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  1. #1
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest
    In alt.cellular.verizon John Eckart <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Thanks for the informative link, MarkF. That was a very interesting video clip, which should shut some people up. I say "some" because some people are too dumb to keep their mouths shut.
    >
    > "MarkF" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >> Tech TV does the test and can be seen here:
    >>
    >> http://members.cox.net/cecole/PTT.wmv
    >>
    >> Take a look and you judge the performance difference.


    At the end of the clip, it says they also tried SPCS and SPCS is as fast as
    Nextel.

    Sounds like Verizon's rush to release PTT hurt them.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
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    See More: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT




  2. #2
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    In alt.cellular.verizon Mark Kim <[email protected]> wrote:
    > when you need to alert someone of a missing homework or something. Keep
    > in mind that Verizon, Sprint, and Nextel runs under different protocols,
    > meaning that the speed and the quality of Cellular and Push-To-Talk will
    > vary. Sprint runs under Dual-Band, All-Digital PCS, Verizon runs under
    > a Tri-Mode, Dual-Band CDMA and AMPS, and Nextel runs under Motorola
    > iDEN, which is a foundation of many Cellular Telephone Protocols, and
    > Mobile Web Protocols in one provider.



    Um.

    Sprint and Verizon use *the same* protocol. CDMA (for the PTT services,
    CDMA 1xRTT). Verizon uses 800 in most markets, 1900MHz in a few. SPCS is
    all 1900MHz. But it's all CDMA. You can't use PTT on either Sprint or Verizon
    if your phone is using an analog signal, so that's irrelevant (and on Sprint,
    if you're analog, you're roaming and probably not able to use PTT anyhow).

    I'd like to see a similar test done by TechTV, between Nextel and Sprint.

    > So Protocol Awareness should be a buying factor IMO, but you have to be
    > aware that you if you want Push-To-Talk, you will need to look inside
    > each of the service protocols (Verizon's three-mode, two-band
    > CDMA/AMPS/PCS Network, Sprint's All-Digital, Dual-Band CDMA/PCS, and
    > Nextel's iDEN, a blend of 5-6 cellular protocols in one) before you make
    > a final decision. For urgency issues, you definitely should consider
    > getting a Nextel Phone, since iDEN was made for urgency and productivity.


    iDEN is a hybrid of cellular and SMR two-way radio technology. Nextel's
    service is (Obviously!) several years more mature than that of the CDMA
    carriers.

    The point that Nextel's coverage isn't as good as the pure cellular/"PCS"
    carriers' coverage is one that shouldn't be ignored, however, if you are
    intending to use the phone as a phone as well as a two-way radio.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



  3. #3
    Mark Kim
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    Which proves that you have to test out the service before even placing
    it in the market. IMO Verizon's PTT might be a failed product due to
    the rush nature of the service....

    Steven J Sobol wrote:

    > In alt.cellular.verizon John Eckart <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Thanks for the informative link, MarkF. That was a very interesting video clip, which should shut some people up. I say "some" because some people are too dumb to keep their mouths shut.
    >>
    >>"MarkF" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>Tech TV does the test and can be seen here:
    >>>
    >>>http://members.cox.net/cecole/PTT.wmv
    >>>
    >>>Take a look and you judge the performance difference.

    >
    >
    > At the end of the clip, it says they also tried SPCS and SPCS is as fast as
    > Nextel.
    >
    > Sounds like Verizon's rush to release PTT hurt them.
    >





  4. #4
    Mark Kim
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    > Sprint and Verizon use *the same* protocol. CDMA (for the PTT services,
    > CDMA 1xRTT). Verizon uses 800 in most markets, 1900MHz in a few. SPCS is
    > all 1900MHz. But it's all CDMA. You can't use PTT on either Sprint or Verizon
    > if your phone is using an analog signal, so that's irrelevant (and on Sprint,
    > if you're analog, you're roaming and probably not able to use PTT anyhow).


    You're kidding. I thought that PCS and CDMA are different protocols,
    different transmission methods, algorithms, and cell phone schematics.
    LG's Cell Phone Website dictates that their phones for use with
    Verizon's network says "For use with Verizon Wireless 800MHz AMPS,
    800MHz CDMA, and 1900MHz PCS networks".

    So both PCS and CDMA use the same transmission methods, algorithms, and
    Cell Phone Schematics? Or is it because Verizon's phones and Sprint's
    phones uses different cellular telephone schematics?




  5. #5

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 15:34:37 GMT, Mark Kim <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> Sprint and Verizon use *the same* protocol. CDMA (for the PTT services,
    >> CDMA 1xRTT). Verizon uses 800 in most markets, 1900MHz in a few. SPCS is
    >> all 1900MHz. But it's all CDMA. You can't use PTT on either Sprint or Verizon
    >> if your phone is using an analog signal, so that's irrelevant (and on Sprint,
    >> if you're analog, you're roaming and probably not able to use PTT anyhow).

    >
    >You're kidding. I thought that PCS and CDMA are different protocols,
    >different transmission methods, algorithms, and cell phone schematics.
    >LG's Cell Phone Website dictates that their phones for use with
    >Verizon's network says "For use with Verizon Wireless 800MHz AMPS,
    >800MHz CDMA, and 1900MHz PCS networks".
    >
    >So both PCS and CDMA use the same transmission methods, algorithms, and
    >Cell Phone Schematics? Or is it because Verizon's phones and Sprint's
    >phones uses different cellular telephone schematics?


    PCS means 1900 MHz - just the frequency range. It implies nothing
    about the modulation method, etc.

    GSM is also offered in the PCS band.




  6. #6
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    In alt.cellular.sprintpcs Mark Kim <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Sprint and Verizon use *the same* protocol. CDMA (for the PTT services,
    >> CDMA 1xRTT). Verizon uses 800 in most markets, 1900MHz in a few. SPCS is
    >> all 1900MHz. But it's all CDMA. You can't use PTT on either Sprint or Verizon
    >> if your phone is using an analog signal, so that's irrelevant (and on Sprint,
    >> if you're analog, you're roaming and probably not able to use PTT anyhow).

    >
    > You're kidding. I thought that PCS and CDMA are different protocols,


    PCS is a marketing term, in my opinion, but the FCC uses it too. But it
    just refers to the *frequency.* (1900 MHz)

    AT&T has marketed their phones as Digital PCS for years and they use TDMA
    (and now GSM), completely different cellular protocols, but they are mostly
    1900 MHz so the designation fits. Sprint is all 1900.

    > So both PCS and CDMA use the same transmission methods, algorithms, and
    > Cell Phone Schematics? Or is it because Verizon's phones and Sprint's
    > phones uses different cellular telephone schematics?


    No. Stop thinking of PCS as a separate protocol. The PCS frequency is used
    by GSM, CDMA and TDMA carriers.

    Verizon, Sprint, Alltel, and a few smaller carriers all use CDMA.

    PCS refers *only* to the fact that a phone is using 1900 MHz. It could be
    running on any of the digital protocols at that frequency.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



  7. #7
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    In alt.cellular.sprintpcs Mark Kim <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Which proves that you have to test out the service before even placing
    > it in the market. IMO Verizon's PTT might be a failed product due to
    > the rush nature of the service....


    Exactly. Sprint took more time, so I wouldn't be surprised if they had the
    better service.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



  8. #8
    Mark Kim
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT


    > Verizon, Sprint, Alltel, and a few smaller carriers all use CDMA.


    Don't forget that US Cellular uses CDMA as well. So PCS is actually
    just a 1900MHz Frequency Subsidiary of a particular protocol?




  9. #9
    Richard Ness
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    PCS doesn't mean a damn thing. Just FORGET that term.
    It's meaning has been totally blurred by all the marketing hype.

    When AT&T started calling their 800Mhz TDMA "Digital PCS"
    this screwed up whatever definition the term ever had.

    PCS was SUPPOSED to refer to any digital services in the 1900Mhz frequencies.
    NOT any particular protocol, "band", carrier, phone or whatever.



    "Mark Kim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]_s53...
    >
    > > Verizon, Sprint, Alltel, and a few smaller carriers all use CDMA.

    >
    > Don't forget that US Cellular uses CDMA as well. So PCS is actually
    > just a 1900MHz Frequency Subsidiary of a particular protocol?
    >






  10. #10
    Aboutdakota
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT



    Richard Ness wrote:
    > PCS doesn't mean a damn thing. Just FORGET that term.
    > It's meaning has been totally blurred by all the marketing hype.
    >
    > When AT&T started calling their 800Mhz TDMA "Digital PCS"
    > this screwed up whatever definition the term ever had.
    >
    > PCS was SUPPOSED to refer to any digital services in the 1900Mhz frequencies.
    > NOT any particular protocol, "band", carrier, phone or whatever.


    Actually, wasn't PCS supposed to refer to any "Personal Communications
    System" no matter what frequency it was? This was even before the FCC
    auctioned off 1900 blocks.

    AD




  11. #11
    Peter Pan
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT


    "Aboutdakota" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > Richard Ness wrote:
    > > PCS doesn't mean a damn thing. Just FORGET that term.
    > > It's meaning has been totally blurred by all the marketing hype.
    > >
    > > When AT&T started calling their 800Mhz TDMA "Digital PCS"
    > > this screwed up whatever definition the term ever had.
    > >
    > > PCS was SUPPOSED to refer to any digital services in the 1900Mhz

    frequencies.
    > > NOT any particular protocol, "band", carrier, phone or whatever.

    >
    > Actually, wasn't PCS supposed to refer to any "Personal Communications
    > System" no matter what frequency it was? This was even before the FCC
    > auctioned off 1900 blocks.
    >
    > AD
    >


    When I was working at Sprint they used to tell us it mean Pretty Clear
    Sound.





  12. #12
    Bob Smith
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT


    "Mark Kim" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s53...
    >
    > > Verizon, Sprint, Alltel, and a few smaller carriers all use CDMA.

    >
    > Don't forget that US Cellular uses CDMA as well. So PCS is actually
    > just a 1900MHz Frequency Subsidiary of a particular protocol?
    >

    No, it's just a frequency, that 3 different protocols use ...

    Bob





  13. #13
    Mark Kim
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    I don't know if Nextel has any plans to deploy 1900MHz frequency since
    they only invest whatever is stable for the majority customer base....

    Bob Smith wrote:

    > "Mark Kim" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]_s53...
    >
    >>>Verizon, Sprint, Alltel, and a few smaller carriers all use CDMA.

    >>
    >>Don't forget that US Cellular uses CDMA as well. So PCS is actually
    >>just a 1900MHz Frequency Subsidiary of a particular protocol?
    >>

    >
    > No, it's just a frequency, that 3 different protocols use ...
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >





  14. #14
    JRW
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    [email protected] wrote:

    > PCS means 1900 MHz - just the frequency range. It implies nothing
    > about the modulation method, etc.


    That's what I thought too, so when I saw AT&T claiming PCS on 800 MHz,
    I thought they were a little liberal in their terminology. Eventual
    research showed that PCS generically refers to an enhanced
    communications service (my words as I don't recall the exact wording)
    such as SMS.

    This was like seven years ago - about the same time Sprint hit
    the Dallas market. I believe AT&T is all 1900 MHz here now.




  15. #15
    Thomas M. Goethe
    Guest

    Re: NEXTEL vs Verizon PTT

    "Mark Kim" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s02...
    > I don't know if Nextel has any plans to deploy 1900MHz frequency since
    > they only invest whatever is stable for the majority customer base....
    >


    Nextel uses two-way radio frequencies, not telephone frequencies. I am
    not sure, but I don't think that there is any spectrum for two-ways in 1900.


    --
    Thomas M. Goethe





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