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  1. #16
    Steve Henderson
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD



    O/Siris wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >
    >>I
    >>lost my phone in July and called up for my "free" replacement and I was
    >>told there was a $50 deductible even though there was nothing mentioned
    >>in the contract I signed or any documentation that they gave me.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I'm glad your situation was solved, but you're wrong nonetheless. ERP
    > (Equipment Replacement Plan) has *always* had a deductible payment on
    > it. It's mentioned in the pamphlet, it's mentioned on the website, and
    > it always has been.


    I am NOT wrong. It was never mentioned in my contract, which is the
    legally binding document that the Sprint representative and I signed.
    There was no mention to check their website for further details or check
    a pamphlet which they never gave me and which they didn't even stock in
    the store. As a consumer, I am not responsible for searching their
    website for information. I might not even have had Internet access as
    far as they knew.

    I have homeowners insurance, car insurance and health insurance and the
    deductibles for each are specifically mentioned in the contracts.

    If Sprint/Lockline was right, they wouldn't have given in to the
    Attorney General's office.

    The bottom line is; if something isn't mentioned in the signed contract,
    then it isn't enforceable or legal! That's why they have contracts; to
    take out the guesswork.

    > It was a business decision, not a factual one, that got your money back.
    >


    If it had been a business decision to give it back, they would have done
    that back in July when I made my many calls to them. It was a decision
    by Sprint not to be charged with fraud which the Attorney General of New
    York was doing. Do you think the Attorney General's office would have
    wasted their time if I didn't have a legal case? I sent them a copy of
    the contract and the facts. They must have thought that I had a case
    because they pursued it for me and I prevailed.

    Steve Henderson




    See More: Sprint committing outright FRAUD




  2. #17
    O/Siris
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    In article <QEi5f.3361$%[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > and the funny thing is, it only costs them
    > like 10 bucks to actually make the phone...it's not like they can't give you
    > a phone....and it wouldn't kill them to actually treat a customer like gold.
    >


    You're wrong. First, because it does *not* cost "10 bucks to actually
    make the phone." Sprint isn't a manufacturer of phones, either, so even
    if you find any real proof of this claim (and you won't), Sprint isn't
    the one selling a $10 piece of equipment for $300. If Sprint is selling
    it for $300, Sprint paid $250 to get it. Actually more. The margins on
    the phones *before the rebate* are paper thin.

    Secondly, because of that, yes it *would* kill them to treat a customer
    "like gold" in the manner you expect.

    --
    R
    O/Siris
    -+-
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    +Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792+



  3. #18
    O/Siris
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > I am NOT wrong. It was never mentioned in my contract, which is the
    > legally binding document that the Sprint representative and I signed.
    >


    That document covers the service for which you signed up for two years.
    Not add-ons that had nothing to do with the 2-year agreement.

    --
    R
    O/Siris
    -+-
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    +Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792+



  4. #19
    O/Siris
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > If it had been a business decision to give it back, they would have done
    > that back in July when I made my many calls to them.
    >


    No. A floor rep doesn't have the authority to credit back that
    deductible.

    No one has a crystal ball into what happened that day in the store. But
    I know how many different places that deductible is cited, and I know
    that, truly, there is NOTHING that promises a customer a free phone via
    ERP.

    It wasn't worth the $50 to have a fight through the attorney-general.
    But, to be quite blunt about it, I don't believe that things happened in
    the manner you claim.

    --
    R
    O/Siris
    -+-
    A thing moderately good
    is not so good as it ought to be.
    Moderation in temper is always a virtue,
    but moderation in principle is always a vice.
    +Thomas Paine, "The Rights of Man", 1792+



  5. #20

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    Steve Henderson wrote:
    > Lyle,
    >
    > Sorry to hear about the "free phone" fraudulent scam they pulled on you.
    > I also was a victim of fraud but it was different than yours, but maybe
    > I can help you get your problem resolved. My problem involved the
    > warranty on the phone for which I paid a monthly charge of $5.00. I
    > lost my phone in July and called up for my "free" replacement and I was
    > told there was a $50 deductible even though there was nothing mentioned
    > in the contract I signed or any documentation that they gave me.


    You must have received some seriously weird documentation. The $10
    (warranty replacement) and $50 (non-warranty replacement) deductibles
    were clearly disclosed when I purchased my phone with the equipment
    replacement option.



  6. #21
    Central
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    On Wed, 19 Oct 2005 07:52:57 -0700, Steve Sobol wrote:
    <snip>
    >
    > Where have you been? Everyone does that. T-Mobile's the least bad in that
    > regard; they only ever do 1-year contracts (never 2). Plus I just found out
    > that if I trade in my current phone they'll give me a new phone at the
    > subsidized price without a contract extension. But they're the only carrier
    > that does that at all...


    I did not say they were the only ones. This is after all a topic about
    Sprintpcs and their practices not T-Mobile or Verizon. Breaking down each
    company's marketing ploys followed by a compare/contrast discussion would
    be best done in a completely different topic.



  7. #22
    Bob Smith
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD


    "Lyle Walsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Lucky me, I spent so much $$ at SPRINT that they sent me a free phone! So
    > I called up and ask "what's this?" They say its free, I say no thanks I
    > have 3 phones, 3 lines and 3 family members on plan, don't need another.
    > "Keep it its free, save it in case one of your phones break". So guess
    > what, they activated it to a new number and billed me for the number!!
    > So after 15 min going through person after person who can't figure out
    > what to do I get transferred to "Special Service" which means ignore. I
    > waited 20 min listening to musac, no answer. So beware free gifts! Sprint
    > is committing fraud on gullible customers, this is no different than the
    > magazine co that sends you free magazines and later sends you a bill.
    > Anyone else being ripped of in this way?
    > nospamLyleNOSPAM


    I find this thread very curious, as I've never heard of SPCS sending out a
    new phone out to a customer, when one was not ordered and that's going back
    to 1998. Has anyone else here received a new phone from SPCS, just out of
    the blue, with no prior correspondence or conversations with SPCS personnel?

    Bob





  8. #23
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    >My problem involved the warranty on the phone for which I paid a monthly charge of >$5.00.

    Cellular "Insurance" is always a scam.

    It costs $60 per year + a $50 deductible to receive an often times ...
    used phone as a replacement. They can even give you a different phone
    as a replacement (read the fine print).

    All of the accessories that you purchased for your phone which would be
    useless would then be a complete loss possibly in excess of the
    replacement phone value.

    Or $170 over two years to get a new "used" phone.

    After two years you are probably ready for a new phone anyway.

    Lockline makes money hand over fist on these plans.

    It's better to just set aside $10 per month in a cookie jar for an "new
    phone" fund, protect your phone as much as possible, and take the money
    out of the cookie jar should something bad happen and garantee yourself
    a brand new phone of your choosing.

    Yes, if something happened within 3 months it would be real nasty, but
    so would getting a flat tire on the 110 freeway during rush hour. S**t
    happens.

    If you are betting that you are going to lose it in the first 6 months,
    but all means get "the insurance".

    If you think you have a 90%+ chance of making it past that, I would do
    the cookie jar thing.

    "Extended warranty, how can I lose?" - Homer Simpson upon completing a
    "stupidification" procedure




  9. #24
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    >It wasn't worth the $50 to have a fight through the attorney-general.
    >But, to be quite blunt about it, I don't believe that things happened in
    >the manner you claim.


    Don't feel bad. To be quite blunt about it, he doesn't believe that
    anything happens the way a customer says it does if the experience was
    negative with Sprint.

    He told me that I had a "share" of the blame for being transferred to a
    busy signal or dropped 13 times last week.

    Apparently I demanded to be hung up on. That's his official position,
    and he is sticking to it.

    O/Siris is the Sprint spin guy.

    If you want to see what the majority really thinks, look at the JD
    Power survey's and other surveys that consistently rank Sprint PCS last
    in Customer Service.

    What the survey's fail to mention, however, is that all of the
    problem's are the customers fault.

    Those danged pollsters. Someone should sue them for libel and slander.




  10. #25
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    "Steve Sobol" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > T-Mobile's the least bad in that
    > regard; they only ever do 1-year contracts (never 2). Plus I just found out
    > that if I trade in my current phone they'll give me a new phone at the
    > subsidized price without a contract extension. But they're the only carrier
    > that does that at all...


    Not sure if the deal you were offered is a new thing, but my daughter
    who has been a T-Mobile customer for four years was only offered a $50
    rebate towards a recent handset upgrade (Motorola Razr). That doesn't
    compare favorably with the $150 handset upgrade rebate I get from Sprint.

    --
    John Richards



  11. #26
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    "Tinman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > I just bought a Treo 650 (love it so far) and was told I had 30 days to
    > add the protection plan. I normally don't even consider it. But I've
    > noticed a big difference between my old phones and the Treo PDA/phone: I
    > used to drop my old phones at least once a day without issue (phone gets
    > knocked from holster, etc.).


    I tried a holster for a while, but either the phone gets knocked out
    while entering/exiting a car, or else it stabs me in the ribs during
    that maneuver. My current phone is small enough to fit in a pants
    pocket, but that wouldn't work for a Treo 650. Sometimes I envy
    my wife's purse (no snide remarks, please).

    --
    John Richards



  12. #27
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    "Bob Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > I find this thread very curious, as I've never heard of SPCS sending out a
    > new phone out to a customer, when one was not ordered and that's going back
    > to 1998. Has anyone else here received a new phone from SPCS, just out of
    > the blue, with no prior correspondence or conversations with SPCS personnel?


    No, I've never heard of Sprint pulling a stunt like that, and I've been
    following this newsgroup for quite a few years.

    --
    John Richards



  13. #28
    Tinman
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD

    John Richards wrote:
    > "Tinman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> I just bought a Treo 650 (love it so far) and was told I had 30 days
    >> to add the protection plan. I normally don't even consider it. But
    >> I've
    >> noticed a big difference between my old phones and the Treo
    >> PDA/phone: I used to drop my old phones at least once a day without
    >> issue (phone
    >> gets knocked from holster, etc.).

    >
    > I tried a holster for a while, but either the phone gets knocked out
    > while entering/exiting a car, or else it stabs me in the ribs during
    > that maneuver. My current phone is small enough to fit in a pants
    > pocket,


    Yep, I'm not a big fan of holsters myself. So last year when I bought my
    Sanyo 8200 I went with a perfect-fitting pouch-style belt-case. When its
    swivel-clip broke I could no longer find that case in stock. So I ended
    up with a holster for the last month or two. Before the holster, not a
    single scratch. Two-weeks into the holster, scratches galore.

    I thought about keeping it a pants pocket. But between keys, Leatherman,
    coins, etc., etc., there was just no room.


    > but that wouldn't work for a Treo 650. Sometimes I envy
    > my wife's purse (no snide remarks, please).


    From me? Never! I mean, if you want to carry a man-bag I'm OK with it.
    Heck, go all out and get a murse.

    Seriously though, the full-to-the-brim front pockets, belt-clipped Treo,
    and wallet in the back pocket is really a PITA (pun intended). Still, I
    just won't do the "man-bag" thing and the ever-popular backpack is a bit
    of an overkill (even though I do travel by motorcycle 90% of the time).


    --
    Mike | Last words of Thomas Grasso, executed in 1995:
    | "I did not get my Spaghetti-O's, I got spaghetti.
    | I want the press to know this."





  14. #29
    Steve Henderson
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD



    O/Siris wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >
    >>I am NOT wrong. It was never mentioned in my contract, which is the
    >>legally binding document that the Sprint representative and I signed.
    >>

    >
    >
    > That document covers the service for which you signed up for two years.
    > Not add-ons that had nothing to do with the 2-year agreement.


    You are wrong again! The contract I signed, specifically mentioned the
    add-ons such as text messaging charges, insurance/extended warranty
    charges, etc. Once again, that is what contracts are for. Maybe my
    contract is different from the one you signed.

    Steve Henderson




  15. #30
    Steve Henderson
    Guest

    Re: Sprint committing outright FRAUD



    O/Siris wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >
    >>If it had been a business decision to give it back, they would have done
    >>that back in July when I made my many calls to them.
    >>

    >
    >
    > No. A floor rep doesn't have the authority to credit back that
    > deductible.


    That may be true, however I also talked to managers at Sprint and
    Lockline and they DO have (or should have) the capability to return my
    money when they are wrong or when just want to keep a customer satisfied
    or avoid a fight.
    >
    > No one has a crystal ball into what happened that day in the store. But
    > I know how many different places that deductible is cited, and I know
    > that, truly, there is NOTHING that promises a customer a free phone via
    > ERP.


    That deductible may be mentioned in many places, however if it isn't in
    the contract, or referenced in another document in the contract, then it
    is NOT legally binding, as the Attorney General of New York's office
    agreed with me. Do you know more than they do? Are you an attorney, a
    Sprint representative or just somebody shooting off their mouth without
    knowing the laws? If you are an attorney and you are making these
    ignorant statements, you need to go back and study your contractual law.
    If you are a Sprint representative, you need to spend more time
    keeping your customers happy rather than arguing with them and forcing
    them to leave in droves to your competitors. If you are just shooting
    off your mouth, please save your weak arguments because they hold no
    merit. Check your contract. Mine mentions only the monthly fee, NOT a
    deductible. Does yours mention a deductible?
    >
    > It wasn't worth the $50 to have a fight through the attorney-general.
    > But, to be quite blunt about it, I don't believe that things happened in
    > the manner you claim.
    >


    So if "it isn't worth the $50 to have a fight through the attorney
    general", then all of the people here that have fraud complaints should
    do exactly as I did, since that seems to be the only way they settle
    with their unsatisfied customers. I made it very clear to the Sprint
    reps and managers what my plans were in advance. I told them the
    following: 1) I was going to make my appeal to Sprint and Lockline Reps
    and managers, seeking a peaceful resolution of the problem. 2) I was
    going to contest the charge on my credit card. (I lost that contest
    because Lockline told them that I agreed to the $50 charge before they
    would send me the phone. This was the Catch 22 situation I mentioned in
    my first post.) 3) I was going to charge them with fraud with the New
    York Attorney General. 4) I was going to take them to small claims
    court and sue them. They knew from the beginning that there was going
    to be a fight, so if they wanted to avoid one, they would have returned
    my money in the first place. It wasn't the $50 they were concerned
    with, it was the fraud charge.

    I won, they lost, end of story!

    Steve Henderson




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