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  1. #1
    John Navas
    Guest
    <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/3762844.stm>

    The fixed line phone in your home could soon be an endangered
    species.

    Research by handset maker Nokia shows that more and more people are
    using their mobile phone for every call they make or take.

    According to the study, more than 45 million people in the UK,
    Germany, US and South Korea now only use a mobile.

    It showed that people keep their fixed line phone because call
    charges are lower, but most of those questioned said the future was
    definitely mobile.

    ...

    In the US and Germany many of those interviewed said they used the
    fixed phone because it was more reliable than a mobile handset and
    let them get access to the net at relatively high speeds.

    In all the countries where interviews were carried out, older people
    were more likely to use a fixed line phone more than a mobile.

    Women aged 50 or above almost never use a mobile phone, the research
    found.

    ...

    Nokia said these findings had implications for mobile operators who
    must work hard to ensure that mobiles are seen as cheap, reliable and
    providing good call quality.

    The survey also showed that it is not just voice calls that are going
    wireless. Some of those questioned said they were looking to use a
    mobile or wireless service to get net access within the next couple
    of years.

    [MORE]

    --
    Best regards,
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/>



    See More: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future




  2. #2
    Cranky Dude
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    Not likely at this moment. I prefer voice quality good enough that I
    can understand what the person is saying. I can frequently tell when
    some is calling me from a cell phone. The voice warbles. There are
    drop-outs. I have to ask the person to repeat. When I make calls on
    my cell phone people are frequently asking me to repeat myself and I
    get dropped calls. Not only that but there are dead spots all over
    the city and when I'm out in the country I frequently have no service.

    The day a cell phone call has the quality of a land line is the day a
    land line will become an endangered species.

    I'm using ATTWS, Moto V60i (TDMA)

    CD




    On Tue, 02 Nov 2004 18:59:51 GMT, John Navas
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    ><http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/3762844.stm>
    >
    > The fixed line phone in your home could soon be an endangered
    > species.
    >
    > Research by handset maker Nokia shows that more and more people are
    > using their mobile phone for every call they make or take.
    >





  3. #3
    Dave C.
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future


    > I'm using ATTWS, Moto V60i (TDMA)
    >
    > CD
    >


    There's three mistakes. Try Cingular, Nokia (anything) and GSM Nation. In
    theory, ATTWS GSM is now the same as Cingular GSM. However, Cingular
    customers have always been able to roam more freely on ATT towers than the
    other way around, and Cingular seems to be taking their sweet time changing
    that. -Dave





  4. #4
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.attws - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Thu, 4 Nov 2004 13:48:07 -0500, "Dave
    C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> I'm using ATTWS, Moto V60i (TDMA)


    >There's three mistakes. Try Cingular, Nokia (anything) and GSM Nation. In
    >theory, ATTWS GSM is now the same as Cingular GSM. However, Cingular
    >customers have always been able to roam more freely on ATT towers than the
    >other way around, and Cingular seems to be taking their sweet time changing
    >that. -Dave


    For GSM it's actually the other way around: ATTWS GSM subscribers can now
    roam freely on Cingular, but still not vice versa (in many areas), giving
    ATTWS the best GSM coverage in the USA, better than TDMA coverage.

    As for the handset, not all Nokias are good, any more than any other brand,
    and there are equally good handsets from other brands. Regardless of brand,
    it's important to get a GSM handset that supports both the 850 and 1900 bands.
    My personal recommendation would be the Motorola V400.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>



  5. #5
    Cranky Dude
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    On Thu, 4 Nov 2004 13:48:07 -0500, "Dave C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >> I'm using ATTWS, Moto V60i (TDMA)
    >>
    >> CD
    >>

    >
    >There's three mistakes. Try Cingular, Nokia (anything) and GSM Nation.


    I had Cingular for two years before ATTWS. I have to admit that the
    quality of the calls was slightly better than ATTWS but not enough to
    get excited about. My Cingular service was also TDMA. On the other
    hand Cingular screwed me over with hidden charges and frequent sudden
    changes to the contract without prior notice. If I were to change
    providers I'd look at Verizon or T-Mobile before I considered Cingular
    again.

    ATTWS has given me a good deal pricewise. 650 minutes, unlimited
    nights/weekends, unlimited mobile to mobile calling for $29.95 /month
    so I'd probably stick with them. Is their GSM any better quality than
    their TDMA? Also, have they been putting up new towers? Last time I
    checked, their GSM coverage was not very good.

    CD





  6. #6
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.attws - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Thu, 04 Nov 2004 20:54:45
    GMT, Cranky Dude <[email protected]> wrote:

    >ATTWS has given me a good deal pricewise. 650 minutes, unlimited
    >nights/weekends, unlimited mobile to mobile calling for $29.95 /month
    >so I'd probably stick with them. Is their GSM any better quality than
    >their TDMA?


    Yes, particularly given the free roaming on Cingular.

    >Also, have they been putting up new towers?


    Yes.

    >Last time I
    >checked, their GSM coverage was not very good.


    It's improved greatly over the past year.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>



  7. #7
    Joseph
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 18:27:13 GMT, Cranky Dude
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Not likely at this moment. I prefer voice quality good enough that I
    >can understand what the person is saying. I can frequently tell when
    >some is calling me from a cell phone. The voice warbles. There are
    >drop-outs. I have to ask the person to repeat. When I make calls on
    >my cell phone people are frequently asking me to repeat myself and I
    >get dropped calls. Not only that but there are dead spots all over
    >the city and when I'm out in the country I frequently have no service.
    >
    >The day a cell phone call has the quality of a land line is the day a
    >land line will become an endangered species.
    >
    >I'm using ATTWS, Moto V60i (TDMA)


    Use ATTWS, cingular or T-Mobile GSM and it's a *world* of difference.
    Most people cannot tell that I am using a mobile when I call from
    inside a building (no street noise) with my GSM phone. GSM is a
    world of difference from TDMA (IS-136) and to most people's ears CDMA
    as well.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -




  8. #8
    USENET READER
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    I certainly hope that this trend means that the state public utility
    companies will start to regulate the cell phone service and markets
    instead of whoever else does it now. In North Carolina, the Attorney
    General handles cell phone issues like any old consumer affairs
    complaint and frankly there is damn little framework for handling it.

    Over in the Public Utilities Commission, they have a framework for
    handling complaints and the utilities don't get away with as much as
    cell phone companies do.

    Now while this won't allow the cell phone companies to introduce new
    rate plans every two weeks, it will at least allow people who all of a
    sudden get freakishly high bills due to roaming and other charges a
    chance to appeal the charges. Right now - most customers do not have
    that option.



    John Navas wrote:
    > <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/3762844.stm>
    >
    > The fixed line phone in your home could soon be an endangered
    > species.
    >
    > Research by handset maker Nokia shows that more and more people are
    > using their mobile phone for every call they make or take.
    >
    > According to the study, more than 45 million people in the UK,
    > Germany, US and South Korea now only use a mobile.
    >
    > It showed that people keep their fixed line phone because call
    > charges are lower, but most of those questioned said the future was
    > definitely mobile.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > In the US and Germany many of those interviewed said they used the
    > fixed phone because it was more reliable than a mobile handset and
    > let them get access to the net at relatively high speeds.
    >
    > In all the countries where interviews were carried out, older people
    > were more likely to use a fixed line phone more than a mobile.
    >
    > Women aged 50 or above almost never use a mobile phone, the research
    > found.
    >
    > ...
    >
    > Nokia said these findings had implications for mobile operators who
    > must work hard to ensure that mobiles are seen as cheap, reliable and
    > providing good call quality.
    >
    > The survey also showed that it is not just voice calls that are going
    > wireless. Some of those questioned said they were looking to use a
    > mobile or wireless service to get net access within the next couple
    > of years.
    >
    > [MORE]
    >




  9. #9
    USENET READER
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    It's not just voice quality.

    When we have had hurricanes and ice storms, we have never lost land-line
    phone service. Which means that we could always call the police, fire
    and ambulances if need be. And one time we were able to call to make a
    reservation in a motel when we had no power and the temps were going to
    be in the 20s at night.

    If we only had cell phone service, once we lost battery power in the
    cell phone, we would have been screwed. Also, the cell towers need
    power to function and they didn't have power after their generators ran
    out of fuel and the batteries died.

    I hope that the various states require - for emergency purposes more
    than anything else - that we maintain a healthy home and business land
    line phone system which would include payphones, so that in the event of
    an emergency, people can still use the phones to reach emergency and
    other needed services.



    Joseph wrote:

    > On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 18:27:13 GMT, Cranky Dude
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Not likely at this moment. I prefer voice quality good enough that I
    >>can understand what the person is saying. I can frequently tell when
    >>some is calling me from a cell phone. The voice warbles. There are
    >>drop-outs. I have to ask the person to repeat. When I make calls on
    >>my cell phone people are frequently asking me to repeat myself and I
    >>get dropped calls. Not only that but there are dead spots all over
    >>the city and when I'm out in the country I frequently have no service.
    >>
    >>The day a cell phone call has the quality of a land line is the day a
    >>land line will become an endangered species.
    >>
    >>I'm using ATTWS, Moto V60i (TDMA)

    >
    >
    > Use ATTWS, cingular or T-Mobile GSM and it's a *world* of difference.
    > Most people cannot tell that I am using a mobile when I call from
    > inside a building (no street noise) with my GSM phone. GSM is a
    > world of difference from TDMA (IS-136) and to most people's ears CDMA
    > as well.
    >
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    >




  10. #10
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    Most power failures are far shorter than the fuel supply duration of a
    cell tower generator. At some point the batteries and fuel supply at
    your local telco's central office would be exhausted too, meaning that
    the landlines would go dead. But I do share your concern that in an
    emergency cellular is less reliable than a wireline, and for that reason
    I will maintain my home wireline service for the foreseeable future.

    --
    John Richards


    "USENET READER" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It's not just voice quality.
    >
    > When we have had hurricanes and ice storms, we have never lost land-line phone service. Which means that we could always call
    > the police, fire and ambulances if need be. And one time we were able to call to make a reservation in a motel when we had no
    > power and the temps were going to be in the 20s at night.
    >
    > If we only had cell phone service, once we lost battery power in the cell phone, we would have been screwed. Also, the cell
    > towers need power to function and they didn't have power after their generators ran out of fuel and the batteries died.
    >
    > I hope that the various states require - for emergency purposes more than anything else - that we maintain a healthy home and
    > business land line phone system which would include payphones, so that in the event of an emergency, people can still use the
    > phones to reach emergency and other needed services.





  11. #11
    Jack Zwick
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "John Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Most power failures are far shorter than the fuel supply duration of a
    > cell tower generator. At some point the batteries and fuel supply at
    > your local telco's central office would be exhausted too, meaning that
    > the landlines would go dead. But I do share your concern that in an
    > emergency cellular is less reliable than a wireline, and for that reason
    > I will maintain my home wireline service for the foreseeable future.
    >
    > --
    > John Richards


    And if you want a reliable dsl broadband connection you need a local
    landline also. I got tired of weekly outages with Roadrunner.



  12. #12
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    There have been a number of notable cases where landlines went out, and
    cellular was the only phone service available.

    Satellite phone is arguably the highest level of reliability.

    In <[email protected]> on Mon, 08 Nov 2004
    21:08:07 GMT, "John Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Most power failures are far shorter than the fuel supply duration of a
    >cell tower generator. At some point the batteries and fuel supply at
    >your local telco's central office would be exhausted too, meaning that
    >the landlines would go dead. But I do share your concern that in an
    >emergency cellular is less reliable than a wireline, and for that reason
    >I will maintain my home wireline service for the foreseeable future.


    >"USENET READER" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> It's not just voice quality.
    >>
    >> When we have had hurricanes and ice storms, we have never lost land-line phone service. Which means that we could always call
    >> the police, fire and ambulances if need be. And one time we were able to call to make a reservation in a motel when we had no
    >> power and the temps were going to be in the 20s at night.
    >>
    >> If we only had cell phone service, once we lost battery power in the cell phone, we would have been screwed. Also, the cell
    >> towers need power to function and they didn't have power after their generators ran out of fuel and the batteries died.
    >>
    >> I hope that the various states require - for emergency purposes more than anything else - that we maintain a healthy home and
    >> business land line phone system which would include payphones, so that in the event of an emergency, people can still use the
    >> phones to reach emergency and other needed services.


    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>



  13. #13
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.attws - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Mon, 08 Nov 2004
    19:54:00 GMT, USENET READER <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Now while this won't allow the cell phone companies to introduce new
    >rate plans every two weeks, it will at least allow people who all of a
    >sudden get freakishly high bills due to roaming and other charges a
    >chance to appeal the charges. Right now - most customers do not have
    >that option.


    Option: Small Claims Court.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>



  14. #14
    Jud Hardcastle
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    In article <[email protected]>, spamfilter0
    @navasgroup.com says...
    > There have been a number of notable cases where landlines went out, and
    > cellular was the only phone service available.
    >
    > Satellite phone is arguably the highest level of reliability.
    >


    You gotta be joking. Everything I've ever read from someone that
    actually USED a satellite phone was that it was extrememly picky--had to
    be totally clear skys with no trees or anything and then they had to
    walk around to get the best antenna angle. Most STORMS include heavy
    rain and/or hail--the sat phone will get squat during that.
    --
    Jud
    Dallas TX USA



  15. #15
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Home phones face uncertain future

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.attws - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Mon, 08 Nov 2004
    23:54:01 GMT, Jud Hardcastle <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, spamfilter0
    >@navasgroup.com says...


    >> Satellite phone is arguably the highest level of reliability.

    >
    >You gotta be joking. Everything I've ever read from someone that
    >actually USED a satellite phone was that it was extrememly picky--had to
    >be totally clear skys with no trees or anything and then they had to
    >walk around to get the best antenna angle. Most STORMS include heavy
    >rain and/or hail--the sat phone will get squat during that.


    Inmarsat has excellent all-weather reliability, which is why it has become the
    standard for marine communication. Iridium is quite good too, especially
    given a current model handset. Both of course need an unobstructed view of
    the sky. I've used both, and given an unobstructed view of the sky, have
    never had to walk around, worry about antenna angle, or have a problem in a
    storm.

    --
    Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
    John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular>



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