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  1. #1
    Donkey Agony
    Guest
    Going to Europe for almost a month (May - June). Sprint has this new
    Samsung "International Phone" available, the IP-A790. The Sprint
    International Roaming office is closed weekends (I'll call them Monday
    or Tuesday), and the web site is not all that helpful, but it *looks*
    like all calls used in the countries I'm going to in Europe are $1.50 a
    minute, including long distance. I assume that's on top of my normal
    service plan.

    First of all, has anyone here used that phone with Sprint service in
    Europe? I'd love to hear what you think.

    I'm wondering if you can take the Sprint SIM out and put an el-cheapo
    Euro SIM in it. That way, I could *place* calls using the cheap SIM,
    but still receive calls on my normal U.S. number when I have the Sprint
    SIM in it. That might be a viable option.

    Other than that, what are my best options (pricewise and servicewise)
    for

    a) using a GSM phone over 3 or 4 countries to place and receive calls
    within Europe
    b) ditto, but from Europe to the U.S.
    c) ditto, but the U.S. to Europe (i.e., having it possible for people to
    reach me)

    I have an old Bosch/Siemens GSM world phone (from back in the Sprint
    Spectrum days, around '97 or so) that might do the job, or I might even
    just pick up a new and more modern GSM phone.

    But I'd love some advise on the logistics of this.

    Many thanks in advance,

    --
    da
    ~~
    "OE Quotefix"
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
    to fix Outlook Express' broken quoting.





    See More: SprintPCS in Europe?




  2. #2
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    Crossposted to Verizon newsgroup, for reasons that will be made clear in a moment.

    Donkey Agony wrote:
    > Going to Europe for almost a month (May - June). Sprint has this new
    > Samsung "International Phone" available, the IP-A790. The Sprint
    > International Roaming office is closed weekends (I'll call them Monday
    > or Tuesday), and the web site is not all that helpful, but it *looks*
    > like all calls used in the countries I'm going to in Europe are $1.50 a
    > minute, including long distance. I assume that's on top of my normal
    > service plan.
    >
    > First of all, has anyone here used that phone with Sprint service in
    > Europe? I'd love to hear what you think.


    It's not Sprint service. Note the word "Roaming" in the phrase "International
    Roaming office."

    > I'm wondering if you can take the Sprint SIM out and put an el-cheapo
    > Euro SIM in it. That way, I could *place* calls using the cheap SIM,
    > but still receive calls on my normal U.S. number when I have the Sprint
    > SIM in it. That might be a viable option.


    It's worth looking into. The reason I'm crossposting to the VZW newsgroup is
    that the Samsung SCH-A790 has been available from Verizon for at least 6-9
    months, maybe longer. (The IP-790 *is* the SCH-A790. IP-790 is just Sprint's
    name for the phone.) It's likely that someone over in the VZW newsgroup has
    already done what you're asking about.

    > Other than that, what are my best options (pricewise and servicewise)
    > for
    >
    > a) using a GSM phone over 3 or 4 countries to place and receive calls
    > within Europe
    > b) ditto, but from Europe to the U.S.
    > c) ditto, but the U.S. to Europe (i.e., having it possible for people to
    > reach me)
    >
    > I have an old Bosch/Siemens GSM world phone (from back in the Sprint
    > Spectrum days, around '97 or so) that might do the job, or I might even
    > just pick up a new and more modern GSM phone.


    --
    JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET (4638)
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / [email protected] / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED

    "The wisdom of a fool won't set you free"
    --New Order, "Bizarre Love Triangle"



  3. #3
    Donkey Agony
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    Steve Sobol wrote:
    > Crossposted to Verizon newsgroup, for reasons that will be made clear
    > in a moment.


    Thanks -- I would very much like to hear of Verizon users' esperiences
    with this too!

    >> First of all, has anyone here used that phone with Sprint service in
    >> Europe? I'd love to hear what you think.

    >
    > It's not Sprint service. Note the word "Roaming" in the phrase
    > "International Roaming office."


    But, aside from the technicalities involved, I *am* also curious about
    Sprint's servicing of this. Yes, I know it's roaming, and the two may
    be identical in the way they service it, even down to the price ($1.50 a
    minute), but Sprint also may be greenhorns at it as to where it's not
    quite as seamless as VZN's service (assuming VZN *is* seamless).

    That aside, thank you for the cross-posting. I'm really mostly
    interested in the general logistics and practicality of using such a
    phone vs. an on-the-fly GSM phone and how one manages one of those
    within Europe and the U.S.A to-and-from Europe.


    --
    da
    ~~
    "OE Quotefix"
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
    to fix Outlook Express' broken quoting.





  4. #4
    Han
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    I bought an el-cheapo Italian sim card to use in my Dutch Vodaphone phone
    when I went to Italy last year. I live in NJ (US), and had bought a Dutch
    phone on a pay as you go plan previously because of frequent visits to sick
    parents, and the need to have a phone while on the go. The Vodaphone was a
    pain when using in countries other than Holland, since the call had to be
    placed, and then the callee would have to call back with high charges for
    the "abroad" calls.

    The Italian SIM card wouldn't play nice in the Vodaphone. Never could get
    it to work $80 down the drain. Anyone who wants it, just send my a $20
    bill for shipping it. Contact: iebeevoormij at verizon dot net.

    --
    Best regards
    Han
    email address is invalid



  5. #5
    Stuart Friedman
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    The phone is probably SIM locked to the Dutch network. Go over to Howard's
    forums and you can you can find advice on how to unlock it.

    Stu
    "Han" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I bought an el-cheapo Italian sim card to use in my Dutch Vodaphone phone
    > when I went to Italy last year. I live in NJ (US), and had bought a Dutch
    > phone on a pay as you go plan previously because of frequent visits to
    > sick
    > parents, and the need to have a phone while on the go. The Vodaphone was
    > a
    > pain when using in countries other than Holland, since the call had to be
    > placed, and then the callee would have to call back with high charges for
    > the "abroad" calls.
    >
    > The Italian SIM card wouldn't play nice in the Vodaphone. Never could get
    > it to work $80 down the drain. Anyone who wants it, just send my a $20
    > bill for shipping it. Contact: iebeevoormij at verizon dot net.
    >
    > --
    > Best regards
    > Han
    > email address is invalid






  6. #6
    Donkey Agony
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    Since nobody answered my questions, I thought I'd relay what I found out
    myself. Bear in mind, this is for SprintPCS -- I'm still curious as to
    the experience of any Verizon users of the equivalent phone, since
    Verizon's been doing this longer than Sprint.

    (Hmm, does anybody here ever go Europe and remain in touch back home?)

    I wrote:
    > Going to Europe for almost a month (May - June). Sprint has this new
    > Samsung "International Phone" available, the IP-A790. The Sprint
    > International Roaming office is closed weekends (I'll call them Monday
    > or Tuesday), and the web site is not all that helpful, but it *looks*
    > like all calls used in the countries I'm going to in Europe are $1.50
    > a minute, including long distance. I assume that's on top of my
    > normal service plan.


    I talked to the International Roaming folks today. The options -- if
    you want to make and receive calls from your U.S. number while in
    Europe -- are:

    a) Using the Samsung IP-A790. It retails for $549.95, but apparently
    can be had through some "web special" on the Sprint site for $379 -- I
    haven't verified this. It is NOT a locked phone, which means you could
    also use it with cheapo Euro SIMs.

    b) Renting/leasing a GSM phone from Sprint. I didn't inquire about the
    leasing cost.

    c) Using your own GSM phone, or renting/leasing one overseas.

    With ALL of those options, it costs $36 to activate the international
    service, a couple of bucks for them to ship the SIM card to you (they
    don't charge for the card, just the shipping), then $6 a month to keep
    the number/SIM active. On top of that it's $1.50 a minute, whether your
    call is to or from the U.S. or other numbers in Europe -- local or long
    distance.

    But it's $3.00 to check your voice mail! So even if you managed to use
    a cheap Euro SIM all day in Europe for local calling, then checked your
    voice mail once every night for emergency calls etc. from the U.S.,
    that's a minimum of $3.00 a day *no top of* your monthly service!

    So it ain't cheap -- this is all on top your regular service plans. I'm
    wondering -- if you already have a GSM phone (which I do, though it's a
    bit antiquated) -- if it might be better to go the Euro SIM route, then
    using something like Skype to check one's Sprint PCS voicemail.

    > First of all, has anyone here used that phone with Sprint service in
    > Europe? I'd love to hear what you think.


    Or Verizon users with the same-phone-different-name. I'd still like to
    know the answer to this.

    > I'm wondering if you can take the Sprint SIM out and put an el-cheapo
    > Euro SIM in it. That way, I could *place* calls using the cheap SIM,
    > but still receive calls on my normal U.S. number when I have the
    > Sprint SIM in it. That might be a viable option.


    Yes you can. But it's not cheap, as I pointed out above. Anyone know
    what a GSM number/SIM generally costs that you can use all over Europe?
    My first stop is Amsterdam, so I'd probably want to get one my first day
    there. Or maybe I should get a different SIM for each country I'm in.

    Anybody here have any experience with *any* of this?


    Thanks,

    --
    da
    ~~





  7. #7
    RICHARD GORDON
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    The Verizon A790 works fine in Western Europe and anyplace else where
    VZW has signed a roaming agreement with a local carrier.
    That's a big improvement from last Fall when they released the phone
    before they had their agreements signed.

    But it's not cheap

    Actually none of the US carriers have cheap international rates but
    they are still the only way to have one phone and one number.

    Bottom line for us is that if your employer pays the bill then go with
    the A790 ( or a Moto V551 if you're an ATTWS / Cingular customer) and
    enjoy the convenience.

    If you're on your own hook then the time honored alternative of an
    unlocked phone with a Euro SIM and the appropriate Nobelcom card is
    the way to go.

    Richard


    "Donkey Agony" <[email protected][127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Since nobody answered my questions, I thought I'd relay what I found

    out
    > myself. Bear in mind, this is for SprintPCS -- I'm still curious as

    to
    > the experience of any Verizon users of the equivalent phone, since
    > Verizon's been doing this longer than Sprint.
    >
    > (Hmm, does anybody here ever go Europe and remain in touch back

    home?)
    >
    > I wrote:
    > > Going to Europe for almost a month (May - June). Sprint has this

    new
    > > Samsung "International Phone" available, the IP-A790. The Sprint
    > > International Roaming office is closed weekends (I'll call them

    Monday
    > > or Tuesday), and the web site is not all that helpful, but it

    *looks*
    > > like all calls used in the countries I'm going to in Europe are

    $1.50
    > > a minute, including long distance. I assume that's on top of my
    > > normal service plan.

    >
    > I talked to the International Roaming folks today. The options --

    if
    > you want to make and receive calls from your U.S. number while in
    > Europe -- are:
    >
    > a) Using the Samsung IP-A790. It retails for $549.95, but

    apparently
    > can be had through some "web special" on the Sprint site for $379 --

    I
    > haven't verified this. It is NOT a locked phone, which means you co

    uld
    > also use it with cheapo Euro SIMs.
    >
    > b) Renting/leasing a GSM phone from Sprint. I didn't inquire about

    the
    > leasing cost.
    >
    > c) Using your own GSM phone, or renting/leasing one overseas.
    >
    > With ALL of those options, it costs $36 to activate the

    international
    > service, a couple of bucks for them to ship the SIM card to you

    (they
    > don't charge for the card, just the shipping), then $6 a month to

    keep
    > the number/SIM active. On top of that it's $1.50 a minute, whether

    your
    > call is to or from the U.S. or other numbers in Europe -- local or

    long
    > distance.
    >
    > But it's $3.00 to check your voice mail! So even if you managed to

    use
    > a cheap Euro SIM all day in Europe for local calling, then checked

    your
    > voice mail once every night for emergency calls etc. from the U.S.,
    > that's a minimum of $3.00 a day *no top of* your monthly service!
    >
    > So it ain't cheap -- this is all on top your regular service plans.

    I'm
    > wondering -- if you already have a GSM phone (which I do, though

    it's a
    > bit antiquated) -- if it might be better to go the Euro SIM route,

    then
    > using something like Skype to check one's Sprint PCS voicemail.
    >
    > > First of all, has anyone here used that phone with Sprint service

    in
    > > Europe? I'd love to hear what you think.

    >
    > Or Verizon users with the same-phone-different-name. I'd still like

    to
    > know the answer to this.
    >
    > > I'm wondering if you can take the Sprint SIM out and put an

    el-cheapo
    > > Euro SIM in it. That way, I could *place* calls using the cheap

    SIM,
    > > but still receive calls on my normal U.S. number when I have the
    > > Sprint SIM in it. That might be a viable option.

    >
    > Yes you can. But it's not cheap, as I pointed out above. Anyone

    know
    > what a GSM number/SIM generally costs that you can use all over

    Europe?
    > My first stop is Amsterdam, so I'd probably want to get one my first

    day
    > there. Or maybe I should get a different SIM for each country I'm

    in.
    >
    > Anybody here have any experience with *any* of this?
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > --
    > da
    > ~~
    >
    >






  8. #8
    Tex
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe? email?

    As a sub-thread here, can you still receive email
    ([email protected]) on the phone (the IP-A790 or one of the
    other GSM rentals) while in Europe?

    - tex





  9. #9
    scannell
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    Looks to me like a better option would be a satellite phone.

    scannell
    cols oh


    "Donkey Agony" <[email protected][127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Since nobody answered my questions, I thought I'd relay what I found out
    > myself. Bear in mind, this is for SprintPCS -- I'm still curious as to
    > the experience of any Verizon users of the equivalent phone, since
    > Verizon's been doing this longer than Sprint.
    >
    > (Hmm, does anybody here ever go Europe and remain in touch back home?)
    >
    > I wrote:
    >> Going to Europe for almost a month (May - June). Sprint has this new
    >> Samsung "International Phone" available, the IP-A790. The Sprint
    >> International Roaming office is closed weekends (I'll call them Monday
    >> or Tuesday), and the web site is not all that helpful, but it *looks*
    >> like all calls used in the countries I'm going to in Europe are $1.50
    >> a minute, including long distance. I assume that's on top of my
    >> normal service plan.

    >
    > I talked to the International Roaming folks today. The options -- if you
    > want to make and receive calls from your U.S. number while in Europe --
    > are:
    >
    > a) Using the Samsung IP-A790. It retails for $549.95, but apparently can
    > be had through some "web special" on the Sprint site for $379 -- I haven't
    > verified this. It is NOT a locked phone, which means you could also use
    > it with cheapo Euro SIMs.
    >
    > b) Renting/leasing a GSM phone from Sprint. I didn't inquire about the
    > leasing cost.
    >
    > c) Using your own GSM phone, or renting/leasing one overseas.
    >
    > With ALL of those options, it costs $36 to activate the international
    > service, a couple of bucks for them to ship the SIM card to you (they
    > don't charge for the card, just the shipping), then $6 a month to keep the
    > number/SIM active. On top of that it's $1.50 a minute, whether your call
    > is to or from the U.S. or other numbers in Europe -- local or long
    > distance.
    >
    > But it's $3.00 to check your voice mail! So even if you managed to use a
    > cheap Euro SIM all day in Europe for local calling, then checked your
    > voice mail once every night for emergency calls etc. from the U.S., that's
    > a minimum of $3.00 a day *no top of* your monthly service!
    >
    > So it ain't cheap -- this is all on top your regular service plans. I'm
    > wondering -- if you already have a GSM phone (which I do, though it's a
    > bit antiquated) -- if it might be better to go the Euro SIM route, then
    > using something like Skype to check one's Sprint PCS voicemail.
    >
    >> First of all, has anyone here used that phone with Sprint service in
    >> Europe? I'd love to hear what you think.

    >
    > Or Verizon users with the same-phone-different-name. I'd still like to
    > know the answer to this.
    >
    >> I'm wondering if you can take the Sprint SIM out and put an el-cheapo
    >> Euro SIM in it. That way, I could *place* calls using the cheap SIM,
    >> but still receive calls on my normal U.S. number when I have the
    >> Sprint SIM in it. That might be a viable option.

    >
    > Yes you can. But it's not cheap, as I pointed out above. Anyone know
    > what a GSM number/SIM generally costs that you can use all over Europe? My
    > first stop is Amsterdam, so I'd probably want to get one my first day
    > there. Or maybe I should get a different SIM for each country I'm in.
    >
    > Anybody here have any experience with *any* of this?
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > --
    > da
    > ~~
    >
    >






  10. #10
    Notan
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    scannell wrote:
    >
    > Looks to me like a better option would be a satellite phone.
    >
    > <snip>


    Have you ever priced a satellite phone w/service?

    HOLY MACKEREL!!!

    Notan



  11. #11
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    Which satellite phone companies, how many are there?, have enough
    satellites to cover how much of which continents?



  12. #12
    Stuart Friedman
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    I use a call forwarding service for the one number effect. If you sign
    up for a free account with Stanaphone.com, you'll get a New York number
    tied to a VOIP account which has call forwarding capacity. Toss $20 on
    the account and call forward it to you a European prepaid SIM.

    Call forward your sprint number to the Stanaphone number when you jump
    on the plane. Program Stanaphone to go to voicemail until you get a
    European SIM. Once you get the SIM, setup the call forward.

    Incidentally, if you want the SIM before you go, look at
    www.telestial.com. They sell European SIMs in the US, but mark the
    price up a fair amount. If you are on expense account, this is
    sometimes the way to go because you can set everything up before you
    get on the plane. If it is your own money, I'd wait.

    Incidentally, check out the Riing prepaid SIM. It has free incoming
    calls in most of Europe. Couple with Stanaphone, it is like $0.21 a
    minute to receive calls from your US number (free if you can get people
    to call Lichtenstein).

    There is an elaborate discussion of this on the forums of
    prepaidgsm.net.

    I'd skip the Sprint international phone. Just get a cheapo dual band
    or better yet a triband. 1900mhz GSM has a fair amount of roaming
    value in the Carribean, South America, etc.

    Stu




  13. #13
    Stuart Friedman
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    Please excuse my duplibcate post. I must be losing some gray matter.
    Stuart Friedman <[email protected]m.na> wrote:
    > I use a call forwarding service for the one number effect. If you

    sign
    > up for a free account with Stanaphone.com, you'll get a New York

    number
    > tied to a VOIP account which has call forwarding capacity. Toss $20

    on
    > the account and call forward it to you a European prepaid SIM.
    >
    > Call forward your sprint number to the Stanaphone number when you

    jump
    > on the plane. Program Stanaphone to go to voicemail until you get a
    > European SIM. Once you get the SIM, setup the call forward.
    >
    > Incidentally, if you want the SIM before you go, look at
    > www.telestial.com. They sell European SIMs in the US, but mark the
    > price up a fair amount. If you are on expense account, this is
    > sometimes the way to go because you can set everything up before you
    > get on the plane. If it is your own money, I'd wait.
    >
    > Incidentally, check out the Riing prepaid SIM. It has free incoming
    > calls in most of Europe. Couple with Stanaphone, it is like $0.21 a
    > minute to receive calls from your US number (free if you can get

    people
    > to call Lichtenstein).
    >
    > There is an elaborate discussion of this on the forums of
    > prepaidgsm.net.
    >
    > I'd skip the Sprint international phone. Just get a cheapo dual band
    > or better yet a triband. 1900mhz GSM has a fair amount of roaming
    > value in the Carribean, South America, etc.
    >
    > Stu





  14. #14
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    scannell wrote:
    > Looks to me like a better option would be a satellite phone.


    A satellite phone is great if you don't mind a total lack of in-building
    coverage, and iffy-at-best coverage in ares where you don't have a clear
    full view of a significant portion of the sky.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.



  15. #15
    Donkey Agony
    Guest

    Re: SprintPCS in Europe?

    Hi Stu, funny -- I had originally posted here, then because of a dearth
    of answers hightailed it over to the GSM group, where I just happened to
    see your post there on both Riiing (note: three i's, not two) and
    Stanaphone. There have been a lot of people talking about Riiing; you
    were the only one mentioning the Stanaphone/Riiing combo. After some
    investigation, I've decided to take your advice -- seems to be the best
    thing going. Then I come back here and see you've already pretty much
    answered my questions in full.

    Thanks! I've got a Riiing SIM on the way, and a Stanaphone account
    opened. A few comments inline:

    Stuart Friedman <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I use a call forwarding service for the one number effect. If you
    > sign up for a free account with Stanaphone.com, you'll get a New York
    > number tied to a VOIP account which has call forwarding capacity.
    > Toss $20 on the account and call forward it to you a European prepaid
    > SIM.


    Done. Only beef is it took a whole day for the credit to appear.

    > Call forward your sprint number to the Stanaphone number when you jump
    > on the plane. Program Stanaphone to go to voicemail until you get a
    > European SIM. Once you get the SIM, setup the call forward.


    Since I'll have the SIM in hand before I leave, might it not be better
    just to set the whole thing up beforehand? In other words, forward the
    Stanaphone number to the Riiing number well in advance, then, when I
    jump on the plane, forward my SprintPCS number to Stanaphone (which will
    in effect forward it immediately to Riiing)?

    > Incidentally, if you want the SIM before you go, look at
    > www.telestial.com. They sell European SIMs in the US, but mark the
    > price up a fair amount. If you are on expense account, this is
    > sometimes the way to go because you can set everything up before you
    > get on the plane. If it is your own money, I'd wait.


    I ordered the Riiing SIM from a German company (search for Riiing on
    Ebay). $38 incl. shipping, and includes 5 EUR credit. A bit cheaper
    than Telestial.

    > Incidentally, check out the Riing prepaid SIM. It has free incoming
    > calls in most of Europe. Couple with Stanaphone, it is like $0.21 a
    > minute to receive calls from your US number (free if you can get
    > people to call Lichtenstein).


    How do you figure $0.21? I figure about $0.13 -- 10 cents for
    Sprint-to-Stanaphone forwarding, about 3 cents for Stanaphone-to-Riiing
    forwarding, free incoming on Riiing. Where does the extra 8 cents come
    from?

    > I'd skip the Sprint international phone. Just get a cheapo dual band
    > or better yet a triband. 1900mhz GSM has a fair amount of roaming
    > value in the Carribean, South America, etc.


    Yeah, I decided against the Sprint IP -- I heard the reception wasn't
    very good. I was just going to use my old Bosch/Siemens triband from
    '97 or so, but it appears I've either misplaced it or thrown it away.
    Ordered a Motorole V3 RAZR with a bluetooth earpiece. Should be
    interesting ...


    --
    da
    ~~





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