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  1. #1
    MrPepper11
    Guest
    March 21, 2005
    Who's Got Your Number?
    This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    isn't looking so good.
    By JESSE DRUCKER
    Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

    Getting in touch should be easier than ever these days.

    National telephone directories mean you can call 411 and get business
    and home numbers from across the street or across the country. Finding
    someone's e-mail address often just requires typing their name and the
    word "email" into Google.

    But just try finding a person's cellphone number. There is no
    centralized wireless directory in the U.S. To a majority of U.S.
    cellphone customers, this is a good thing. They don't want to be found.
    But for the millions of others who rely solely on their cellphones, and
    who want their own numbers and those of others to be listed, the lack
    of a directory is a hassle.

    A few months ago, it seemed the void was about to be filled. A group
    hired by the cellphone industry's main trade association said 2005
    would finally be the year cellphone numbers become available in a
    national wireless directory.

    But now the directory is in trouble, with the biggest carriers
    expressing reservations and only two that are still committed to
    building a directory of their customers' numbers.

    What went wrong? Two surveys have suggested that a majority of
    cellphone customers don't want their numbers listed. And Verizon
    Wireless, the country's No. 2 provider with nearly 44 million
    subscribers, has lobbied vocally against the plan, complaining both
    that such a directory could lead to an increase in state regulations,
    and that its customers fear their privacy would be threatened.
    Chicago-based U.S. Cellular Corp. also opposes the plan.

    Meanwhile, Cingular Wireless, Sprint Corp. and Alltel Corp. -- who
    serve a combined roughly 80 million customers -- say they support a
    directory in theory. But they say they are not planning to make their
    customers' numbers available in such a directory this year.

    In some cases, these carriers say they have been spooked by bad
    publicity, some of which resulted from testimony before Congress last
    September by Verizon Wireless officials and others. Appearing before a
    committee considering regulation for a national wireless directory,
    Verizon Wireless CEO Denny Strigl said that such a directory could
    violate customers' privacy.

    Some of the reluctant carriers also fear the spread of regulations in
    the wake of a law passed in California late last year requiring that
    customers' signatures be obtained before their numbers can be put in a
    directory.

    "We're going to continue to explore it for the longer term," says a
    spokeswoman for Cingular, the country's biggest carrier, with 49
    million subscribers. The company is an Atlanta-based joint venture of
    SBC Communications Inc. and BellSouth Corp.

    A spokesman for Alltel, of Little Rock, Ark., which has more than eight
    million subscribers, says it has stopped actively participating in the
    efforts pending the outcome of legislative and regulatory issues.

    Two other carriers are sticking with the original plan and hope to
    offer a service by the end of this year. Nextel Communications Inc. and
    T-Mobile USA Inc. say they have started compiling numbers of their
    customers, who together total about 32 million. T-Mobile, a unit of
    Germany's Deutsche Telekom AG, says it aims to launch the offering
    during the fourth quarter. Nextel says it's a "strong possibility" it
    will be available by the end of 2005.

    "Our customers have been asking us for it," says a Nextel spokeswoman.
    She notes that the carrier's subscribers are largely business
    customers, who tend to want their services listed. In December, Nextel
    agreed to be acquired by Sprint.

    Meanwhile, officials from Qsent Inc., the Portland, Ore., company hired
    by cellular carriers to assemble a national directory before the chill
    set in, say they are continuing their preparations. They predict that
    the privacy concerns will fade once cellphone customers start using the
    service and see the benefits. "We call it wireless 411, but the reality
    is: It's just 411," says Greg Keene, Qsent's chief privacy officer.
    "Consumers call 411 looking either for a person or a business. If those
    people or businesses are now in 411...that's a benefit to the
    consumer."

    While some say the last thing wireless customers want now is a way for
    telemarketers to infiltrate what they view as a last refuge of
    telecommunications privacy, Mr. Keene says those fears are misplaced.
    He says that the directory will include only numbers of people who opt
    in, and that their numbers will not be shared with marketers. Federal
    law prohibits telemarketing calls to cellphones, since the customers
    have to pay for the call.

    Some alternatives exist for cellphone customers who want to list their
    numbers. Telephone companies like Verizon Communications Inc. --
    majority owner of Verizon Wireless -- will list your cellular number in
    their regular directories.

    But it'll cost you: Verizon's current service requires customers to pay
    an initial sign-up fee to list cellphone numbers or other "foreign"
    listings, as it calls them, like 800 numbers or non-Verizon numbers.
    Verizon's sign-up fees range from $12.32 in Rhode Island to $35.90 in
    New York. There is a monthly fee as well, ranging from $1.05 in New
    Jersey and Maryland to $3.05 in Rhode Island.

    But Verizon Wireless says there isn't enough demand to justify setting
    up a wireless directory. In addition to the company's other objections,
    "we just don't see enough of a demand for this service to put the
    resources behind it to pursue it with the privacy safeguards we need,"
    says Verizon Wireless spokesman Jim Gerace. "The industry doesn't need
    to be pursuing this when it ought to be putting resources into
    improving service."

    In one of the surveys, about a quarter of cellphone users said they
    would like a directory if it were operated under the conditions
    proposed by Qsent: Listed cellphone numbers would not appear in a
    printed directory and would not be sold.

    In addition, proposed federal legislation would ban carriers from
    including numbers unless consumers opt in. Organizations like the
    Consumers Union and the AARP say that guarantees of such protections
    shouldn't depend merely on the voluntary pledges of the carriers.
    Codifying protections in legislation "shouldn't be such a big deal,"
    says Janee Briesemeister, a senior policy analyst with Consumers Union,
    and the campaign manager for EscapeCellHell.org, a Web site for
    consumers.

    Although the federal effort to regulate wireless directories has
    stalled, several states are moving on their own. In addition to the
    restrictions implemented in California, Connecticut Attorney General
    Richard Blumenthal has sent letters to several major cellular carriers
    seeking to prevent the creation of a wireless directory.




    See More: Who's Got Your Number?




  2. #2
    Notan
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    MrPepper11 wrote:
    >
    > March 21, 2005
    > Who's Got Your Number?
    > This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    > isn't looking so good.
    > By JESSE DRUCKER
    > Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    >
    > <snip>


    I've never met a person who *wanted* their cell phone number listed.

    Notan



  3. #3
    RJ
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    Thats the whole point - most of the people that I know if not all DON'T
    want their mobile listed. Thats the reason that most of us sut the cord to
    begin with. I dread the day of a wireless directory and then the
    telemarketing calls that will follow

    RJ




    "MrPepper11" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > March 21, 2005
    > Who's Got Your Number?
    > This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    > isn't looking so good.
    > By JESSE DRUCKER
    > Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    >
    > Getting in touch should be easier than ever these days.
    >
    > National telephone directories mean you can call 411 and get business
    > and home numbers from across the street or across the country. Finding
    > someone's e-mail address often just requires typing their name and the
    > word "email" into Google.
    >
    > But just try finding a person's cellphone number. There is no
    > centralized wireless directory in the U.S. To a majority of U.S.
    > cellphone customers, this is a good thing. They don't want to be found.
    > But for the millions of others who rely solely on their cellphones, and
    > who want their own numbers and those of others to be listed, the lack
    > of a directory is a hassle.
    >
    > A few months ago, it seemed the void was about to be filled. A group
    > hired by the cellphone industry's main trade association said 2005
    > would finally be the year cellphone numbers become available in a
    > national wireless directory.
    >
    > But now the directory is in trouble, with the biggest carriers
    > expressing reservations and only two that are still committed to
    > building a directory of their customers' numbers.
    >
    > What went wrong? Two surveys have suggested that a majority of
    > cellphone customers don't want their numbers listed. And Verizon
    > Wireless, the country's No. 2 provider with nearly 44 million
    > subscribers, has lobbied vocally against the plan, complaining both
    > that such a directory could lead to an increase in state regulations,
    > and that its customers fear their privacy would be threatened.
    > Chicago-based U.S. Cellular Corp. also opposes the plan.
    >
    > Meanwhile, Cingular Wireless, Sprint Corp. and Alltel Corp. -- who
    > serve a combined roughly 80 million customers -- say they support a
    > directory in theory. But they say they are not planning to make their
    > customers' numbers available in such a directory this year.
    >
    > In some cases, these carriers say they have been spooked by bad
    > publicity, some of which resulted from testimony before Congress last
    > September by Verizon Wireless officials and others. Appearing before a
    > committee considering regulation for a national wireless directory,
    > Verizon Wireless CEO Denny Strigl said that such a directory could
    > violate customers' privacy.
    >
    > Some of the reluctant carriers also fear the spread of regulations in
    > the wake of a law passed in California late last year requiring that
    > customers' signatures be obtained before their numbers can be put in a
    > directory.
    >
    > "We're going to continue to explore it for the longer term," says a
    > spokeswoman for Cingular, the country's biggest carrier, with 49
    > million subscribers. The company is an Atlanta-based joint venture of
    > SBC Communications Inc. and BellSouth Corp.
    >
    > A spokesman for Alltel, of Little Rock, Ark., which has more than eight
    > million subscribers, says it has stopped actively participating in the
    > efforts pending the outcome of legislative and regulatory issues.
    >
    > Two other carriers are sticking with the original plan and hope to
    > offer a service by the end of this year. Nextel Communications Inc. and
    > T-Mobile USA Inc. say they have started compiling numbers of their
    > customers, who together total about 32 million. T-Mobile, a unit of
    > Germany's Deutsche Telekom AG, says it aims to launch the offering
    > during the fourth quarter. Nextel says it's a "strong possibility" it
    > will be available by the end of 2005.
    >
    > "Our customers have been asking us for it," says a Nextel spokeswoman.
    > She notes that the carrier's subscribers are largely business
    > customers, who tend to want their services listed. In December, Nextel
    > agreed to be acquired by Sprint.
    >
    > Meanwhile, officials from Qsent Inc., the Portland, Ore., company hired
    > by cellular carriers to assemble a national directory before the chill
    > set in, say they are continuing their preparations. They predict that
    > the privacy concerns will fade once cellphone customers start using the
    > service and see the benefits. "We call it wireless 411, but the reality
    > is: It's just 411," says Greg Keene, Qsent's chief privacy officer.
    > "Consumers call 411 looking either for a person or a business. If those
    > people or businesses are now in 411...that's a benefit to the
    > consumer."
    >
    > While some say the last thing wireless customers want now is a way for
    > telemarketers to infiltrate what they view as a last refuge of
    > telecommunications privacy, Mr. Keene says those fears are misplaced.
    > He says that the directory will include only numbers of people who opt
    > in, and that their numbers will not be shared with marketers. Federal
    > law prohibits telemarketing calls to cellphones, since the customers
    > have to pay for the call.
    >
    > Some alternatives exist for cellphone customers who want to list their
    > numbers. Telephone companies like Verizon Communications Inc. --
    > majority owner of Verizon Wireless -- will list your cellular number in
    > their regular directories.
    >
    > But it'll cost you: Verizon's current service requires customers to pay
    > an initial sign-up fee to list cellphone numbers or other "foreign"
    > listings, as it calls them, like 800 numbers or non-Verizon numbers.
    > Verizon's sign-up fees range from $12.32 in Rhode Island to $35.90 in
    > New York. There is a monthly fee as well, ranging from $1.05 in New
    > Jersey and Maryland to $3.05 in Rhode Island.
    >
    > But Verizon Wireless says there isn't enough demand to justify setting
    > up a wireless directory. In addition to the company's other objections,
    > "we just don't see enough of a demand for this service to put the
    > resources behind it to pursue it with the privacy safeguards we need,"
    > says Verizon Wireless spokesman Jim Gerace. "The industry doesn't need
    > to be pursuing this when it ought to be putting resources into
    > improving service."
    >
    > In one of the surveys, about a quarter of cellphone users said they
    > would like a directory if it were operated under the conditions
    > proposed by Qsent: Listed cellphone numbers would not appear in a
    > printed directory and would not be sold.
    >
    > In addition, proposed federal legislation would ban carriers from
    > including numbers unless consumers opt in. Organizations like the
    > Consumers Union and the AARP say that guarantees of such protections
    > shouldn't depend merely on the voluntary pledges of the carriers.
    > Codifying protections in legislation "shouldn't be such a big deal,"
    > says Janee Briesemeister, a senior policy analyst with Consumers Union,
    > and the campaign manager for EscapeCellHell.org, a Web site for
    > consumers.
    >
    > Although the federal effort to regulate wireless directories has
    > stalled, several states are moving on their own. In addition to the
    > restrictions implemented in California, Connecticut Attorney General
    > Richard Blumenthal has sent letters to several major cellular carriers
    > seeking to prevent the creation of a wireless directory.
    >






  4. #4
    Notan
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    Brian Gordon wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, Notan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >MrPepper11 wrote:
    > >>
    > >> March 21, 2005
    > >> Who's Got Your Number?
    > >> This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    > >> isn't looking so good.
    > >> By JESSE DRUCKER
    > >> Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    > >>
    > >> <snip>

    > >
    > >I've never met a person who *wanted* their cell phone number listed.
    > >
    > >Notan

    >
    > You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no landline
    > at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find them.


    The people that I associate with, only give their cell phone numbers
    to people that they want to have them.

    Among other things, it keeps them from getting unsolicited sales calls,
    etc.

    Notan



  5. #5
    Brian Gordon
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    In article <[email protected]>, Notan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >MrPepper11 wrote:
    >>
    >> March 21, 2005
    >> Who's Got Your Number?
    >> This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    >> isn't looking so good.
    >> By JESSE DRUCKER
    >> Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    >>
    >> <snip>

    >
    >I've never met a person who *wanted* their cell phone number listed.
    >
    >Notan


    You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no landline
    at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find them.

    --
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    | Brian Gordon -->[email protected]<-- brian.gordon at cox dot net |
    + Bass: "Spirit of Phoenix" SPEBSQSA Chorus (and Gotcha! dad) +
    -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-



  6. #6
    Porter Haskew
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    On Sat, 2 Apr 2005 21:06:52 -0500, [email protected] wrote:
    >*In article <[email protected]>, Notan
    >*<[email protected]>*wrote:
    >
    >>*MrPepper11 wrote:
    >>
    >>>*March 21, 2005
    >>>*Who's Got Your Number?
    >>>*This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless
    >>>*directory. It isn't looking so good. By JESSE DRUCKER Staff
    >>>*Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    >>>
    >>>*<snip>
    >>>

    >>*I've never met a person who *wanted* their cell phone number
    >>*listed.
    >>
    >>*Notan
    >>

    >*You must not have many cellphone only friends. *I have several with
    >*no landline at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number,
    >*you just can't find them.


    I have not had a landline for over two years now. The people I want to findme have my number because I gave it to them. I do not want my numberpublished. That would mean sales calls every few minutes.




  7. #7
    Brian Gordon
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Todd Copeland <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Brian Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no

    >landline
    >> at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find

    >them.
    >
    >Of course, if you knew them well enough to call them friends you could
    >simply ask for their phone number.
    >
    >


    I plan to -- as soon as our paths cross again. They are ~50 miles away and we
    don't see each other that often.

    --
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    | Brian Gordon -->[email protected]<-- brian.gordon at cox dot net |
    + Bass: "Spirit of Phoenix" SPEBSQSA Chorus (and Gotcha! dad) +
    -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-



  8. #8
    Todd Copeland
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    "Brian Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no

    landline
    > at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find

    them.

    Of course, if you knew them well enough to call them friends you could
    simply ask for their phone number.





  9. #9
    Bob Ward
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 02:06:52 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Brian
    Gordon) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Notan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>MrPepper11 wrote:
    >>>
    >>> March 21, 2005
    >>> Who's Got Your Number?
    >>> This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    >>> isn't looking so good.
    >>> By JESSE DRUCKER
    >>> Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    >>>
    >>> <snip>

    >>
    >>I've never met a person who *wanted* their cell phone number listed.
    >>
    >>Notan

    >
    >You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no landline
    >at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find them.



    That's probably why they are cellphone only. If you were really their
    friend, you'd get the number.



  10. #10
    Scooterflex
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    I don't have a land line and I would not want my cell phone number published
    anywhere. I pay for minutes and I don't want to be bothered with useless
    telemarketing phone calls to my cell phone. Who would want their cell number
    published? Not me!

    "Brian Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Notan <[email protected]>

    wrote:
    > >MrPepper11 wrote:
    > >>
    > >> March 21, 2005
    > >> Who's Got Your Number?
    > >> This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    > >> isn't looking so good.
    > >> By JESSE DRUCKER
    > >> Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    > >>
    > >> <snip>

    > >
    > >I've never met a person who *wanted* their cell phone number listed.
    > >
    > >Notan

    >
    > You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no

    landline
    > at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find

    them.
    >
    > --
    >

    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-
    +-+
    > | Brian Gordon -->[email protected]<-- brian.gordon at cox dot

    net |
    > + Bass: "Spirit of Phoenix" SPEBSQSA Chorus (and Gotcha! dad)

    +
    > -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

    -+-+-






  11. #11
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    Brian Gordon wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Todd Copeland <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>"Brian Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no

    >>
    >>landline
    >>
    >>>at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find

    >>
    >>them.
    >>
    >>Of course, if you knew them well enough to call them friends you could
    >>simply ask for their phone number.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > I plan to -- as soon as our paths cross again. They are ~50 miles away and we
    > don't see each other that often.
    >



    What? They didn't leave their new number on a referral recording?

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  12. #12
    Jack Zwick
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Joseph <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 02:06:52 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Brian
    > Gordon) wrote:
    >
    > >You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no
    > >landline
    > >at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find
    > >them.

    >
    > Cellphone subscribers *inform* those who they want to have their
    > number. Furthermore why should I pay for people to call me that I
    > don't care to hear from?


    Most all cell phones now have Caller ID. Dont answer if you dont know
    who it is, or dont want to talk to someone.



  13. #13
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    "Brian Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Notan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>MrPepper11 wrote:
    >>>
    >>> March 21, 2005
    >>> Who's Got Your Number?
    >>> This was supposed to be the year for a national wireless directory. It
    >>> isn't looking so good.
    >>> By JESSE DRUCKER
    >>> Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    >>>
    >>> <snip>

    >>
    >>I've never met a person who *wanted* their cell phone number listed.
    >>
    >>Notan

    >
    > You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no landline
    > at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find them.


    People who want you to have their cellphone number will give it to you.
    Or you can always ask for it via snail mail or personal visit.
    It's certainly no reason to violate someone's privacy by listing their
    number against their wishes.

    --
    John Richards



  14. #14
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    "Brian Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Todd Copeland <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>"Brian Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]
    >>> You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no

    >>landline
    >>> at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find

    >>them.
    >>
    >>Of course, if you knew them well enough to call them friends you could
    >>simply ask for their phone number.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I plan to -- as soon as our paths cross again. They are ~50 miles away and we
    > don't see each other that often.


    You've heard of email and snail mail?

    --
    John Richards



  15. #15
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Who's Got Your Number?

    "Jack Zwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Joseph <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 02:06:52 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Brian
    >> Gordon) wrote:
    >>
    >> >You must not have many cellphone only friends. I have several with no
    >> >landline
    >> >at all, so if you can't find their cellphone number, you just can't find
    >> >them.

    >>
    >> Cellphone subscribers *inform* those who they want to have their
    >> number. Furthermore why should I pay for people to call me that I
    >> don't care to hear from?

    >
    > Most all cell phones now have Caller ID. Dont answer if you dont know
    > who it is, or dont want to talk to someone.


    So if a friend or family member in trouble calls from a pay phone or from
    a borrowed phone, they're just in deep sh*t, right? Too bad for them.

    --
    John Richards



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