Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    norbi
    Guest
    yes it is possible:

    1. when your company have direct access to cingular sygnaling network,
    inside GSM network SMS is transmited without ciphering (it is only
    text). sometimes when i have free time I connect my K1205 protocol
    tester and I read some SMS (it is nice fun).
    2. your company is SIM card owner, and they can read any billing (from
    and where did you receive/send SMS) if number is not company, it is
    probably personal SMS.

    I have idea: let's buy new private SIM card (ungeristered prepaid is
    the best solution in europe), and send private SMS via this card.

    regards
    BN

    SinghaLvr napisal(a):
    > Question:
    >
    > Just in case anyone knows or if anyone has any experience in this area:
    >
    > On my company phone (Cingular or Sprint), can my company read my SMS
    > messages? (I am permitted to use SMS for personal use, but I'm wondering how
    > safe are "personal" messages) ?
    >
    > Thanks ...





    See More: Can company read SMS messages?




  2. #2
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Can company read SMS messages?

    norbi wrote:
    > yes it is possible:
    >
    > 1. when your company have direct access to cingular sygnaling network,
    > inside GSM network SMS is transmited without ciphering (it is only
    > text). sometimes when i have free time I connect my K1205 protocol
    > tester and I read some SMS (it is nice fun).


    Being able to physically (and legally) attach to and actively
    participate directly with a telecommunication network at the raw
    protocol layer is one thing, sniffing an active telecommunication data
    link (wireline or wireless) at the protocol layer without a legitimate
    business need to do so is a violation of current FCC statutes.
    Additionally, for any individual to communicate to any other individual
    that a "conversation" occurred, or to divulge any details carried within
    that conversation is also a violation of FCC statutes. In most
    situations I'm aware of, only an actual employee of a telecommunication
    provider would have a legitimate business reason to engage in such
    activity. Even law enforcement is required to have a legitimate
    business reason to perform such activity, typically granted to them for
    limited periods of time and within specific limitations persuant to
    aforementioned grant, ie. judicial warrant. Currently, there is no
    statutory distinction as to whether the payload layer is encrypted or
    not regardless of who is imposing the encryption. Yes, I realize
    sniffers are used by people for a variety of purposes, but that usage
    cannot be openly construed as legitimate.

    Be careful how much fun you admit to having with your 1205.


    > 2. your company is SIM card owner, and they can read any billing (from
    > and where did you receive/send SMS) if number is not company, it is
    > probably personal SMS.


    Absolutely true. The legal client (pays the bills) of the
    telecommunication provider can, at any time, legally request, obtain,
    retain, and analyse the billing and usage details related to the
    contract the have with their telecommunications provider. Ordinarily,
    this information is available only from a historical perspective,
    however, under special circumstances, can be obtained on a "next day"
    basis, yet still historical and certainly not "live" - which requires a
    warrant.

    >
    > I have idea: let's buy new private SIM card (ungeristered prepaid is
    > the best solution in europe), and send private SMS via this card.


    This is the only viable and legal alternative available to J.Q. Citizen,
    and under the circumstances outlined by the OP, would be my
    recommendation as well.

    >
    > regards
    > BN
    >
    > SinghaLvr napisal(a):
    >
    >>Question:
    >>
    >>Just in case anyone knows or if anyone has any experience in this area:
    >>
    >>On my company phone (Cingular or Sprint), can my company read my SMS
    >>messages? (I am permitted to use SMS for personal use, but I'm wondering how
    >>safe are "personal" messages) ?
    >>
    >>Thanks ...

    >
    >



    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  3. #3
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Can company read SMS messages?

    SinghaLvr wrote:

    > Two other questions: Would I have to be near this K1205 for them to read my
    > messages? ( I tend to work from home a lot ) and if they see personal
    > numbers on the bill, could they request a "transcript" from the carrier?
    >
    >



    Would you have to be near the sniffer to risk being "discovered"?

    The Tektronix K1205 is a data link sniffer, and can be used in a
    wireline or wireless connection scenario. It also has the capability of
    recording whatever it captures.


    Would it be legally possible for your company to learn what activity
    occurred while equipment they rent was used by one of their own employees?

    Absolutely. They're paying the bill, so they're legally allowed to
    access details related to their own billing records, historically
    speaking. As to whether they would be able to access the content of
    your SMS-related message data, the answer would be no, since they don't
    own the network carrying the messages.


    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  4. #4
    Fred
    Guest

    Re: Can company read SMS messages?

    Not only can they, I read in the newspaper during the Scott Peterson trial
    the police department subpoenaed his old text messages from his cell carrier
    and they got copies of text messages he sent several months prior!

    Fred

    "SinghaLvr" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Question:
    >
    > Just in case anyone knows or if anyone has any experience in this area:
    >
    > On my company phone (Cingular or Sprint), can my company read my SMS
    > messages? (I am permitted to use SMS for personal use, but I'm wondering
    > how
    > safe are "personal" messages) ?
    >
    > Thanks ...
    >






  5. #5
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Can company read SMS messages?

    What cell phone carrier did Scott have?

    "Fred" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Not only can they, I read in the newspaper during the Scott Peterson trial
    > the police department subpoenaed his old text messages from his cell
    > carrier and they got copies of text messages he sent several months prior!
    >
    > Fred
    >
    > "SinghaLvr" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> Question:
    >>
    >> Just in case anyone knows or if anyone has any experience in this area:
    >>
    >> On my company phone (Cingular or Sprint), can my company read my SMS
    >> messages? (I am permitted to use SMS for personal use, but I'm wondering
    >> how
    >> safe are "personal" messages) ?
    >>
    >> Thanks ...
    >>

    >
    >






  6. #6
    Thurman
    Guest

    Re: Can company read SMS messages?


    "Fred" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Not only can they, I read in the newspaper during the Scott Peterson trial
    > the police department subpoenaed his old text messages from his cell
    > carrier and they got copies of text messages he sent several months prior!


    Under the archival law of Texas that went into effect Jan 1977(?), records
    retention was classified as short (7 years), medium (7 to 100 years) and
    long (greater than 100 years).

    Totally unrelated, scientist claim that if you have journal of your entire
    life of all actions while awake, you would only have recorded two gigabytes
    of text. Two gigabyte SD chips have dropped to $165, which puts a new view
    on the value of a person's life work.





  7. #7
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: Can company read SMS messages?

    Thurman wrote:
    > "Fred" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Not only can they, I read in the newspaper during the Scott Peterson trial
    >>the police department subpoenaed his old text messages from his cell
    >>carrier and they got copies of text messages he sent several months prior!

    >
    >
    > Under the archival law of Texas that went into effect Jan 1977(?), records
    > retention was classified as short (7 years), medium (7 to 100 years) and
    > long (greater than 100 years).
    >
    > Totally unrelated, scientist claim that if you have journal of your entire
    > life of all actions while awake, you would only have recorded two gigabytes
    > of text. Two gigabyte SD chips have dropped to $165, which puts a new view
    > on the value of a person's life work.
    >
    >


    Oh gawd, not this again. The cost of storage has no bearing whatsoever
    on the value of the data stored.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  • Similar Threads