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  1. #1
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest
    I am looking for EVDO and Bluetooth all in a small package. I hope that all
    of the new Sprint phones have bluetooth as bluetooth has become a staple of
    modern day life. It is even included in most high-end automobiles. I am
    tired of wired-headsets. Currently the only choice is a cheesy LG phone.
    Please note that not all LG phones are cheesy, but the current LG bluetooth
    phone really is very cheesy.

    -mij





    See More: Where are the new Sprint Phones




  2. #2
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    To take full advantage of EVDO, you will need a phone that can do nice
    things with EVDO (unless you just plan to use it as a modem).

    The PPC-6700 has the latest Bluetooth standards, has EVDO, and
    completely eliminates the need to carry a laptop computer for 1 or 2
    day trips.

    It is larger than the usual $99 plastic phones, but when you figure
    that it is a micro-laptop, a phone, a camera, a camcorder, an MP3
    player, and a video player ... it seems well worth it at around $500
    (or whatever you can negotiate it for).

    It ships with a belt clip case that makes it as easy to carry as any
    small plastic phone. Will even go into a pants pocket.




  3. #3
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    Oh, I forgot to mention ... it also has Wi-Fi.




  4. #4
    Mike Callery
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    And do you feel that the phone is really that much better than a Treo 650?


    "FWIW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > To take full advantage of EVDO, you will need a phone that can do nice
    > things with EVDO (unless you just plan to use it as a modem).
    >
    > The PPC-6700 has the latest Bluetooth standards, has EVDO, and
    > completely eliminates the need to carry a laptop computer for 1 or 2
    > day trips.
    >
    > It is larger than the usual $99 plastic phones, but when you figure
    > that it is a micro-laptop, a phone, a camera, a camcorder, an MP3
    > player, and a video player ... it seems well worth it at around $500
    > (or whatever you can negotiate it for).
    >
    > It ships with a belt clip case that makes it as easy to carry as any
    > small plastic phone. Will even go into a pants pocket.
    >






  5. #5
    stevie
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    I was in the mall yesterday and a Sprint salesman showed me a new phone that
    had EVDO. But I can't remember the phone name or brand. Wasn't a Treo or
    other well known brand. I think it was Star...
    or something similar.

    Salesman said it wasn't in wide distribution yet.

    It had a hidden keyboard that would slide out.

    "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    I am looking for EVDO and Bluetooth all in a small package. I hope that all
    of the new Sprint phones have bluetooth as bluetooth has become a staple of
    modern day life. It is even included in most high-end automobiles. I am
    tired of wired-headsets. Currently the only choice is a cheesy LG phone.
    Please note that not all LG phones are cheesy, but the current LG bluetooth
    phone really is very cheesy.

    -mij






  6. #6
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    I have used both.

    Is it "better"? It really all depends.

    The PPC does have Wi-Fi, and the camera is a true 1.3 Megapixel rig.
    It has Windows Media Player and it has true multi-tasking. It has more
    memory (what they did with the Treo 650 memory was pathetic, IMHO), and
    a faster processor. It also has EVDO where the Treo does not .. and you
    can GREATLY tell the difference in data speed.

    The Treo has a higher-res screen, and the keyboard is placed more
    conveniently for firing off quick text messages (as opposed to the PPC
    pullout keyboard).

    The PPC makes for a more capable all around device ... basically a
    micro-computer that can do most of what a laptop computer can (plus a
    little more with the camera and a camcorder), but the Treo would get
    the nod toward pure telephony and quick SMS functions.

    Therefore, if *I* could carry only one device, it would be the
    PPC-6700, although the Treo would be a close second.

    Plus, the Palm OS is going to be more or less phased out over the next
    few years, so, like it or not, Windows Mobile is something we are all
    eventually going to have to get used to.

    It is a highly personal choice based on one's own preferences, and they
    are both top-notch phones, I just think the PPC is a half-generation
    ahead at this point.




  7. #7
    Tinman
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    FWIW wrote:
    > I have used both.
    >
    > Is it "better"? It really all depends.
    >
    > The PPC does have Wi-Fi, and the camera is a true 1.3 Megapixel rig.
    > It has Windows Media Player and it has true multi-tasking. It has
    > more memory (what they did with the Treo 650 memory was pathetic,
    > IMHO)


    A large part of the problem with the Treo's NVFS overly-aggressive
    memory usage has been addressed by a fix several months ago. But I don't
    believe "average users" (whoever they are) understand how NVFS works.
    NVFS is really just like an internal memory card.

    The actual RAM in a Treo 650 is used for a copy of the "ROM" (stored in
    a zip file in NVFS) and dbcache (the equivalent to the available RAM
    left for applications on a PC, after the OS is loaded). Anything that
    appears to the user as being in "memory" is really just in NVFS (which
    is treated like a disk, FAT file system and all).

    In other words, you can pretty much fill up the internal (NVFS) memory
    to near-capacity, and still have the same amount of RAM (dbcache) to run
    all of your apps. There isn't much need to conserve "memory" (NVFS) as
    in the pre-NVFS days. But the OS doesn't make this "hidden" RAM--that is
    actually doing most of the work--easy to see (I use third-party
    utilities to see it--and to manage dbcache).

    A good analogy to a PPC is NVFS is the "Storage Memory" side of a PPC's
    memory slider, whereas dbcache is the "Program Memory" side (assuming a
    pre-WM5 device--WM5 handles persistent storage a bit differently than
    Palm). There just isn't any memory slider on NVFS Palms ^_^. You want
    more available RAM (dbcache)? Build a custom ROM and remove unnecessary
    apps (the Sprint demos, etc.).

    Regardless, most all of my stuff is on SD (2 GB), so the onboard memory
    is just for stuff that I need access to should I have another card
    inserted (e.g., from a camera). Even with that, I still have around 11
    MB NVFS free.


    >, and a faster processor. It also has EVDO where the Treo does
    > not .. and you can GREATLY tell the difference in data speed.
    >


    EV-DO is a great plus. But for me it ain't as important. According to
    Sprint's map, EV-DO isn't available in many of the areas I would use it
    in--and they have no intention of adding it (at this point in time).

    But even though I can barely use it, if I were to buy an EV-DO device
    from Sprint, it might not be possible to keep my grandfathered Vision
    plan (which includes unlimited SMS). While the EV-DO (Power Vision)
    plans aren't that more expensive than Vision, in my case it would mean
    at least an addition $40 per month. I'm not even talking about
    tethering--just using the devices on their own (I rarely tethered in the
    past, and haven't needed to tether--aside from testing--since I got the
    Treo).

    Some folks claim if you try really really hard, and the God's are on
    your side, you can convince a SPCS CSR to just switch you to EV-DO
    without removing your promo code (which, once removed, will only allow
    the entry of currently-valid codes--mine ain't one of 'em). Even folks
    who *did* convince a CSR to leave their account alone when activating an
    EV-DO device, found out the next day that Sprint did them a favor by
    changing their plan on their behalf. How nice.


    > The Treo has a higher-res screen, and the keyboard is placed more
    > conveniently for firing off quick text messages (as opposed to the PPC
    > pullout keyboard).
    >


    That's a big plus for me. With my Treo, I rarely use the stylus
    (actually, I often need only the D-pad--but love the thumb-board for
    easy text entry). When testing a PPC-6700, and this could be because I
    was--at the time--still using a PPC daily, it seemed I would be using
    the stylus more often than I would prefer.

    And to be frank, I just wasn't into the sliding keyboard thing. I prefer
    a thumb-board (enhanced via KeyCaps650 of course).


    > The PPC makes for a more capable all around device ... basically a
    > micro-computer that can do most of what a laptop computer can (plus a
    > little more with the camera and a camcorder), but the Treo would get
    > the nod toward pure telephony and quick SMS functions.
    >


    That was the other issue I had with the 6700--it was a bit more PDA than
    phone for my tastes. A keyboard-less WM Smart Phone, OTOH, is not PDA
    enough for my tastes. For me, the Treo 650 was nice compromise. And I
    waited till the Treo line had high-res and a decent CPU before even
    considering one.

    But I'm not sure how much more I can do with a PPC, in my line of work
    (DB programmer), than I can with my Treo. I edit native Office documents
    on both, but my job doesn't revolve around that (not all day, at least).
    Regardless, I do use it to write-up reports, record expense logs, etc.
    Email of course is a given.

    I also have the TS Client, and use it to access various TS as well as
    Remote Desktop to my primary PC. Yes this might not be for Joe-Six-Pack
    (VPNs and such), but it works in a pinch.

    For entertainment I can find nothing wrong with TCMP. It is a great
    player! I use PocketDivXEncoder (brain-dead simple to use) to convert
    DVDs and HTPC files for my Treo. I generally have around 3-4 hours of
    video with me at any given time. Use it everyday? Nope. But I have used
    it when waiting on an appointment, at an airport, etc.

    MobiTV is pretty call--and far better than when I tried it on my
    cellphone. But that's something that will truly shine with EV-DO speeds.

    Oh yea, I gotta say that streaming Internet radio and Shoutcast (via
    Pocket Tunes) is definitely something I use. The quality is excellent,
    and I literally have hundreds of streams to choose from. It's almost
    like having satellite radio. The bitrate of course is not as high, but
    the sound is pretty darn good for CDMA 1x (and with EV-DO, you should be
    able just about much satellite radio's quality).

    For regular music, Pocket Tunes can be used for syncing. But there are
    now iTunes compatible solutions for the Treo (or I guess most current
    Palms). This allows syncing to iTunes, sort of like the Rockr--but
    without the 100 song limitation.


    > Therefore, if *I* could carry only one device, it would be the
    > PPC-6700, although the Treo would be a close second.
    >


    Though I prefer the Treo, obviously the 6700 would be my next choice (if
    I could get around the forced &^%$# EV-DO plan that I probably won't
    use).

    Unfortunately, if on business, I generally can't rely on one device. I
    really need my laptop to get serious work done. But for working with
    Office files, email, the occasional TS session, I at least can "get by"
    if someone needs my help and I have no other access but my Treo.


    > Plus, the Palm OS is going to be more or less phased out over the next
    > few years, so, like it or not, Windows Mobile is something we are all
    > eventually going to have to get used to.


    You might want to rethink that. Indeed, according to a recently leaked
    document, Sprint might be getting the next Palm OS Treo (700p) as early
    as this coming January.

    The leaked document came from an apparently disgruntled Palm investor,
    who posted the PDF to the their Website. They immediately took it down,
    but the Treo, even Treo-specific Websites (treocentral.com, mytreo.net,
    and treonauts.com) were mentioned. Here's something interesting:
    ==========================
    We know that PALM will introduce four new models in CY 06.

    In January they will introduce the already announced Treo 700 Windows
    which will be a Verizon exclusivity it will be the first EV-DO Treo on
    the market. Around the same time we believe PALM will launch a Treo 700p
    running PALM OS on the Sprint network, both devices will keep same form
    factor and will capitalize on the Treo's strong foothold in the US
    enterprise Market.

    We also learned that PALM will be launching two new products around
    March 06 codenamed "Hollywood" and "Lowrider". According to the Morgan
    Stanley analyst in Asia (covers HTC) the estimate production output will
    be 200K devices/month.

    "Hollywood" will be a fancier 3G/GSM smartphone which will represent
    PALM's first attempt at the European GSM market. We know the phone will
    have no external antenna and will probably he launched by Cingular in
    the US.

    "Lowrider" will be a sub-$300 devices utilizing previous generation
    radios and providing PALM with an entry level PDA.

    ==========================

    The company that leaked this document, Sagio, is a Palm investor (5%).
    They posted it on their Website than pulled it--sending stern warnings
    to Treo Websites not to reproduce it. But if you search Google--at least
    for now--using "Palm_SAGIO_Research.pdf" towards the bottom of the page
    will be a PDF link to "] Palm Inc. October 2005." The PDF link won't
    work, but "View as HTML" is still cached (for now!!!). At least one
    person has already mirrored that cached page.

    For the record, I doubt Sprint will be getting the Treo 700p in January.
    If they were, there would be enough pre-production models around that
    we'd have seen some bona-fide photos. But it does seem clear the Treo
    700p is coming--and coming to Sprint. I'm more than happy to let Verizon
    users work out the inevitable bugs in the first WM incarnation of a
    Treo.


    --
    Mike





  8. #8
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    >I was in the mall yesterday and a Sprint salesman showed me a new phone that
    >had EVDO. But I can't remember the phone name or brand. Wasn't a Treo or
    >other well known brand. I think it was Star...
    >or something similar.
    >Salesman said it wasn't in wide distribution yet.
    >It had a hidden keyboard that would slide out.




    That sure sounds like the PPC-6700, but it doesn't have "star" in the
    name.

    Sometimes it is called the "HTC Apache", or the "Audiovox 6700".

    Then again, maybe they have something brand-spanking new in the
    pipeline already - but seeing as the 6700 hasn't really been full on
    "launched" yet, the odds are that he showed you the 6700 (or maybe the
    older 6601 which also has a slide out keyboard).

    Those are the only two Sprint phones with a slide-out right now.

    Maybe they are bringing over the Samsung SCH-i830 which also has a
    slide.

    The only "star" phone I know of is the Audiovox UTStarcom which is just
    a flip-phone without keyboard.

    Next time you pass the store, see if you can grab the model number. If
    they have something new under wraps, it would be cool to know what it
    is.




  9. #9
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    Tinman,

    Don't get me wrong, I am a long time loyal PALM guy.

    I had the first connected Palm, the Palm VII back in 1999.

    Since then, I have owned the Treo 300, the Treo 600, and Treo 650.

    The only time I was disappointed was when I went from the Treo 600 to
    the Treo 650. As a matter of fact, the now 650 sits, and when I carry
    my Treo, I carry the 600. The 600 is snappier, the 5 wav works better
    (IMHO), and support for things such as Callfilter just seem to work
    better.

    I understand the NVFS and NVRAM and VRAM structure of the PPC's and the
    Treo, but for crying out loud, NVRAM is so dang dirt cheap, that anyone
    who doesn't put 128MB+ in their high end devices is just being penny
    wise and pound foolish, IMHO.

    I couldn't even sync my 600 data to my 650. Yes, yes, I had powerrun
    to put 3rd party apps on my 1GB SD, but I had to empty out quite a few
    memo's, contacts, etc. It was compeltely asinine to have LESS usable
    memory in an upgraded device, and as I am sure you know, many early
    adopters were irked.

    And while the Treo is capable of being a MP3 (I love pocket tunes),
    video player, Snappermail (a must), MS Office worker, etc ... you have
    to put some cheese in for the apps. It makes the PPC's a little more
    cost efficient, because you can do most all of these out of the box and
    it really does shave about $100-$200 off the total cost of a similarly
    configured device.

    And I hate dropping TELNET, SSH and VPN connections simply because I
    want to look up a contact, change tasks breifly, or when Snapper
    decides to check mail. The multitasking cannot be overlooked by a
    power user. I know the Treo has some basic multitasking (PocketTunes,
    etc), but it is not a powerful part of the current PALM OS.

    PALM OS has actually lost market share year over year, and i'm afraid
    that is the direction it is headed. There is only so much more you can
    do with it .... without basically turning it into Windows Mobile with a
    different skin.

    I too, wish the Pocket PC worked better without the stylus, but the new
    5-way Joystick and "OK" buttons on the 6700 makes me only have to pull
    out the stylus occasionally, and after purchasing Windows Voice
    Command, I sit there and talk to the phone. I only have to press one
    button, and it will call who I want, play songs by Artist, Genre, etc
    .... tell me how much batter power I have left, what appointments are
    coming up, and tons of other stuff.

    Honestly, in day to day use, I grab the stylus maybe three or four
    time. A vast improvement over the other models which require the
    stylus to do anything.

    They actually tried to make this model more "Treo-like" in it's one
    handed usage, and while not succeeding 100%, they certainly got 3/4ths
    of the way there.

    Also, with the same headset, Bluetooth works significantly better on
    the PPC. I'm sure the new Treo will fix this.

    And EVDO and Wi-Fi are hard to overlook. Clocking 1Mbs+ anywhere in a
    hotspot is pretty darn sweet. And the 1.3 Megapixel camera (with beam
    flash) is ACTUALLY, finally, a viable alternative to carrying a
    seperate dedicated camera. For family portraits? No. For print
    quality? No. But for a quick snapshot, or to post on the web in
    1280x1024 ... absolutely. They actually look like digital photgraphs
    instead of an afterthought. Streaming audio works great, as does
    streaming video, especailly with EVDO or Wi-Fi. And I have watched my
    share of movies and/or TV shows that I transferred to the memory card.
    Windows Media Player actually does a good job with all of the above,
    and there are plenty of third party apps if it just doesn't do it for
    you.

    I think that for the raw power user, the PPC-6700 vs. the Treo 650 goes
    to the PPC.

    But the comparison is a little unfair, as one is a year older than the
    other.

    The PPC-6700 vs. the Treo 700x is going to be a whole different ball of
    wax. If PALM can get it righ this time, load the thing up with cheap
    NVRAM (why not just put 256 in there for $29??). I hope they put the
    whole ball of wax into it this time and make it what it should have
    been in the 650.

    Generous memory, multitasking, voice recognition, better bluetooth,
    good camera, wi-fi, EVDO ... and this thing could be the absolute best
    of all worlds. It would be the perfect device, IMHO.

    Here's hoping it happens!




  10. #10
    Tinman
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    FWIW wrote:
    > Tinman,
    >
    > Since then, I have owned the Treo 300, the Treo 600, and Treo 650.
    >
    > The only time I was disappointed was when I went from the Treo 600 to
    > the Treo 650. As a matter of fact, the now 650 sits, and when I carry
    > my Treo, I carry the 600. The 600 is snappier, the 5 wav works better
    > (IMHO), and support for things such as Callfilter just seem to work
    > better.
    >


    By the time the Treo 600 was released, 160 x 160 was just not going to
    cut-it for me. Pretty much the number one reason that stopped me from
    getting one.

    I also took notice of the issues that plagued many Treo 650
    early-adopters and decided to wait before buying. Specifically, I
    figured I wouldn't buy one till Sprint officially "fixed" the Treo so
    that BT DUN was enabled (as they said they would do, in late 2004)--nor
    till the NVFS memory over-use was corrected. Ironically, now that I've
    bought one and DUN is indeed enabled (without needing a hack), I find
    it's something I probably will hardly use.

    Regardless, I think that someone buying an up-to-date Treo 650 now (or
    recently) is in a different position than someone who bought one in 2004
    (indeed, even a different hardware version). Combine that with the
    advances in must-have add-on utilities and you (can) have a rather
    powerful device.

    I can't say I'd feel the same way if I'd bought one in 2004, and had to
    stumble through the growing pains.


    > I understand the NVFS and NVRAM and VRAM structure of the PPC's and
    > the Treo, but for crying out loud, NVRAM is so dang dirt cheap, that
    > anyone who doesn't put 128MB+ in their high end devices is just being
    > penny wise and pound foolish, IMHO.
    >


    Well "NVRAM" that people usually refer to on a Treo is not really RAM at
    all--it is flash memory (too slow to be used as RAM, and not setup to
    used as RAM anyway). Sure memory is cheap--and Palm did end up, before
    the NVFS fix, giving out free SD cards to make up for the lost storage
    space due to the original NVFS debacle.

    But increasing the size of the NVFS flash "disk" is not going to help
    the issue with real RAM and dbcache--and that is where I find the
    biggest problem with Palm NVFS devices occurs. If I could only have one
    or the other, I'd choose to have more actual RAM than NVFS (flash)
    memory. I can come darn close to making up for a shortage of NVFS memory
    via SD. But right now there's nothing I can do about freeing up true RAM
    (well, actually there is: I made my ROM image smaller to allow dbcache
    to be larger, and I use Resco Locker along with DBCache tool to manage
    the beast).

    Regardless, after the heat they took over the Treo 650 I would expect
    the 700 series to have more memory (hopefully not just double).


    >
    > And while the Treo is capable of being a MP3 (I love pocket tunes),
    > video player, Snappermail (a must), MS Office worker, etc ... you
    > have to put some cheese in for the apps.


    So far, as I use the included Versamail and Docs2Go, the only extra cost
    listed above--in my case--would be for Pocket Tunes. Even then you don't
    need to buy it unless you want its extra features compared to the
    included Real Player (e.g., WMA and streaming support). The included
    Real Player will still play MP3s (or TCMP, which is astounding at
    video).

    With unlimited SMS and intelligent forwarding, I am immediately notified
    of any important email (or all email, if I want). I then check it via
    Versamail if it seems important--and Versamail is set to auto-retrieve
    hourly from 7 AM to 10 PM. It ain't exactly push email, but fine for my
    needs--for no additional charge.


    > It makes the PPC's a little
    > more cost efficient, because you can do most all of these out of the
    > box and it really does shave about $100-$200 off the total cost of a
    > similarly configured device.
    >


    I don't think $100-$200 is a realistic figure. Not everyone wants to do
    everything. I've seen people with Treos that haven't even synced them
    once, let alone added third-party apps (not kidding).

    But there are "must-have" apps that power-users on both platforms
    consider a necessity--and many are commercial (many are freeware too).


    > And I hate dropping TELNET, SSH and VPN connections simply because I
    > want to look up a contact, change tasks breifly, or when Snapper
    > decides to check mail. The multitasking cannot be overlooked by a
    > power user. I know the Treo has some basic multitasking (PocketTunes,
    > etc), but it is not a powerful part of the current PALM OS.
    >


    Palm OS is in the dark-ages when it comes to multi-tasking (and I
    seriously doubt that is going to change with the Treo 700p). However, in
    my real-world usage, it hasn't been that big of a deal. Since I use it
    as a phone first and use SPCS (CDMA) I have a bigger problem being able
    to use data and voice at the same time. My Treo can't help that
    situation. But it would be nice to start downloading a Webpage or start
    a TS session, and then use another app while the page/screen is rendered
    (besides just listening to music).


    > PALM OS has actually lost market share year over year, and i'm afraid
    > that is the direction it is headed. There is only so much more you
    > can do with it .... without basically turning it into Windows Mobile
    > with a different skin.
    >


    Well that's not the direction the OS is intended to go, at least at this
    time ('Nix, yes, WM, no). Whether it succeeds, or even makes it to that
    stage, remains to be seen.

    And the PDA market in general has been declining. I certainly have no
    intention of buying a dedicated PDA ever again (and I started before the
    Newton was even released). Palm turned their attention to "smart
    devices," which are not usually included in the dwindling--over-all--PDA
    sales figures.

    I'm pretty sure the Treo alone has outsold all WM phones--combined. And
    based on that leaked document, which confirms what I see nearly every
    time I travel, Palm doesn't seem to consider WM's other licensees as
    much of a threat (after-all, they license the OS too now). It is the
    Blackberry that they seem concerned about addressing.

    If WM is a hit within the Treo lineup, great. But it will be awhile
    before many Palm OS Treo fans convert.

    I also wouldn't want Palm OS to evaporate. Without Palm OS, WinCE would
    probably still be back at version 2.x and ActiveSync would still stink
    (email syncing on only one PC?!). And I am only assuming the latest
    version of AS is greatly-improved; I haven't actually used it.


    >
    > Also, with the same headset, Bluetooth works significantly better on
    > the PPC. I'm sure the new Treo will fix this.
    >


    We shall see. At CES (IIRC, 1999) the then-new Bluetooth people claimed
    that Bluetooth chipsets would eventually add no more than $0.05 to the
    cost of a device.

    Apparently Palm's Treo team took that as gospel and one nickel per-unit
    was budgeted for Bluetooth implementation in the Treo 650. <g>


    >
    > I think that for the raw power user, the PPC-6700 vs. the Treo 650
    > goes to the PPC.
    >


    Only if one is willing to go with a more-PDA-than-phone device. The Treo
    650, admittedly with the appropriate apps, can be very powerful. Yet
    it's still--to me--acceptable as a phone. A PPC-6700 is just too much
    like holding an iPaq to my ear for my tastes.


    > But the comparison is a little unfair, as one is a year older than the
    > other.
    >
    > The PPC-6700 vs. the Treo 700x is going to be a whole different ball
    > of wax. If PALM can get it righ this time, load the thing up with
    > cheap NVRAM (why not just put 256 in there for $29??). I hope they
    > put the whole ball of wax into it this time and make it what it
    > should have been in the 650.
    >
    > Generous memory, multitasking, voice recognition, better bluetooth,
    > good camera, wi-fi, EVDO ... and this thing could be the absolute best
    > of all worlds. It would be the perfect device, IMHO.
    >
    > Here's hoping it happens!


    I have been burned by hype too many times to even have hope anymore.
    Now, I believe it when I see it (and with the Treo 650, even that took
    more than 8 months).

    My predication is the 700s will be like most prior releases: two steps
    forward, one step back. If the stuff you care about is in the "forward"
    category, you are one happy camper. But if you happen to be in the "one
    step back" camp, you are SOL (at least at first). Yes there will be a
    net gain, but I expect the usual early-adopter surprises (more so from
    the Winmob camp <g>).

    On the other hand, should the 700p turn out to be too enticing, I might
    be tempted back into early-adopterhood. If that should happen it's
    possible that a year from now--in this very NG--I'll be telling someone
    why my Treo 700 sits in a drawer while my 650 is still in use.


    --
    Mike





  11. #11
    Andrea J Richardson
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    Oh it is definitely better than the Treo 650.


    "Mike Callery" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > And do you feel that the phone is really that much better than a Treo 650?
    >
    >
    > "FWIW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> To take full advantage of EVDO, you will need a phone that can do nice
    >> things with EVDO (unless you just plan to use it as a modem).
    >>
    >> The PPC-6700 has the latest Bluetooth standards, has EVDO, and
    >> completely eliminates the need to carry a laptop computer for 1 or 2
    >> day trips.
    >>
    >> It is larger than the usual $99 plastic phones, but when you figure
    >> that it is a micro-laptop, a phone, a camera, a camcorder, an MP3
    >> player, and a video player ... it seems well worth it at around $500
    >> (or whatever you can negotiate it for).
    >>
    >> It ships with a belt clip case that makes it as easy to carry as any
    >> small plastic phone. Will even go into a pants pocket.
    >>

    >
    >






  12. #12
    Tinman
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    Andrea J Richardson wrote:
    > Oh it is definitely better than the Treo 650.
    >


    The only thing "definite" is the opinion of the person using the phone.
    You can't make blanket statements based on your own opinion.

    For one thing, you don't speak for me. For me the PPC-2700 is definitely
    not better than the Treo 650 (tried both before buying). Notice I wrote
    "for me?" Others prefer the older i500. While *I* don't think the i500
    is better than a Treo 650, it doesn't mean the device isn't "better" for
    someone else.

    It's also rather amusing that the original poster stated in the first
    post, explicitly, that he didn't want a PDA ("the other one is a PDA,
    which I don't want"). Maybe my English skills aren't that good, but to
    me that means he doesn't want any PDA phone.


    --
    Mike | Most people don't realize that large pieces of
    | coral, attached to the skull by common wood
    | screws, can make a child look like a deer.





  13. #13
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    Tinman is absolutely right.

    There is no such thing as a "better" phone anymore than there is a
    "better" pizza.

    One of my family members vastly prefers their teeny tiny plastic phones
    that does NOTHING other than make a phone call. It's a tri-band that
    gets reception EVERYWHERE, has a battery life that make other phones
    look like power-hogs, and weighs about as much as a raisin. This is
    their "perfect" phone. They think that my smartphone obession is silly
    (Why do you need all of that? What a waste!).

    Some people can't like without the walke-talkie function, which none of
    the smartphones have.

    Phones are all about personal preferences.

    There are some things the PPC has which I wish the Treo had, and some
    things the Treo has that I wish the PPC had.

    Truth be told, they can both accomplish almost identical tasks, you
    just have to take slightly different routes to get there.

    As a daily carrier *I* carry the PPC-6700. But every now and then
    (especially when I think I am going to be doing some serious text
    messaging), I grab the Treo instead.

    They are both cutting edge smartphones, and while I have a preference,
    I could not in all honestly declare one "better" than the other.

    They have a different OS, and a different UI.

    Is Apple better than Windows? Is Windows better than Linux? Is OS/X
    better than Solaris? Is Symbian better than Windows Mobile? Is Palm
    better tham Symbian?

    You'll get a different answer from everyone you ask, and nobody is
    wrong.




  14. #14
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    Since you have a Treo and a PPC, do you have two lines of Sprint service for
    both of your phones?


    "FWIW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Tinman is absolutely right.
    >
    > There is no such thing as a "better" phone anymore than there is a
    > "better" pizza.
    >
    > One of my family members vastly prefers their teeny tiny plastic phones
    > that does NOTHING other than make a phone call. It's a tri-band that
    > gets reception EVERYWHERE, has a battery life that make other phones
    > look like power-hogs, and weighs about as much as a raisin. This is
    > their "perfect" phone. They think that my smartphone obession is silly
    > (Why do you need all of that? What a waste!).
    >
    > Some people can't like without the walke-talkie function, which none of
    > the smartphones have.
    >
    > Phones are all about personal preferences.
    >
    > There are some things the PPC has which I wish the Treo had, and some
    > things the Treo has that I wish the PPC had.
    >
    > Truth be told, they can both accomplish almost identical tasks, you
    > just have to take slightly different routes to get there.
    >
    > As a daily carrier *I* carry the PPC-6700. But every now and then
    > (especially when I think I am going to be doing some serious text
    > messaging), I grab the Treo instead.
    >
    > They are both cutting edge smartphones, and while I have a preference,
    > I could not in all honestly declare one "better" than the other.
    >
    > They have a different OS, and a different UI.
    >
    > Is Apple better than Windows? Is Windows better than Linux? Is OS/X
    > better than Solaris? Is Symbian better than Windows Mobile? Is Palm
    > better tham Symbian?
    >
    > You'll get a different answer from everyone you ask, and nobody is
    > wrong.
    >






  15. #15
    FWIW
    Guest

    Re: Where are the new Sprint Phones

    >Since you have a Treo and a PPC, do you have two lines of Sprint service for
    >both of your phones?


    One family plan with 5 different numbers on 5 different phones.

    It seems like one of the phones is always due for an upgrade.




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