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  1. #1
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest
    After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely large
    foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on digital
    roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    too much of a gap on their service maps.

    I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since that
    is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.

    What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?

    -mij







    See More: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?




  2. #2
    Bob Smith
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?


    "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    > Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely

    large
    > foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on

    digital
    > roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    > need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    > too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >
    > I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since

    that
    > is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >
    > What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >
    > -mij


    You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless telcos
    have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.

    Bob





  3. #3
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Bob Smith wrote:

    > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless telcos
    > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.


    Regardless, if Sprint gives a rat's ass about their customers, they'll start
    inking more CDMA digital roaming agreements.

    Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want to
    use AMPS anymore. At all.

    Shifting completely to CDMA won't totally prevent "We're from the
    government, we're here to help" lackeys from being able to snoop on you, any
    more than even the fanciest, most expensive car alarm will keep the most
    determined professional burglars from stealing your car. What it WILL do is
    make it more expensive and more of a hassle for them or anyone else to
    eavesdrop on your cellular conversations.

    It's all about security and privacy.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



  4. #4
    Bob Smith
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?


    "Steve Sobol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bob Smith wrote:
    >
    > > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless

    telcos
    > > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.

    >
    > Regardless, if Sprint gives a rat's ass about their customers, they'll

    start
    > inking more CDMA digital roaming agreements.
    >
    > Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    > White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    > anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want to
    > use AMPS anymore. At all.
    >
    > Shifting completely to CDMA won't totally prevent "We're from the
    > government, we're here to help" lackeys from being able to snoop on you,

    any
    > more than even the fanciest, most expensive car alarm will keep the most
    > determined professional burglars from stealing your car. What it WILL do

    is
    > make it more expensive and more of a hassle for them or anyone else to
    > eavesdrop on your cellular conversations.
    >
    > It's all about security and privacy.


    Sure it is, and I'm sure that it's SPCS's intent to sign up with as many
    digital roaming partners as possible. In saying that, there are still areas
    in the boonies that no one has digital coverage.

    Bob





  5. #5
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Yes, that is correct, however, CDMA, GSM, or any other digital transmission
    will prevent the geek kid that lives down the street from eavesdropping on
    your conversation with a modified police scanner. I never give out credit
    card numbers of any personal information on an analog connection for this
    reason. Note that this rule also applies to analog cordless telephones.

    -mij


    "Steve Sobol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bob Smith wrote:
    >
    >> You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    >> major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless
    >> telcos
    >> have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.

    >
    > Regardless, if Sprint gives a rat's ass about their customers, they'll
    > start inking more CDMA digital roaming agreements.
    >
    > Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    > White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    > anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want to
    > use AMPS anymore. At all.
    >
    > Shifting completely to CDMA won't totally prevent "We're from the
    > government, we're here to help" lackeys from being able to snoop on you,
    > any more than even the fanciest, most expensive car alarm will keep the
    > most determined professional burglars from stealing your car. What it WILL
    > do is make it more expensive and more of a hassle for them or anyone else
    > to eavesdrop on your cellular conversations.
    >
    > It's all about security and privacy.
    >
    > --
    > Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    > Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    > Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    > E: [email protected]he.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307






  6. #6
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Analog will go away as soon as the FCC allows cellular carriers to turn it
    off. I have heard that this will occur within the next several years. In
    this case, OnStar will also have problems since they use analog only service
    and probably get very good rates from the cell carriers for doing so.

    -mij



    "Bob Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    >> Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely

    > large
    >> foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on

    > digital
    >> roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    >> need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will
    >> be
    >> too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >>
    >> I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since

    > that
    >> is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >>
    >> What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >>
    >> -mij

    >
    > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless
    > telcos
    > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >






  7. #7
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Paul Miner wrote:

    > If you're talking about Government monitoring, then it makes
    > absolutely no difference whatsoever whether the radio portion of the
    > network is analog, digital, CDMA, TDMA, GSM, or any of the other
    > standards because they have their taps located AFTER all of that, in
    > the regular TCP/IP portion of the network. OTOH, if you meant any old
    > Joe Blow being able to listen in, then yes, analog is less secure
    > because anyone with a scanner that's able to receive those frequencies
    > will be able to listen in. They're not supposed to, of course, but
    > that's another story entirely.


    As I mentioned, CDMA encryption is not a panacea. Plus, law enforcement can
    get a warrant and force the landline and cellular carriers to install a tap
    within the POTS or cellular network. But *legal* wiretaps aren't really my
    concern. My concern is with wiretaps where the government pulls a stunt like
    invoking the Patriot Act or something like that, where (legally) the wiretap
    is in a gray area and they're trying to pull my conversation off the airwaves.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



  8. #8
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > Analog will go away as soon as the FCC allows cellular carriers to turn it
    > off. I have heard that this will occur within the next several years. In
    > this case, OnStar will also have problems since they use analog only service


    No longer true.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



  9. #9
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Almost everywhere there is cellular there is both A and B analog
    carriers, and usually at least one of those is now also CDMA. Most
    Sprint PCS phone can roam CDMA cellular. However I am still of the
    opinion that most Sprint PCS customers do not need to roam.


    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    > Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely large
    > foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on digital
    > roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    > need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    > too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >
    > I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since that
    > is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >
    > What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >
    > -mij
    >
    >
    >
    >




  10. #10
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    If you look at both Sprint PCS' and verizon's web site, you will see
    there are very, very, few areas where there is only analog. Almost all
    cellular carriers have overlaid their analog service with either CDMA or
    gsm.


    Bob Smith wrote:
    > "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    >>Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely

    >
    > large
    >
    >>foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on

    >
    > digital
    >
    >>roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    >>need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    >>too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >>
    >>I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since

    >
    > that
    >
    >>is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >>
    >>What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >>
    >>-mij

    >
    >
    > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless telcos
    > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >




  11. #11
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Jerome Zelinske wrote:
    > If you look at both Sprint PCS' and verizon's web site, you will see
    > there are very, very, few areas where there is only analog. Almost all
    > cellular carriers have overlaid their analog service with either CDMA or
    > gsm.


    If you look at Sprint's website, you won't see any analog.

    I believe Verizon has CDMA everywhere now and has for some time. They do
    additionally have AMPS in some of their legacy markets.


    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



  12. #12
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Why are you of the opinion that most SprintPCS customers do not need to
    roam?


    "Jerome Zelinske" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Almost everywhere there is cellular there is both A and B analog carriers,
    > and usually at least one of those is now also CDMA. Most Sprint PCS phone
    > can roam CDMA cellular. However I am still of the opinion that most
    > Sprint PCS customers do not need to roam.
    >
    >
    > Mij Adyaw wrote:
    >> After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    >> Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely
    >> large foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on
    >> digital roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will
    >> certainly need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise
    >> there will be too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >>
    >> I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since
    >> that is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of
    >> analog.
    >>
    >> What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >>
    >> -mij
    >>
    >>
    >>





  13. #13
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Looking at Sprint PCS' web site for Wisc. will show some analog
    roaming, not a lot, even some no service areas. I have not really
    looked around for it, but I remember verizon had some analog areas in
    Oregon.


    Steve Sobol wrote:
    > Jerome Zelinske wrote:
    >
    >> If you look at both Sprint PCS' and verizon's web site, you will
    >> see there are very, very, few areas where there is only analog.
    >> Almost all cellular carriers have overlaid their analog service with
    >> either CDMA or gsm.

    >
    >
    > If you look at Sprint's website, you won't see any analog.
    >
    > I believe Verizon has CDMA everywhere now and has for some time. They do
    > additionally have AMPS in some of their legacy markets.
    >
    >




  14. #14
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > Why are you of the opinion that most SprintPCS customers do not need to
    > roam?


    If it was such a big deal for a large number of Sprint customers, Sprint
    would probably offer better roaming options. The "America" addon isn't a bad
    idea, but it can be restrictive for people who travel extensively and end up
    off Sprint's network often.


    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



  15. #15
    Steve Sobol
    Guest

    Re: Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

    Jerome Zelinske wrote:
    > Looking at Sprint PCS' web site for Wisc. will show some analog
    > roaming, not a lot, even some no service areas. I have not really
    > looked around for it, but I remember verizon had some analog areas in
    > Oregon.


    When I said you won't see any analog, I meant you won't see any *native* analog.

    Most of that AMPS roaming *should* be CDMA by now. I don't know how much of
    it is.

    Regarding Oregon, Google for Dan Albrich's posts in alt.cellular.verizon.
    According to his experiences, Verizon's coverage in parts of Oregon is horrible.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: [email protected] Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307



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