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  1. #1
    Freewheeling
    Guest
    Hi:

    I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has too
    much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot of
    long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell phone as
    a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations about
    an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that may have
    minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess a GPS
    indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though, come to
    think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag. Also,
    is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily thinking of
    using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other kinds of
    "emergency" calls.

    Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since I've
    used a wireless phone.


    --
    --Scott
    [email protected]
    Cut the "tail" to send email.





    See More: Recommendations for "security phone?"




  2. #2
    John
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    I've heard that any wireless phone will connect to 911 service
    regardless of active contract.

    How inexpensive do you want to be?


    On Sun, 21 Mar 2004 17:49:54 GMT, "Freewheeling"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi:
    >
    >I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has too
    >much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot of
    >long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell phone as
    >a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations about
    >an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that may have
    >minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess a GPS
    >indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though, come to
    >think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    >inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag. Also,
    >is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    >doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily thinking of
    >using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other kinds of
    >"emergency" calls.
    >
    >Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since I've
    >used a wireless phone.





  3. #3
    Andrew White
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi:
    >
    >I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has too
    >much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot of
    >long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell phone as
    >a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations about
    >an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that may have
    >minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess a GPS
    >indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though, come to
    >think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    >inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag. Also,
    >is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    >doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily thinking of
    >using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other kinds of
    >"emergency" calls.
    >
    >Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since I've
    >used a wireless phone.


    You have a lot of conflicting wishes. If you just wanted to place 911
    calls, you can buy any analog phone in existence and you don't have to
    sign it up with any carrier and pay monthly fees. By law you will
    still be allowed to make free 911 calls from this phone anywhere in
    the country where there is coverage. You don't need a multi-band phone
    since analog service is ubiquitous.

    If you wanted to occasionally place other calls, that's a totally
    different ball game and there are lots of cheap and not-so-cheap
    solutions, such as prepaid cellular like Virgin or AT&T Go phone, or a
    really cheap monthly service. There are still some corporate plans
    that don't include any minutes that can be found for $7-10 a month. Of
    course, you have to be an employee of a company that is eligible for
    such a plan.



  4. #4
    SCott
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    Any tri-band CDMA or TDMA phone should do. There are so many, I
    wouldn't even try to suggest one. However, later models incorporate a
    GPS locator function. You don't have to have it activated with a
    provider to dial 911. As long as the phone gets a signal, you can
    make 911 calls. I suggest tri-band because it will have the greatest
    change of getting a signal, digital or analog.

    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi:
    >
    > I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has too
    > much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot of
    > long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell phone as
    > a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations about
    > an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that may have
    > minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess a GPS
    > indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though, come to
    > think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    > inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag. Also,
    > is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    > doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily thinking of
    > using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other kinds of
    > "emergency" calls.
    >
    > Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since I've
    > used a wireless phone.




  5. #5
    TechGeek
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    John <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've heard that any wireless phone will connect to 911 service
    > regardless of active contract.
    >
    > How inexpensive do you want to be?
    >
    >

    That is true, the FCC states that ANY wireless phone has to be able to
    connect to 911 regardless of the account standing with the provider.
    Many people still keep an old 'car phone' in their car just for this
    purpose. As long as you can pick up any signal, you can call 911.

    Most providers, though, also allow the phone to call their cusotmer
    service if it's inactive, too.



  6. #6
    Dean M
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    Nokia 5160i: eBay mint $20 Tri-mode, bulletproof, cheap accessories
    +
    CallPlus (or Locus Mobile) prepaid service from "www.pharosint.com" $11
    ________________________________
    Prepaid service, all you have to do is make one call per 30 days. They give you
    100 minutes as a starter package, and the minutes are good for 90 days. The you
    can buy $10 refills, giving you cell service for $3.33 per month. And as long as
    you stay current, all your minutes carry over!!!

    HTH,
    Dean
    _________________________________________
    Freewheeling wrote:

    > Hi:
    >
    > I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has too
    > much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot of
    > long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell phone as
    > a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations about
    > an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that may have
    > minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess a GPS
    > indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though, come to
    > think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    > inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag. Also,
    > is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    > doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily thinking of
    > using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other kinds of
    > "emergency" calls.
    >
    > Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since I've
    > used a wireless phone.
    >
    > --
    > --Scott
    > [email protected]
    > Cut the "tail" to send email.





  7. #7
    Robert M.
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (TechGeek) wrote:

    > John <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I've heard that any wireless phone will connect to 911 service
    > > regardless of active contract.
    > >
    > > How inexpensive do you want to be?
    > >
    > >

    > That is true, the FCC states that ANY wireless phone has to be able to
    > connect to 911 regardless of the account standing with the provider.
    > Many people still keep an old 'car phone' in their car just for this
    > purpose. As long as you can pick up any signal, you can call 911.
    >
    > Most providers, though, also allow the phone to call their cusotmer
    > service if it's inactive, too.



    If an unactive SprintPCS phone is used to call any number other than
    911, it will only connect to Customer Service. That also is the way most
    other carriers do it.



  8. #8
    Steven M. Scharf
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"


    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    <snip>

    > Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since I've
    > used a wireless phone.


    Get an old TDMA/AMPS phone and activate it on CallPlus via
    PharosInternational. As little as $3.33/month. But even if you don't
    activate it, or forget to buy $10 worth of time every three months, you can
    still make emergency calls to 911.

    Tracfone will cost you $6.67/month to keep active ($20 every three months),
    but it's a little better than CallPlus if you get one of their CDMA/AMPS
    phones.

    As to tossing it in a bike bag, you're going to have to keep it charged, so
    that won't work that well. You can buy dynamos for bicycles that hook up to
    cell phones to charge them. You can also buy little thingees that use three
    AAA batteries to charge your cellphone in an emergency.





  9. #9
    Freewheeling
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    Dean:

    Thanks. Those are useful recommendations.

    --
    --Scott
    "Dean M" <"dean173"@yahoo.com(change to aol)> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    > Nokia 5160i: eBay mint $20 Tri-mode, bulletproof, cheap

    accessories
    > +
    > CallPlus (or Locus Mobile) prepaid service from "www.pharosint.com" $11
    > ________________________________
    > Prepaid service, all you have to do is make one call per 30 days. They

    give you
    > 100 minutes as a starter package, and the minutes are good for 90 days.

    The you
    > can buy $10 refills, giving you cell service for $3.33 per month. And as

    long as
    > you stay current, all your minutes carry over!!!
    >
    > HTH,
    > Dean
    > _________________________________________
    > Freewheeling wrote:
    >
    > > Hi:
    > >
    > > I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has too
    > > much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot of
    > > long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell phone

    as
    > > a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations

    about
    > > an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that may

    have
    > > minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess a

    GPS
    > > indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though, come

    to
    > > think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    > > inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag.

    Also,
    > > is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    > > doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily

    thinking of
    > > using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other kinds

    of
    > > "emergency" calls.
    > >
    > > Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since

    I've
    > > used a wireless phone.
    > >
    > > --
    > > --Scott
    > > [email protected]
    > > Cut the "tail" to send email.

    >






  10. #10
    Freewheeling
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    One question, does it matter whether the phone is for Cingular, Verizon or
    Sprint? There are apparently all three available on ebay. Will all work
    with pharos ?

    --
    --Scott
    "Dean M" <"dean173"@yahoo.com(change to aol)> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    > Nokia 5160i: eBay mint $20 Tri-mode, bulletproof, cheap

    accessories
    > +
    > CallPlus (or Locus Mobile) prepaid service from "www.pharosint.com" $11
    > ________________________________
    > Prepaid service, all you have to do is make one call per 30 days. They

    give you
    > 100 minutes as a starter package, and the minutes are good for 90 days.

    The you
    > can buy $10 refills, giving you cell service for $3.33 per month. And as

    long as
    > you stay current, all your minutes carry over!!!
    >
    > HTH,
    > Dean
    > _________________________________________
    > Freewheeling wrote:
    >
    > > Hi:
    > >
    > > I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has too
    > > much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot of
    > > long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell phone

    as
    > > a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations

    about
    > > an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that may

    have
    > > minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess a

    GPS
    > > indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though, come

    to
    > > think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    > > inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag.

    Also,
    > > is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    > > doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily

    thinking of
    > > using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other kinds

    of
    > > "emergency" calls.
    > >
    > > Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since

    I've
    > > used a wireless phone.
    > >
    > > --
    > > --Scott
    > > [email protected]
    > > Cut the "tail" to send email.

    >






  11. #11
    Scott Nelson - Wash DC
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    There are some exceptions but, the rule of thumb is, try to buy a phone that
    was on a particular carriers network before.
    If you don't know, I wouldn't take a chance, since you are using it for 911
    stuff, don't skimp.

    If you get a phone, I would really recommend Verizon as they have more
    coverage and you won't have to worry about a GAIT phone or multi protocol
    phone. You want to be able to make a calls. Period.
    Your situation is different than the average person who pretty much stays in
    their area, more or less.

    Get something that you can get an extra battery for and make sure it's easy
    to change the battery. Avoid the phones that you have to remove covers and
    unscrew this or that. You can keep your phone off really, unless you are
    expecting a call that day.
    With a travel charger, spare battery and emergency battery adapter kit that
    lets you use a 9 volt battery in an emergency, you will be traveling light
    and still get good service.

    It's also a good idea to pre-program the speed dials for all of your
    emergency contacts, in case something happens, any passer-by can just start
    dialing your pre-programmed numbers and not have to look very far.

    Scotty


    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > One question, does it matter whether the phone is for Cingular, Verizon or
    > Sprint? There are apparently all three available on ebay. Will all work
    > with pharos ?
    >
    > --
    > --Scott
    > "Dean M" <"dean173"@yahoo.com(change to aol)> wrote in message
    > news:%[email protected]
    > > Nokia 5160i: eBay mint $20 Tri-mode, bulletproof, cheap

    > accessories
    > > +
    > > CallPlus (or Locus Mobile) prepaid service from "www.pharosint.com"

    $11
    > > ________________________________
    > > Prepaid service, all you have to do is make one call per 30 days. They

    > give you
    > > 100 minutes as a starter package, and the minutes are good for 90 days.

    > The you
    > > can buy $10 refills, giving you cell service for $3.33 per month. And as

    > long as
    > > you stay current, all your minutes carry over!!!
    > >
    > > HTH,
    > > Dean
    > > _________________________________________
    > > Freewheeling wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi:
    > > >
    > > > I don't have an cell phone account because the area where I live has

    too
    > > > much radio interference (near a marine/fbi facility). But I do a lot

    of
    > > > long distance cycling, and have been thinking about getting a cell

    phone
    > as
    > > > a security measure. I'm wondering if you'd have some recommendations

    > about
    > > > an inexpensive multi-band device (since I'll be in rural areas that

    may
    > have
    > > > minimal digital coverage, alot), with no bells and whistles. (I guess

    a
    > GPS
    > > > indentifier might be a good thing to have in a cell phone, though,

    come
    > to
    > > > think of it.) I'm just looking for something small, light weight, and
    > > > inexpensive that I could pick up on ebay and just toss in a bike bag.

    > Also,
    > > > is it possible to buy a certain amount of time on such a network that
    > > > doesn't expire if it's not used for long periods? I'm primarily

    > thinking of
    > > > using the item for 911 but it would be nice if I could make other

    kinds
    > of
    > > > "emergency" calls.
    > > >
    > > > Sorry about my appalling ignorance, but it has been a long time since

    > I've
    > > > used a wireless phone.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > --Scott
    > > > [email protected]
    > > > Cut the "tail" to send email.

    > >

    >
    >






  12. #12
    Michael Notforyou
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"


    "Joseph" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If you were incapacitated I'd think dialing random speed dials on
    > someone's cell phone I found with them would be the last thing that
    > I'd do. 911 is there for a reason and I'd use that.


    I agree, call 911. But when I've found a lost cell phone, the first thing
    I've done is look for a "Home" or "Office" phonebook entry and call it to
    find out to whom it belongs. It's a way to get a lost phone back, I think,
    more than anything else.

    *Michael Notforyou*





  13. #13
    Scott Nelson
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    That's what I was I was getting at.
    If I found someone hurt and couldn't talk, obviously I would call 911 but,
    after that's taken care of, I would try to get a hold of someone or relative
    and it would be easier if there were pre-programmed numbers in there
    somewhere.
    Not a big thing, just one of the many things to do when traveling by
    yourself and 'just in case' kind of deal.

    Scotty


    "Michael Notforyou" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Joseph" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > If you were incapacitated I'd think dialing random speed dials on
    > > someone's cell phone I found with them would be the last thing that
    > > I'd do. 911 is there for a reason and I'd use that.

    >
    > I agree, call 911. But when I've found a lost cell phone, the first thing
    > I've done is look for a "Home" or "Office" phonebook entry and call it to
    > find out to whom it belongs. It's a way to get a lost phone back, I think,
    > more than anything else.
    >
    > *Michael Notforyou*
    >
    >






  14. #14
    Freewheeling
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    "Also realize that even with analog back up there may be places where
    you have no service at all. It's nice to have, but don't absolutely
    count on a phone to save you."

    Well, that and Mr. 9mm.


    --
    --Scott
    "Joseph" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 24 Mar 2004 06:37:38 GMT, "Scott Nelson - Wash DC"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >If you get a phone, I would really recommend Verizon as they have more
    > >coverage and you won't have to worry about a GAIT phone or multi protocol
    > >phone. You want to be able to make a calls. Period.
    > >Your situation is different than the average person who pretty much stays

    in
    > >their area, more or less.

    >
    > If he's looking for an emergency phone that says prepaid. You
    > couldn't use a service like Pharos or CallPlus on those. You must use
    > a TDMA phone regardless of the superior coverage of Verizon which is a
    > CDMA provider.
    >
    > >With a travel charger, spare battery and emergency battery adapter kit

    that
    > >lets you use a 9 volt battery in an emergency, you will be traveling

    light
    > >and still get good service.

    >
    > And don't forget that some phones when the battery is entirely
    > depleted you cannot use by simply plugging in the car charger. You
    > should periodically check the condition and strength of your battery
    > and recharge as necessary. All batteries lose strength even when not
    > used. If you keep an emergency phone in the glove box you should
    > check it periodically to ensure that it will work when you need it to.
    > Also realize that even with analog back up there may be places where
    > you have no service at all. It's nice to have, but don't absolutely
    > count on a phone to save you.
    >
    > >It's also a good idea to pre-program the speed dials for all of your
    > >emergency contacts, in case something happens, any passer-by can just

    start
    > >dialing your pre-programmed numbers and not have to look very far.

    >
    > If you were incapacitated I'd think dialing random speed dials on
    > someone's cell phone I found with them would be the last thing that
    > I'd do. 911 is there for a reason and I'd use that. If there was
    > time before medical/police aid came I might attempt to go through the
    > phone book to see if there's someone who might need to know. I
    > wouldn't have any idea what speed dials were assigned.
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    > remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply






  15. #15
    Joseph
    Guest

    Re: Recommendations for "security phone?"

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2004 20:05:00 GMT, "Freewheeling"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >One question, does it matter whether the phone is for Cingular, Verizon or
    >Sprint? There are apparently all three available on ebay. Will all work
    >with pharos ?


    It must be a TDMA phone which rules out Verizon and Sprint. It cannot
    be a GSM phone as well. Ideally it should have originally been on the
    AT&T Wireless network.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply



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