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  1. #1
    Bob Smith
    Guest
    Interesting article I noticed, under Tech News on my home page. It puts the
    recent merger between Cingular & ATTWS in perspective. This article also
    mentioned that Verizon offered some kind of deal to SPCS in January, which
    was declined, by an unnamed source.

    http://apnews.myway.com//article/200...D80RBCJG0.html

    Bob





    See More: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor




  2. #2
    Scott Stephenson
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor


    "Bob Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Interesting article I noticed, under Tech News on my home page. It puts

    the
    > recent merger between Cingular & ATTWS in perspective. This article also
    > mentioned that Verizon offered some kind of deal to SPCS in January, which
    > was declined, by an unnamed source.
    >
    > http://apnews.myway.com//article/200...D80RBCJG0.html
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >


    Interesting, because that's about the same time that the rumor on the street
    was that in order to get PCS, you'd have to buy the whole corporation.





  3. #3

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    So..... Verizon was knocking on Sprints door! Hmmmm


    "Bob Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Interesting article I noticed, under Tech News on my home page. It puts

    the
    > recent merger between Cingular & ATTWS in perspective. This article also
    > mentioned that Verizon offered some kind of deal to SPCS in January, which
    > was declined, by an unnamed source.
    >
    > http://apnews.myway.com//article/200...D80RBCJG0.html
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >






  4. #4
    Robert M.
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor


    >
    >
    > "Bob Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Interesting article I noticed, under Tech News on my home page. It puts

    > the
    > > recent merger between Cingular & ATTWS in perspective. This article also
    > > mentioned that Verizon offered some kind of deal to SPCS in January, which
    > > was declined, by an unnamed source.
    > >
    > > http://apnews.myway.com//article/200...D80RBCJG0.html
    > >
    > > Bob




    Interesting URL. It says in part:

    " Nextel's 12.9 million subscribers pay among the highest monthly bills
    in the wireless industry, an average of $69 per month in 2003. And the
    company's "churn" rate, a measure of how many of the customers close
    their accounts, averaged just 1.6 percent per month last year.

    By contrast, Verizon Wireless' 37.5 million customers generated an
    average monthly bill of just $49, though its churn rate was an
    impressive 1.8 percent. Cingular showed an average monthly bill of $51
    with a churn rate of 2.7 percent, while the numbers at AT&T Wireless
    were $60 a month and 2.6 percent churn. "

    ==============

    Sprint PCS by comparison in it slatest filing with the SEC listed:

    http://www.sprint.com/sprint/ir/fn/qe/4q03.pdf

    Page 6 - a monthly churn of 2.7 % in Q4 - {poor},
    and " the PCS Group experienced an increase in churn in December
    following WLNP implementation "

    monthly bill per user of $62 (not per number, per user) - {good}
    and a cost to acquire a new customer of $425 - {poor}

    ({good} and {poor} are my own editorial comments.)


    as compares:
    http://news.vzw.com/investor/4thqand...sultstoben.pdf

    Says Verizons Q4 churn was 1.68%; better than the 1.8% full year churn
    =============================================

    One always wonders whether every company uses the == EXACT == same
    methodlogy of calculating these things, or from time to time slightly
    changes their metrics so as to make their numbers trend in the desired
    direction.

    Sprint PCS interestingly talks about their monthly churn as Quarterly
    rate of churn, which has mislead some in here to think the churn rates
    are for a quarter rather than monthly numbers.



  5. #5
    plane
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    "Robert M." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > >
    > > "Bob Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > Interesting article I noticed, under Tech News on my home page. It puts

    > the
    > > > recent merger between Cingular & ATTWS in perspective. This article also
    > > > mentioned that Verizon offered some kind of deal to SPCS in January, which
    > > > was declined, by an unnamed source.
    > > >
    > > > http://apnews.myway.com//article/200...D80RBCJG0.html
    > > >
    > > > Bob

    >
    >
    >
    > Interesting URL. It says in part:
    >
    > " Nextel's 12.9 million subscribers pay among the highest monthly bills
    > in the wireless industry, an average of $69 per month in 2003. And the
    > company's "churn" rate, a measure of how many of the customers close
    > their accounts, averaged just 1.6 percent per month last year.
    >
    > By contrast, Verizon Wireless' 37.5 million customers generated an
    > average monthly bill of just $49, though its churn rate was an
    > impressive 1.8 percent. Cingular showed an average monthly bill of $51
    > with a churn rate of 2.7 percent, while the numbers at AT&T Wireless
    > were $60 a month and 2.6 percent churn. "
    >
    > ==============
    >
    > Sprint PCS by comparison in it slatest filing with the SEC listed:
    >
    > http://www.sprint.com/sprint/ir/fn/qe/4q03.pdf
    >
    > Page 6 - a monthly churn of 2.7 % in Q4 - {poor},
    > and " the PCS Group experienced an increase in churn in December
    > following WLNP implementation "
    >
    > monthly bill per user of $62 (not per number, per user) - {good}
    > and a cost to acquire a new customer of $425 - {poor}
    >
    > ({good} and {poor} are my own editorial comments.)
    >
    >
    > as compares:
    > http://news.vzw.com/investor/4thqand...sultstoben.pdf
    >
    > Says Verizons Q4 churn was 1.68%; better than the 1.8% full year churn
    > =============================================
    >
    > One always wonders whether every company uses the == EXACT == same
    > methodlogy of calculating these things, or from time to time slightly
    > changes their metrics so as to make their numbers trend in the desired
    > direction.
    >
    > Sprint PCS interestingly talks about their monthly churn as Quarterly
    > rate of churn, which has mislead some in here to think the churn rates
    > are for a quarter rather than monthly numbers.


    Interesting info; have you all noticed how much nextel is advertising
    lately-virtually every day in usa today, and now the nascar race
    thing.

    With both verizon and sprint now offering at least a similar ptt
    service, I would imagine they are really desperate to try to capture
    whatever market they can but it would seem nextel can only hope to
    capture whatever comercial business in or near the large metro area,
    where their ptt will work, since their cell coverage away fromthe
    metro area's seems spotty



  6. #6
    Scott Stephenson
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor


    "plane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > Interesting info; have you all noticed how much nextel is advertising
    > lately-virtually every day in usa today, and now the nascar race
    > thing.
    >
    > With both verizon and sprint now offering at least a similar ptt
    > service, I would imagine they are really desperate to try to capture
    > whatever market they can but it would seem nextel can only hope to
    > capture whatever comercial business in or near the large metro area,
    > where their ptt will work, since their cell coverage away fromthe
    > metro area's seems spotty


    I think what you are seeing is Nextel finally trying to get into the
    consumer market. Most of the business market is pretty provided for, and
    Nextel is now marketing to the consumer. I don't think that commercials of
    Junior scoring a touchdownin his car, or a face plate with his car colors on
    it are intended for the corporate boardroom.

    The coverage is an issue, but they announced a pretty aggressive buildout
    for 2004, and its possible that they could start providing quality coverage
    by the middle of next year, if they are serious about building out. Keep in
    mind that they are also the only national provider that doesn't have have a
    big telecom backing them up, and unlike a fair number of their competitors,
    they are profitable.





  7. #7
    Scott Nelson
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    Not to mention the fact that, iDen isn't exactly known worldwide for roaming
    capabilities.
    It would be better for them to get some kind of GAIT phone and partner with
    a GSM carrier in the US and do like SprintPCS does and charge .50 a minute
    for roaming or an FC&A plan like Sprint does.

    It takes a lot of money to build out a network and like DSL, Cable TV, etc.,
    you have to be able to make the investment pay for itself over time.
    Carriers know that the MSA's is where the $$$ is.
    RSA's ( Rural Service Areas ) don't really have a big issue of high minute
    usage and are harder to pay off.
    The A and B bands for years, pushed the "we have better coverage, blah blah
    blah" schpeal, way before the other PCS/SMR carriers came on the scene. If
    Sprint, Verizon or one of the other carriers with more coverage make a PPT
    system that kick but feature-wise and has more coverage, Nextel has no
    choice but to offer lower plan rates or some other desperate way to keep
    customers.
    Unless Nextel makes it's system shine better than Verizon or Sprint, and get
    some kind of roaming in the US, Nextel will slowly start to lose
    non-business consumers. Unlimited incoming is great, unless you can't get
    any signal, then it's pretty much a 'brick' with a battery. ;-)
    Towers/sites, spectrum and Land rental to put the towers on, techs to fix
    the towers/system, etc all add up.
    Nextel has some huge growing pains ahead.
    Of course, if you live in a big city and never go anywhere, all of this is
    academic anyway.

    I.....must ....stop...rambling now........ ;-)

    Scotty


    "Scott Stephenson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "plane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > >
    > > Interesting info; have you all noticed how much nextel is advertising
    > > lately-virtually every day in usa today, and now the nascar race
    > > thing.
    > >
    > > With both verizon and sprint now offering at least a similar ptt
    > > service, I would imagine they are really desperate to try to capture
    > > whatever market they can but it would seem nextel can only hope to
    > > capture whatever comercial business in or near the large metro area,
    > > where their ptt will work, since their cell coverage away fromthe
    > > metro area's seems spotty

    >
    > I think what you are seeing is Nextel finally trying to get into the
    > consumer market. Most of the business market is pretty provided for, and
    > Nextel is now marketing to the consumer. I don't think that commercials

    of
    > Junior scoring a touchdownin his car, or a face plate with his car colors

    on
    > it are intended for the corporate boardroom.
    >
    > The coverage is an issue, but they announced a pretty aggressive buildout
    > for 2004, and its possible that they could start providing quality

    coverage
    > by the middle of next year, if they are serious about building out. Keep

    in
    > mind that they are also the only national provider that doesn't have have

    a
    > big telecom backing them up, and unlike a fair number of their

    competitors,
    > they are profitable.
    >
    >






  8. #8
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    Scott Nelson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Not to mention the fact that, iDen isn't exactly known worldwide for roaming
    > capabilities.


    My father has a Motorola i95, which roams just fine on GSM networks.
    (Obviously, it's a hybrid iDEN/GSM handset. It is one of the few Nextel
    phones that requires a SIM.)

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, Apple Valley, CA
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / [email protected]
    PGP: C57E 8B25 F994 D6D0 5F6B B961 EA08 9410 E3AE 35ED




  9. #9
    Scott Stephenson
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor


    "Scott Nelson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Not to mention the fact that, iDen isn't exactly known worldwide for

    roaming
    > capabilities.
    > It would be better for them to get some kind of GAIT phone and partner

    with
    > a GSM carrier in the US and do like SprintPCS does and charge .50 a minute
    > for roaming or an FC&A plan like Sprint does.
    >
    > It takes a lot of money to build out a network and like DSL, Cable TV,

    etc.,
    > you have to be able to make the investment pay for itself over time.
    > Carriers know that the MSA's is where the $$$ is.
    > RSA's ( Rural Service Areas ) don't really have a big issue of high minute
    > usage and are harder to pay off.
    > The A and B bands for years, pushed the "we have better coverage, blah

    blah
    > blah" schpeal, way before the other PCS/SMR carriers came on the scene. If
    > Sprint, Verizon or one of the other carriers with more coverage make a PPT
    > system that kick but feature-wise and has more coverage, Nextel has no
    > choice but to offer lower plan rates or some other desperate way to keep
    > customers.
    > Unless Nextel makes it's system shine better than Verizon or Sprint, and

    get
    > some kind of roaming in the US, Nextel will slowly start to lose
    > non-business consumers. Unlimited incoming is great, unless you can't get
    > any signal, then it's pretty much a 'brick' with a battery. ;-)
    > Towers/sites, spectrum and Land rental to put the towers on, techs to fix
    > the towers/system, etc all add up.
    > Nextel has some huge growing pains ahead.
    > Of course, if you live in a big city and never go anywhere, all of this is
    > academic anyway.
    >


    All very valid points, with the lack of roaming to expand coverage probably
    being the most important. And just when I get ready to agree with all of
    these points, I see an article just like the one that started this thread.
    They have consistantly had the lowest churn in the industry for well over a
    year, and they get the most money out of their customers by quite a large
    margin. Their customer base has grown by around 40% in the last two years,
    and it would appear that portability has no effect. All of these point to a
    happy and loyal customer base, which makes me wonder just how bad the
    coverage issue really is. Could it be an urban myth?

    With that said, they have done some interesting thins in the last year that
    might be their 'new advantage'. They bought Boost Mobile and plan to start
    rolling it out nationally. An interesting brand that is targeted and
    marketed to the younger market, which could tap the most desired remaining
    demographic out there. A "cool" company owned prepaid brand (which is not
    currently reported in subscriber count) could lead the way to a huge number
    of new subscribers And last month, they announced a test of wireless data
    with speeds that are supposed to rival cable. It has been described as 4G
    technology, and from this seat, it appears to be a goo indication of the
    future of this industry. Ask any CEO of a major cellular provider where
    they want the business to go, and I'll bet you get the same answer- wireless
    data. It may be that with this Flarion technology Nextel is testing, they
    are jumping to the head of the class in this arena. This may be their new
    competitive advantage.

    If nothing else, they have proven tobe very cautious and slow in rolling out
    new technology, so it may be a couple of years before either of these really
    reap benefits. Until then, they can try to enter the comsumer market as is.
    Being profitable doesn't hurt.





  10. #10
    Scott Stephenson
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor


    "Steven J Sobol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Scott Nelson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Not to mention the fact that, iDen isn't exactly known worldwide for

    roaming
    > > capabilities.

    >
    > My father has a Motorola i95, which roams just fine on GSM networks.
    > (Obviously, it's a hybrid iDEN/GSM handset. It is one of the few Nextel
    > phones that requires a SIM.)
    >

    They are all SIM based now- its been a couple of years now- I think the
    i2000 was the first.





  11. #11
    Scott Nelson
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    I knew they had GSM abroad. Just no roaming agreements with CONUS GSM
    Carriers.
    It would be a good thing for them to do a roaming deal with Cingular.

    Scotty


    "Steven J Sobol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Scott Nelson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Not to mention the fact that, iDen isn't exactly known worldwide for

    roaming
    > > capabilities.

    >
    > My father has a Motorola i95, which roams just fine on GSM networks.
    > (Obviously, it's a hybrid iDEN/GSM handset. It is one of the few Nextel
    > phones that requires a SIM.)
    >
    > --
    > JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, Apple Valley, CA
    > Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) /

    [email protected]
    > PGP: C57E 8B25 F994 D6D0 5F6B B961 EA08 9410 E3AE 35ED
    >






  12. #12
    Scott Nelson
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    Very true.
    Churn for business users though, are usually a lot lower than regular
    non-business customers who want seemingly stupid things for free.
    Plus the fact that Nextel doesn't have CS support open past a certain time,
    which for the residential market would be a big thing.

    It's a hard road to pick up the non-business user and keep them happy.
    Sprint, on the opposite side, has to learn how to court the business user
    so, they also have a hard road ahead as well.
    Business users typically don't move to another carrier over a free Jabra ear
    phone or some other prize.
    They are usually concerned with "can I get a hold of John Doe for a service
    call" or some other service related thing.
    Whole different paradigm for both companies.

    It will be interesting to see what happens during the next few years. ;-)

    Scotty


    "Scott Stephenson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Scott Nelson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Not to mention the fact that, iDen isn't exactly known worldwide for

    > roaming
    > > capabilities.
    > > It would be better for them to get some kind of GAIT phone and partner

    > with
    > > a GSM carrier in the US and do like SprintPCS does and charge .50 a

    minute
    > > for roaming or an FC&A plan like Sprint does.
    > >
    > > It takes a lot of money to build out a network and like DSL, Cable TV,

    > etc.,
    > > you have to be able to make the investment pay for itself over time.
    > > Carriers know that the MSA's is where the $$$ is.
    > > RSA's ( Rural Service Areas ) don't really have a big issue of high

    minute
    > > usage and are harder to pay off.
    > > The A and B bands for years, pushed the "we have better coverage, blah

    > blah
    > > blah" schpeal, way before the other PCS/SMR carriers came on the scene.

    If
    > > Sprint, Verizon or one of the other carriers with more coverage make a

    PPT
    > > system that kick but feature-wise and has more coverage, Nextel has no
    > > choice but to offer lower plan rates or some other desperate way to keep
    > > customers.
    > > Unless Nextel makes it's system shine better than Verizon or Sprint, and

    > get
    > > some kind of roaming in the US, Nextel will slowly start to lose
    > > non-business consumers. Unlimited incoming is great, unless you can't

    get
    > > any signal, then it's pretty much a 'brick' with a battery. ;-)
    > > Towers/sites, spectrum and Land rental to put the towers on, techs to

    fix
    > > the towers/system, etc all add up.
    > > Nextel has some huge growing pains ahead.
    > > Of course, if you live in a big city and never go anywhere, all of this

    is
    > > academic anyway.
    > >

    >
    > All very valid points, with the lack of roaming to expand coverage

    probably
    > being the most important. And just when I get ready to agree with all of
    > these points, I see an article just like the one that started this thread.
    > They have consistantly had the lowest churn in the industry for well over

    a
    > year, and they get the most money out of their customers by quite a large
    > margin. Their customer base has grown by around 40% in the last two

    years,
    > and it would appear that portability has no effect. All of these point to

    a
    > happy and loyal customer base, which makes me wonder just how bad the
    > coverage issue really is. Could it be an urban myth?
    >
    > With that said, they have done some interesting thins in the last year

    that
    > might be their 'new advantage'. They bought Boost Mobile and plan to

    start
    > rolling it out nationally. An interesting brand that is targeted and
    > marketed to the younger market, which could tap the most desired remaining
    > demographic out there. A "cool" company owned prepaid brand (which is not
    > currently reported in subscriber count) could lead the way to a huge

    number
    > of new subscribers And last month, they announced a test of wireless data
    > with speeds that are supposed to rival cable. It has been described as 4G
    > technology, and from this seat, it appears to be a goo indication of the
    > future of this industry. Ask any CEO of a major cellular provider where
    > they want the business to go, and I'll bet you get the same answer-

    wireless
    > data. It may be that with this Flarion technology Nextel is testing, they
    > are jumping to the head of the class in this arena. This may be their new
    > competitive advantage.
    >
    > If nothing else, they have proven tobe very cautious and slow in rolling

    out
    > new technology, so it may be a couple of years before either of these

    really
    > reap benefits. Until then, they can try to enter the comsumer market as

    is.
    > Being profitable doesn't hurt.
    >
    >






  13. #13
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    Scott Stephenson wrote:


    > Interesting, because that's about the same time that the rumor on the street
    > was that in order to get PCS, you'd have to buy the whole corporation.


    Oh, that's not a rumor. I honestly don't know what AT&T was thinking by
    spinning off AT&T wireless. Landline telephone service is in decline,
    as the "glory days" of ILECs when people wanted more than one phone line
    for voice, dial-up data and fax services are long gone. Anyone with a
    brain knows that for a little more than the price of a comprehensive
    long distance package, they can get a cell phone plan that includes
    domestic LD. And data services are still feeling the pinch... we still
    have a huge fiber glut in the US. The only true growth sector is
    wireless. Sprint would be stupid to sell off their wireless holdings,
    without putting the rest of the company up for sale with it.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.




  14. #14
    John Cummings
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    "Scott Nelson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    > I knew they had GSM abroad. Just no roaming agreements with CONUS GSM
    > Carriers.
    > It would be a good thing for them to do a roaming deal with Cingular.
    >
    > Scotty


    The dual-mode phones like the i2000 have included
    900 MHz GSM along with 800 MHz SMR iDEN. No USA
    GSM service provider offers 900 MHz, only 800
    and 1900 MHz.

    John C.





  15. #15
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Size Is Not Biggest Cell Phone Factor

    Scott Stephenson wrote:


    >
    > All very valid points, with the lack of roaming to expand coverage probably
    > being the most important. And just when I get ready to agree with all of
    > these points, I see an article just like the one that started this thread.
    > They have consistantly had the lowest churn in the industry for well over a
    > year, and they get the most money out of their customers by quite a large
    > margin. Their customer base has grown by around 40% in the last two years,
    > and it would appear that portability has no effect. All of these point to a
    > happy and loyal customer base, which makes me wonder just how bad the
    > coverage issue really is. Could it be an urban myth?




    No, it most certainly isn't. Nextel's bread and butter is their
    business and corporate client base. The low churn is easily explained
    by the reluctance of businesses to write off equipment they've invested
    in and purchase new equipment in order to change carriers... not to
    mention the termination fees on their contracts. Have you ever seen a
    business - especially a large one - willing to switch carriers easily?
    Of course not. A business wanting to switch from Nextel would wind up
    with a large number of useless Nextel handsets that no one wants and
    that they've spent a lot of money on, and they would still have to
    purchase and deploy all new equipment to their employees. Because of
    that, if a large business can get away with marginal service, then they
    will be likely to just resign themselves to being stuck rather than
    switching carriers. Nextel doesn't cater too much to the consumer
    market because they know consumers will be more eager to switch.
    Business on the other hand, won't fix what they can argue isn't *too*
    broken.

    I've tried Nextel three times from 1997 through 2003. The first time, I
    was kinda forced into singing up for Nextel because they were the only
    carrier that served the two places I spent the most time in: West Texas
    and New York/New Jersey (Sprint didn't cover West Texas in '97, and
    Verizon wasn't Verizon yet... it was still Bell Atlantic Mobile,
    Airtouch, PrimeCo and GTE Mobilnet). Nextel didn't cover either area
    very well at all, but because I needed service in both areas, I had to
    put up with what marginal service I had.

    Rest assured that when the moment Alamosa PCS put up towers in West
    Texas to sell service under the Sprint PCS name, not only did I sign
    back with them, but I manged to be on the West Texas "charter group" of
    customers... the people who had Sprint PCS service a full 45 days before
    it was officially launched in the area. I even remarked when I canceled
    my Nextel service how sad it was that Sprint covered the area better on
    its launch than Nextel did after 18 months of being in the same market
    (Sprint had a couple coverage holes at first, but they patched them up
    very quickly before the official launch).

    Since then I've gotten "we want you back" postcards from Nextel every so
    often, promising better coverage and service. No dice each time.
    Service provisioning still took more than 24 hours (in one instance it
    took three days and ultimately required manual provisioning from an
    upper-level tech), coverage was still spotty in the same areas they were
    before, and sound quality was poor. Fortunately, I had the presence of
    mind to not cancel my Sprint account until I was certain I wanted to go
    back to Nextel, so I never cut off service with them. The Nextel phones
    always went back with poor reviews from me.



    > With that said, they have done some interesting thins in the last year that
    > might be their 'new advantage'. They bought Boost Mobile and plan to start
    > rolling it out nationally.


    We'll have to see how this goes. Considering Boost Mobile was really a
    Nextel-dependent service anyway, I don't see too much happening there.
    IIRC, Boost also doesn't really offer the direct connect feature.

    > And last month, they announced a test of wireless data
    > with speeds that are supposed to rival cable. It has been described as 4G
    > technology, and from this seat, it appears to be a goo indication of the
    > future of this industry.


    Hehe... yes, and Nextel also once claimed that by now, they'd be running
    CDMA. I don't expect this to materialize anytime soon either.


    > If nothing else, they have proven tobe very cautious and slow in rolling out
    > new technology,



    Not cautious and slow... rather, limited in resources. Nextel still has
    a spectrum crunch, and a lot of the spectrum they do have is fragmented
    in the SMR band. Any new service roll out is hamstrung by this, as 3G
    (and I suspect their vapoware "4G") requires contiguous spectrum to be
    functional. Further, the spectrum they do have is closely adjacent to
    public safety channels, and many in law enforcement have made no secret
    of the fact that they are unhappy with the way Nextel's service
    interferes with their communications.




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