0800, [email protected] (Michael
    > Notforyou) posted in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >
    > >My Nokia 3390 (Cingular/old BellSouth Mobility DCS) does this, but it
    > >has to be RIGHT NEXT to the speaker. I can hear, "Bzz. Bzz.
    > >Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz. RING!" when I have it next to my laptop's
    > >JBLPro speakers.

    >
    > Good computer speakers are well shielded.


    I guess you don't like Bluetooth phones or cordless phones or stereo
    speakers or car radios or XM satellite radios or DirecTV then , cause all of
    them (and more) go ballistic and do the same thing when my friend comes over
    with his Nextel phone. Is your argument that people should be allowed to do
    whatever they want and it's up to the rest of us to shield against it? I can
    just see that sort of argument coming up, I want a nuclear reactor in my
    back yard with no shielding, and it's up to my neighbors to shield
    themselves <-- absurd example but meant to make a point. Do we have the
    legal right to limit transmissions in our own house/property or do the
    transmitters have the legal right to radiate whatever whenever they want?





  10. #10
    Carl.
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    "Hopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:2%[email protected]_s02...
    >
    > "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > GSM phones are horrible with this (at least the PCS variety). Since GSM

    > is
    > > TDMA based, it does not surprise me.
    > >
    > > Tom Veldhouse
    > >
    > >

    >
    > It's not really TDMA based. It instead uses a system of time division. GSM
    > incorporates it, but is not an extention TDMA.


    TDMA is a generic term for time division ("time division multiple access").
    I am not aware of any cell system officially called TDMA, it was merely used
    in the US to describe the only TDMA system we had (though there were others
    in the past).

    Look at one of the charts in this interference study, which refers to GSM as
    "TDMA 217Hz (1900)." The 217Hz is the time-division rate for GSM, and the
    1900 is a U.S. band.

    http://www.devicelink.com/mddi/archive/98/09/008.html


    ---
    Update your PC at http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.543 / Virus Database: 337 - Release Date: 11/21/2003





  11. #11
    Aboutdakota
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    > I guess you don't like Bluetooth phones or cordless phones or stereo
    > speakers or car radios or XM satellite radios or DirecTV then , cause all of
    > them (and more) go ballistic and do the same thing when my friend comes over
    > with his Nextel phone. Is your argument that people should be allowed to do
    > whatever they want and it's up to the rest of us to shield against it? I can
    > just see that sort of argument coming up, I want a nuclear reactor in my
    > back yard with no shielding, and it's up to my neighbors to shield
    > themselves <-- absurd example but meant to make a point. Do we have the
    > legal right to limit transmissions in our own house/property or do the
    > transmitters have the legal right to radiate whatever whenever they want?



    You have to read the FCC label on electronic deviced..."this device must
    accept any interference it receives, including interference that could
    cause undesirable operation".

    The easy way out -- don't use electricity.

    AD




  12. #12
    Al Klein
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 09:57:12 -0800, "Peter Pan"
    <[email protected]> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >I guess you don't like Bluetooth phones or cordless phones or stereo
    >speakers or car radios or XM satellite radios or DirecTV then , cause all of
    >them (and more) go ballistic and do the same thing when my friend comes over
    >with his Nextel phone. Is your argument that people should be allowed to do
    >whatever they want and it's up to the rest of us to shield against it?


    If the phone is meeting the spec under which it was licensed, yes.
    All those devices are required to operate under whatever ambient legal
    signals there are.

    > I can just see that sort of argument coming up, I want a nuclear reactor in my
    >back yard with no shielding, and it's up to my neighbors to shield
    >themselves <-- absurd example but meant to make a point.


    Too bad it didn't. Cell phones are type-approved - speakers and car
    radios aren't. If the designers can't design a device that will
    operate correctly in the presence of legal radiation, it's not the
    radiator's fault.

    > Do we have the legal right to limit transmissions in our own house/property


    No. You have the right to shield your house if you like, but you
    don;t have the right to limit what radiation people can put into
    space.

    > or do the transmitters have the legal right to radiate whatever whenever they want?


    They have the right to radiate the radiation they were approved and
    licensed for, anywhere they're licensed to radiate it.



  13. #13
    Al Klein
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...

    On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 18:04:22 -0600, Aboutdakota
    <[email protected]> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

    >You have to read the FCC label on electronic deviced..."this device must
    >accept any interference it receives, including interference that could
    >cause undesirable operation".


    The majority of the population either has no idea that provision
    exists, or doesn't like it. (Hams have been facing the situation
    since the early years of the 20th century.)



  14. #14
    Peter Pan
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...


    "Al Klein" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 18:04:22 -0600, Aboutdakota
    > <[email protected]> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:
    >
    > >You have to read the FCC label on electronic deviced..."this device must
    > >accept any interference it receives, including interference that could
    > >cause undesirable operation".

    >
    > The majority of the population either has no idea that provision
    > exists, or doesn't like it. (Hams have been facing the situation
    > since the early years of the 20th century.)


    I guess the lawyers will have a field day then. I just looked at 37 items
    here and not a single one has a label anything like that on it. Was at both
    a Circuit City and a Best Buy today and not a single item at either store
    had a label on it remotely similar. I would surmise that either such a
    label/requirement does not exist, or it is not being enforced against
    hundreds of manufacturers. Seems if there is a fine associated for not
    affixing that label to products, the FCC can start prosecuting and make
    billions of dollars. Wow, it could actually be one of the few government
    agencies that have a surplus!





  15. #15
    John R. Copeland
    Guest

    Re: TDMA and iDEN do...


    "Peter Pan" <[email protected]> wrote in message =
    news:[email protected]
    >=20
    > "Al Klein" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 18:04:22 -0600, Aboutdakota
    > > <[email protected]> posted in alt.cellular.verizon:
    > >
    > > >You have to read the FCC label on electronic deviced..."this device =

    must
    > > >accept any interference it receives, including interference that =

    could
    > > >cause undesirable operation".

    > >
    > > The majority of the population either has no idea that provision
    > > exists, or doesn't like it. (Hams have been facing the situation
    > > since the early years of the 20th century.)

    >=20
    > I guess the lawyers will have a field day then. I just looked at 37 =

    items
    > here and not a single one has a label anything like that on it. Was at =

    both
    > a Circuit City and a Best Buy today and not a single item at either =

    store
    > had a label on it remotely similar. I would surmise that either such a
    > label/requirement does not exist, or it is not being enforced against
    > hundreds of manufacturers. Seems if there is a fine associated for not
    > affixing that label to products, the FCC can start prosecuting and =

    make
    > billions of dollars. Wow, it could actually be one of the few =

    government
    > agencies that have a surplus!
    >=20
    >=20


    The label requirement is real for radio-receiving devices.
    Aboutdakota's words are a direct quote from one sentence of the notice.
    Did you look at 37 toasters, or something like that?
    ---JRC---




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