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  1. #31
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    "DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > In message <%[email protected]> "John
    > Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>"wkearney99" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >>>> So if a friend or family member in trouble calls from a pay phone or from
    >>>> a borrowed phone, they're just in deep sh*t, right? Too bad for them.
    >>>
    >>> Indeed, and perhaps better for you not getting stuck bailing out some nitwit
    >>> in the middle of the night.

    >>
    >>You might live to regret that decision if the person in trouble turned out
    >>to be your daughter or girlfriend.

    >
    > Perhaps, perhaps not. Chances are it wouldn't hurt anything if you let
    > the call go to voicemail and check the message.
    >
    > You'd still drive down to the police station and bail 'em out.


    Lot of good that would do after the person had been mugged or r a p e d
    when their car stalled in a bad neighborhood.

    --
    John Richards



    See More: Who's Got Your Number?




  2. #32
    DevilsPGD
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    In message <[email protected]> "John
    Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >> In message <%[email protected]> "John
    >> Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>"wkearney99" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >>>>> So if a friend or family member in trouble calls from a pay phone or from
    >>>>> a borrowed phone, they're just in deep sh*t, right? Too bad for them.
    >>>>
    >>>> Indeed, and perhaps better for you not getting stuck bailing out some nitwit
    >>>> in the middle of the night.
    >>>
    >>>You might live to regret that decision if the person in trouble turned out
    >>>to be your daughter or girlfriend.

    >>
    >> Perhaps, perhaps not. Chances are it wouldn't hurt anything if you let
    >> the call go to voicemail and check the message.
    >>
    >> You'd still drive down to the police station and bail 'em out.

    >
    >Lot of good that would do after the person had been mugged or r a p e d
    >when their car stalled in a bad neighborhood.


    I wouldn't recommend calling me in that situation, I'd call AMA. Either
    way, I'd still listen to the voicemail and do the same thing I would do
    if I actually talked to the person (which in this case, would be to call
    a tow truck)


    --
    The preceding post may have contained foul language,
    and should not have been read by young children.



  3. #33
    DevilsPGD
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    In message <[email protected]> Joseph
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 15:57:15 -0600, DevilsPGD <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>In message <[email protected]> "John
    >>Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>"DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >>>> In message <%[email protected]> "John
    >>>> Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>"wkearney99" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >>>>>>> So if a friend or family member in trouble calls from a pay phone or from
    >>>>>>> a borrowed phone, they're just in deep sh*t, right? Too bad for them.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Indeed, and perhaps better for you not getting stuck bailing out some nitwit
    >>>>>> in the middle of the night.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>You might live to regret that decision if the person in trouble turned out
    >>>>>to be your daughter or girlfriend.
    >>>>
    >>>> Perhaps, perhaps not. Chances are it wouldn't hurt anything if you let
    >>>> the call go to voicemail and check the message.
    >>>>
    >>>> You'd still drive down to the police station and bail 'em out.
    >>>
    >>>Lot of good that would do after the person had been mugged or r a p e d
    >>>when their car stalled in a bad neighborhood.

    >>
    >>I wouldn't recommend calling me in that situation, I'd call AMA. Either
    >>way, I'd still listen to the voicemail and do the same thing I would do
    >>if I actually talked to the person (which in this case, would be to call
    >>a tow truck)

    >
    >I see. You constantly check your voicemail every 10 seconds. That
    >makes sense if that's the case. If that's not the case then evidently
    >you don't think an emergency situation calls for better then that, eh?
    >Let's hope someone you care about isn't in a dire situation that
    >requires immediate action. If it was someone you cared about you'd
    >likely sing a different tune.


    Not much checking is required, I simply set my phone to beep and/or
    vibrate (depending on which profile is active) when I receive a
    voicemail.

    Even when I have my phone set to unknown callers (numbers not in my
    phonebook) straight to voicemail, I still have my phone alert me if I
    receive a voicemail.


    --
    A gun isn't a weapon; it's a tool. Like a harpoon, or a hammer or an
    alligator. You just need more education on this subject.
    -- Homer Simpson



  4. #34
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    John Richards wrote:
    > "DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> In message <%[email protected]> "John
    >> Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "wkearney99" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>>> So if a friend or family member in trouble calls from a pay phone
    >>>>> or from
    >>>>> a borrowed phone, they're just in deep sh*t, right? Too bad for them.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Indeed, and perhaps better for you not getting stuck bailing out
    >>>> some nitwit
    >>>> in the middle of the night.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> You might live to regret that decision if the person in trouble
    >>> turned out
    >>> to be your daughter or girlfriend.

    >>
    >>
    >> Perhaps, perhaps not. Chances are it wouldn't hurt anything if you let
    >> the call go to voicemail and check the message.
    >>
    >> You'd still drive down to the police station and bail 'em out.

    >
    >
    > Lot of good that would do after the person had been mugged or r a p e d
    > when their car stalled in a bad neighborhood.
    >



    So, John, you're saying that if someone desperately tries to call me for
    the purpose of soliciting my assistance, they get my vmail AND leave a
    message, but if I don't madly dash in to hear it, thereby learning of
    someone's dire circumstance and then madly dash out to retrieve them,
    but they get mugged due to my not answering my phone from unknown
    callers, their mugging is MY fault?

    I can see your Blame Transferance Mode is a bit too active.

    What if I had been in the shower? am I now expected to refrain from
    taking a shower in case someone can't remember to dial 911 or Road King?
    Am I expected to be 911 or Road King for my entire family? how about
    the entire neighbourhood? How deep into the World of What-ifs does this
    guilt trip of yours go? What if I had been doing a dozen other things
    that take me away from the phone for a few minutes on a regular basis?
    Am I now expected to drag around a phone even when I got to the ****ter?
    crawl up to the attic? take out the trash? check my mail? run next
    door for a cup of sugar? run across the street for more sugar? lest I
    miss out on someone else's dire circumstance?

    But, by golly, if someone calls me and leaves a message, that five
    minute delay of a callback causes me a lifetime of guilt because I
    didn't answer the phone the FIRST time, yessir, it's all my fault.


    I went down to the Clue Store the other day John, and I got something
    just for you - Just because a phone rings does not bestow upon it the
    constitutional right to be answered.


    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  5. #35
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    "Jer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > John Richards wrote:
    >> "DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>> In message <%[email protected]> "John
    >>> Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "wkearney99" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>
    >>>>>> So if a friend or family member in trouble calls from a pay phone
    >>>>>> or from
    >>>>>> a borrowed phone, they're just in deep sh*t, right? Too bad for them.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Indeed, and perhaps better for you not getting stuck bailing out
    >>>>> some nitwit
    >>>>> in the middle of the night.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> You might live to regret that decision if the person in trouble
    >>>> turned out
    >>>> to be your daughter or girlfriend.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Perhaps, perhaps not. Chances are it wouldn't hurt anything if you let
    >>> the call go to voicemail and check the message.
    >>>
    >>> You'd still drive down to the police station and bail 'em out.

    >>
    >>
    >> Lot of good that would do after the person had been mugged or r a p e d
    >> when their car stalled in a bad neighborhood.
    >>

    >
    >
    > So, John, you're saying that if someone desperately tries to call me for
    > the purpose of soliciting my assistance, they get my vmail AND leave a
    > message, but if I don't madly dash in to hear it, thereby learning of
    > someone's dire circumstance and then madly dash out to retrieve them,
    > but they get mugged due to my not answering my phone from unknown
    > callers, their mugging is MY fault?


    I never said ANYTHING about fault.
    You're raising a red herring.

    > I can see your Blame Transferance Mode is a bit too active.
    >
    > What if I had been in the shower? am I now expected to refrain from
    > taking a shower in case someone can't remember to dial 911 or Road King?
    > Am I expected to be 911 or Road King for my entire family? how about
    > the entire neighbourhood? How deep into the World of What-ifs does this
    > guilt trip of yours go? What if I had been doing a dozen other things
    > that take me away from the phone for a few minutes on a regular basis?
    > Am I now expected to drag around a phone even when I got to the ****ter?
    > crawl up to the attic? take out the trash? check my mail? run next
    > door for a cup of sugar? run across the street for more sugar? lest I
    > miss out on someone else's dire circumstance?
    >
    > But, by golly, if someone calls me and leaves a message, that five
    > minute delay of a callback causes me a lifetime of guilt because I
    > didn't answer the phone the FIRST time, yessir, it's all my fault.


    Again, the phony "fault" thing. (No pun intended)
    No person can be expected to be available 24/7.
    All I'm saying is that it is my habit to answer calls if I'm available,
    regardless of whether I recognize the number or not. Why? Because
    both my wife and daughter have called me from borrowed or pay phones
    with urgent questions or requests for assistance. If you're comfortable
    with not answering that type of call, that's your business.

    --
    John Richards



  6. #36
    teleguy
    teleguy is offline
    Sr. Member

    Posts
    204 - liked 2 times

    So, all of you "privacy" folks: if your wife/husband/parent/daughter/son is in a accident and cannot give your number to anyone, they just won't be able to contact you. Some plan. Better think it thru.



  7. #37
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    John Richards wrote:
    > "Jer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> John Richards wrote:
    >>
    >>> "DevilsPGD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>> In message <%[email protected]> "John
    >>>> Richards" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "wkearney99" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> So if a friend or family member in trouble calls from a pay phone
    >>>>>>> or from
    >>>>>>> a borrowed phone, they're just in deep sh*t, right? Too bad for
    >>>>>>> them.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Indeed, and perhaps better for you not getting stuck bailing out
    >>>>>> some nitwit
    >>>>>> in the middle of the night.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> You might live to regret that decision if the person in trouble
    >>>>> turned out
    >>>>> to be your daughter or girlfriend.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Perhaps, perhaps not. Chances are it wouldn't hurt anything if you let
    >>>> the call go to voicemail and check the message.
    >>>>
    >>>> You'd still drive down to the police station and bail 'em out.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Lot of good that would do after the person had been mugged or r a p e d
    >>> when their car stalled in a bad neighborhood.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> So, John, you're saying that if someone desperately tries to call me
    >> for the purpose of soliciting my assistance, they get my vmail AND
    >> leave a message, but if I don't madly dash in to hear it, thereby
    >> learning of someone's dire circumstance and then madly dash out to
    >> retrieve them, but they get mugged due to my not answering my phone
    >> from unknown callers, their mugging is MY fault?

    >
    >
    > I never said ANYTHING about fault.
    > You're raising a red herring.


    Red herring? Hardly. You didn't have to say it in words, John, but you
    did by implication - and in my book it's the same thing.


    >
    >> I can see your Blame Transferance Mode is a bit too active.
    >>
    >> What if I had been in the shower? am I now expected to refrain from
    >> taking a shower in case someone can't remember to dial 911 or Road
    >> King? Am I expected to be 911 or Road King for my entire family? how
    >> about the entire neighbourhood? How deep into the World of What-ifs
    >> does this guilt trip of yours go? What if I had been doing a dozen
    >> other things that take me away from the phone for a few minutes on a
    >> regular basis? Am I now expected to drag around a phone even when I
    >> got to the ****ter? crawl up to the attic? take out the trash?
    >> check my mail? run next door for a cup of sugar? run across the
    >> street for more sugar? lest I miss out on someone else's dire
    >> circumstance?
    >>
    >> But, by golly, if someone calls me and leaves a message, that five
    >> minute delay of a callback causes me a lifetime of guilt because I
    >> didn't answer the phone the FIRST time, yessir, it's all my fault.

    >
    >
    > Again, the phony "fault" thing. (No pun intended)
    > No person can be expected to be available 24/7.
    > All I'm saying is that it is my habit to answer calls if I'm available,
    > regardless of whether I recognize the number or not. Why? Because
    > both my wife and daughter have called me from borrowed or pay phones
    > with urgent questions or requests for assistance. If you're comfortable
    > with not answering that type of call, that's your business.



    You're absolutely right it is my business. Tell us, John... what is
    your habit for dealing with urgent calls when you're not available?
    What does your Guilt Guide say?

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



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