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  1. #1
    SMS
    Guest
    The ACSI measures consumer satisfaction across a range of goods and
    services.

    See "http://www.theacsi.org/press_releases/0506q1.htm"

    "The wireless telephone service industry improved 5% this year to 66 –
    still significantly below the national average [of overall satisfaction
    with all goods and services]. T-Mobile gains 8% to a score of 69 to
    join Verizon Wireless at the top of the industry. Most of the other
    companies in wireless have higher ACSI scores than they did a year ago,
    except for Sprint Nextel which remains tied at the bottom of the
    industry with Cingular at a score of 63."



    See More: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates ConsumerSatisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingularand Sprint tied at the bottom.




  2. #2
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Tue, 16 May 2006 09:48:06
    -0700, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The ACSI measures consumer satisfaction across a range of goods and
    >services.
    >
    >See "http://www.theacsi.org/press_releases/0506q1.htm"
    >
    >"The wireless telephone service industry improved 5% this year to 66 –
    >still significantly below the national average [of overall satisfaction
    >with all goods and services]. T-Mobile gains 8% to a score of 69 to
    >join Verizon Wireless at the top of the industry. Most of the other
    >companies in wireless have higher ACSI scores than they did a year ago,
    >except for Sprint Nextel which remains tied at the bottom of the
    >industry with Cingular at a score of 63."


    The differences between 63 and 66 and 69 are of course quite small.
    The acknowledged margin for error at the firm level is at least 2-3%, and it
    may well be worse than that, due to "non-response bias." See "A White Paper
    on RESEARCH SAMPLING" by Insight MAS at
    <http://www.insightmas.com/documents/WhitePaper-Sampling.pdf>:

    Sometimes researchers are even more blatant in their disregard for
    the legitimacy of proper sampling techniques by engaging in
    "over-sampling." This is a technique whereby an unlimited list of
    potential respondents is obtained from the targeted population and
    contacts are made on that list until the "magic number" is reached.
    The widely recognized American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI),
    for example, completes over 30,000 consumer surveys by telephone each
    calendar quarter, but dials nearly 300,000 consumers to accomplish
    that many. Despite its response rate of around 10%, the ACSI’s
    methodological report indicates no serious attempt at preventing or
    detecting non-response bias. Most qualified statisticians would
    suggest that the ACSI would be better serving their audiences by
    reporting, say, 300 properly obtained completed surveys than the
    30,000 obtained by over-sampling.

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  3. #3
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.


    "John Navas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
    >
    > In <[email protected]> on Tue, 16 May 2006 09:48:06
    > -0700, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>The ACSI measures consumer satisfaction across a range of goods and
    >>services.
    >>
    >>See "http://www.theacsi.org/press_releases/0506q1.htm"
    >>
    >>"The wireless telephone service industry improved 5% this year to 66 -
    >>still significantly below the national average [of overall satisfaction
    >>with all goods and services]. T-Mobile gains 8% to a score of 69 to
    >>join Verizon Wireless at the top of the industry. Most of the other
    >>companies in wireless have higher ACSI scores than they did a year ago,
    >>except for Sprint Nextel which remains tied at the bottom of the
    >>industry with Cingular at a score of 63."

    >
    > The differences between 63 and 66 and 69 are of course quite small.
    > The acknowledged margin for error at the firm level is at least 2-3%, and
    > it
    > may well be worse than that, due to "non-response bias." See "A White
    > Paper
    > on RESEARCH SAMPLING" by Insight MAS at
    > <http://www.insightmas.com/documents/WhitePaper-Sampling.pdf>:
    >
    > Sometimes researchers are even more blatant in their disregard for
    > the legitimacy of proper sampling techniques by engaging in
    > "over-sampling." This is a technique whereby an unlimited list of
    > potential respondents is obtained from the targeted population and
    > contacts are made on that list until the "magic number" is reached.
    > The widely recognized American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI),
    > for example, completes over 30,000 consumer surveys by telephone each
    > calendar quarter, but dials nearly 300,000 consumers to accomplish
    > that many. Despite its response rate of around 10%, the ACSI's
    > methodological report indicates no serious attempt at preventing or
    > detecting non-response bias. Most qualified statisticians would
    > suggest that the ACSI would be better serving their audiences by
    > reporting, say, 300 properly obtained completed surveys than the
    > 30,000 obtained by over-sampling.
    >
    > --



    Rubbish- a poorly written "article" by a competitor (if you can call them
    that). Their customer base leaves a lot to be desired- when Roto Rooter is
    one of your top clients, comenting on others is probably not a good idea.





  4. #4
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Tue, 16 May 2006 20:08:57 -0600,
    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"John Navas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> In <[email protected]> on Tue, 16 May 2006 09:48:06
    >> -0700, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>The ACSI measures consumer satisfaction across a range of goods and
    >>>services.
    >>>
    >>>See "http://www.theacsi.org/press_releases/0506q1.htm"
    >>>
    >>>"The wireless telephone service industry improved 5% this year to 66 -
    >>>still significantly below the national average [of overall satisfaction
    >>>with all goods and services]. T-Mobile gains 8% to a score of 69 to
    >>>join Verizon Wireless at the top of the industry. Most of the other
    >>>companies in wireless have higher ACSI scores than they did a year ago,
    >>>except for Sprint Nextel which remains tied at the bottom of the
    >>>industry with Cingular at a score of 63."

    >>
    >> The differences between 63 and 66 and 69 are of course quite small.
    >> The acknowledged margin for error at the firm level is at least 2-3%, and
    >> it
    >> may well be worse than that, due to "non-response bias." See "A White
    >> Paper
    >> on RESEARCH SAMPLING" by Insight MAS at
    >> <http://www.insightmas.com/documents/WhitePaper-Sampling.pdf>:
    >>
    >> Sometimes researchers are even more blatant in their disregard for
    >> the legitimacy of proper sampling techniques by engaging in
    >> "over-sampling." This is a technique whereby an unlimited list of
    >> potential respondents is obtained from the targeted population and
    >> contacts are made on that list until the "magic number" is reached.
    >> The widely recognized American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI),
    >> for example, completes over 30,000 consumer surveys by telephone each
    >> calendar quarter, but dials nearly 300,000 consumers to accomplish
    >> that many. Despite its response rate of around 10%, the ACSI's
    >> methodological report indicates no serious attempt at preventing or
    >> detecting non-response bias. Most qualified statisticians would
    >> suggest that the ACSI would be better serving their audiences by
    >> reporting, say, 300 properly obtained completed surveys than the
    >> 30,000 obtained by over-sampling.


    >Rubbish- a poorly written "article" by a competitor (if you can call them
    >that). Their customer base leaves a lot to be desired- when Roto Rooter is
    >one of your top clients, comenting on others is probably not a good idea.



    That criticism isn't valid, and can't be dismissed so easily -- non-response
    bias is a real problem in surveys, and that criticism mirrors conclusions of
    respected researchers; e.g.,

    Research Paper: Low Response Rates and Their Effects on Survey Results
    <http://www.sch.abs.gov.au/SCH%5CA1610103.NSF/0/3CE43BABF8BBF59DCA256B7C0001AEA4?OpenDocument=>

    Overall, we can conclude that non response bias can have significant
    detrimental effects on the accuracy of survey estimates. These
    effects can be reduced through higher response rates. From this, it
    is recommended that steps should be taken to ensure that the response
    rates achieved in any particular survey are as high as possible.
    Response rates can be increased through good survey practices such as
    the use of high quality questionnaires, increased interviewer
    training, assuring respondents of the confidentiality of the
    information they provide and dedication of resources and time to
    following up non respondents.

    With a response rate of only 10%, the ACSI is quite vulnerable to non-response
    bias, significantly increasing the margin of error. In other words, specific
    scores should be taken with a grain of salt.

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  5. #5
    Tinman
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    John Navas wrote:
    >
    > With a response rate of only 10%, the ACSI is quite vulnerable to
    > non-response
    > bias, significantly increasing the margin of error. In other words,
    > specific
    > scores should be taken with a grain of salt.


    Rubbish. There is no doubt that you would have a completely different
    stance had Cingular--your pet carrier--come out on top.

    Yet they never seem to on any survey. Oh wait, that's not quite true:
    they are still running ads based on that ridiculous survey Cingular paid
    for themselves ("yes, it's true, a leading independent research firm
    said so").


    --
    Mike





  6. #6
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.


    "John Navas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    >>Rubbish- a poorly written "article" by a competitor (if you can call them
    >>that). Their customer base leaves a lot to be desired- when Roto Rooter
    >>is
    >>one of your top clients, comenting on others is probably not a good idea.

    >
    >
    > That criticism isn't valid, and can't be dismissed so easily --
    > non-response
    > bias is a real problem in surveys, and that criticism mirrors conclusions
    > of
    > respected researchers; e.g.,
    >
    > Research Paper: Low Response Rates and Their Effects on Survey Results
    > <http://www.sch.abs.gov.au/SCH%5CA1610103.NSF/0/3CE43BABF8BBF59DCA256B7C0001AEA4?OpenDocument=>


    So you've gone from quoting a fourth-rate competitor to quoting an
    Australian government office?

    >
    > Overall, we can conclude that non response bias can have significant
    > detrimental effects on the accuracy of survey estimates. These
    > effects can be reduced through higher response rates. From this, it
    > is recommended that steps should be taken to ensure that the response
    > rates achieved in any particular survey are as high as possible.
    > Response rates can be increased through good survey practices such as
    > the use of high quality questionnaires, increased interviewer
    > training, assuring respondents of the confidentiality of the
    > information they provide and dedication of resources and time to
    > following up non respondents.
    >
    > With a response rate of only 10%, the ACSI is quite vulnerable to
    > non-response
    > bias, significantly increasing the margin of error. In other words,
    > specific
    > scores should be taken with a grain of salt.
    >


    Rubbish- you simply can't stand that Cingular is being rated so poorly. And
    BTW- a 10% response rate is considered high.





  7. #7
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report EvaluatesConsumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings,Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    Scott wrote:

    > Rubbish- you simply can't stand that Cingular is being rated so poorly. And
    > BTW- a 10% response rate is considered high.


    Actually it's considered extremely high, resulting in an extremely low
    margin of error. Of course you'll always have people that claim that the
    other 90% all would have responded differently!



  8. #8
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report EvaluatesConsumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings,Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    Tinman wrote:

    > Yet they never seem to on any survey. Oh wait, that's not quite true:
    > they are still running ads based on that ridiculous survey Cingular paid
    > for themselves ("yes, it's true, a leading independent research firm
    > said so").


    Even the company that did the survey for Cingular said that Cingular's
    conclusion, from the survey data, was bogus. It's pretty bad when the
    company you pay to do a survey refutes to even back you up! Clearly the
    firm that did the survey was very worried about their reputation after
    Cingular's false claims.



  9. #9
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.


    "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Scott wrote:
    >
    >> Rubbish- you simply can't stand that Cingular is being rated so poorly.
    >> And BTW- a 10% response rate is considered high.

    >
    > Actually it's considered extremely high, resulting in an extremely low
    > margin of error.


    I'll have to do a little digging in the morning to see what the expected
    take rate on our company survey is (done by an outside vendor)- I want to
    say that 11 or 12% is a good day.

    > Of course you'll always have people that claim that the other 90% all
    > would have responded differently!


    Yeah- Navas will start chiming in before long. We'll get another Google
    link to a poorly written and marginally credible source along with some more
    of his pontification on the subject, as this is yet another area he claims
    expertise in. After all, he's a graduate of GU (Google University).





  10. #10
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report EvaluatesConsumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings,Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    Scott wrote:
    > "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Scott wrote:
    >>
    >>> Rubbish- you simply can't stand that Cingular is being rated so poorly.
    >>> And BTW- a 10% response rate is considered high.

    >> Actually it's considered extremely high, resulting in an extremely low
    >> margin of error.

    >
    > I'll have to do a little digging in the morning to see what the expected
    > take rate on our company survey is (done by an outside vendor)- I want to
    > say that 11 or 12% is a good day.


    Well I should clarify what I said. Surveying 10% of the total users is
    considered a very high rate, with a very low margin of error. But
    sending out surveys to 10% of the total users, and getting only a 10%
    response rate on those 10%, would be a low response rate. A reputable
    survey firm would not even report results in this case. I.e., in
    Consumer Report's wireless survey, they don't state the results if the
    number or responses is too low for an accurate result.



  11. #11
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report EvaluatesConsumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings,Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    Scott wrote:
    > "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Scott wrote:
    >>
    >>> Rubbish- you simply can't stand that Cingular is being rated so poorly.
    >>> And BTW- a 10% response rate is considered high.

    >> Actually it's considered extremely high, resulting in an extremely low
    >> margin of error.

    >
    > I'll have to do a little digging in the morning to see what the expected
    > take rate on our company survey is (done by an outside vendor)- I want to
    > say that 11 or 12% is a good day.


    It depends on the type of survey. I've worked for semiconductor
    companies where we surveyed our large customers, and the response rate
    was extremely high, over 90%, and where a 10% response rate would be
    considered meaningless. If you're doing a consumer survey, and can get
    10% responses from the surveys you've sent out, that is a statistically
    very large sample with a very low margin of error. What's especially
    good about a survey like the Consumer Reports wireless survey, is that
    they divide the responses by region, not just by carrier. The ACSI
    survey, at least the published summary of it, doesn't do that. The
    results could be different in different regions, for services such as
    wireless (and airlines, supermarkets, etc.)



  12. #12
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Wed, 17 May 2006 20:09:23
    -0700, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Tinman wrote:
    >
    >> Yet they never seem to on any survey. Oh wait, that's not quite true:
    >> they are still running ads based on that ridiculous survey Cingular paid
    >> for themselves ("yes, it's true, a leading independent research firm
    >> said so").

    >
    >Even the company that did the survey for Cingular said that Cingular's
    >conclusion, from the survey data, was bogus.


    Yet another fabrication. What it actually said:

    In a letter sent on Monday to the four largest wireless companies,
    Telephia confirmed that Cingular had a "statistically significant
    lower dropped-call rate than the competition across some market/time
    period groupings." But Telephia also said it had "no knowledge of the
    specific methodology (markets, time periods or statistical
    thresholds) Cingular used to reach the nationwide 'lowest dropped
    call' conclusion."

    >It's pretty bad when the
    >company you pay to do a survey refutes to even back you up! Clearly the
    >firm that did the survey was very worried about their reputation after
    >Cingular's false claims.


    Hardly.

    And then there's the part about your favorite carrier that you always
    conveniently leave out:

    Take Verizon Wireless. Since early 2005, the company has run ads
    promoting its network reliability. Some of the ads highlight the fact
    that about 100 of the company's engineers drive around the country
    making calls to compare Verizon phones with those of other carriers.
    Not surprisingly, Verizon has found that it has the best service.

    Funny how you criticize only Cingular when Verizon didn't even use a third
    party for its claims.

    For those interested in the complete story:
    <http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/03/business/media/03adco.html?ei=5088&en=b376483a9562df2b&ex=1304308800&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&pagewanted=all>
    or <http://tinyurl.com/mnhx8>
    For registration: <http://www.bugmenot.com/view/www.nytimes.com>

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  13. #13
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Wed, 17 May 2006 20:05:40
    -0700, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Scott wrote:
    >
    >> Rubbish- you simply can't stand that Cingular is being rated so poorly. And
    >> BTW- a 10% response rate is considered high.

    >
    >Actually it's considered extremely high, resulting in an extremely low
    >margin of error. ...


    You're either blinded by your bias or ignorant of statistics -- which is it?

    NON-RESPONSE BIAS
    If you try to survey 100 people, and 40 of them don't respond, those 40
    could be different in some important way from the 60 who did respond.
    That's non-response bias - a problem often ignored in survey research.
    Non-response bias can be estimated by comparing data on the current sample
    with other data (e.g. from a Census) on the same population.
    <http://www.audiencedialogue.org/gloss-data.html>

    NONRESPONSE BIAS ANALYSES AT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION STATISTICS
    In surveys with low response rates, non-response bias can be a major
    concern. While it is not always possible to measure the actual bias
    due to non-response, there are different approaches that help
    identify potential sources of non-response bias. In the National
    Center for Education Statistics (NCES), SURVEYS WITH A RESPONSE RATE
    LOWER THAN 70% MUST CONDUCT A NON-RESPONSE BIAS ANALYSIS. This paper
    discusses the different approaches to non-response bias analyses
    using examples from NCES. [emphasis added]
    <http://www.statcan.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno=11-522-X20010016269>

    The ACSI response rate, which results from the method used, is actually very
    low from a statistical standpoint (see above), which is why non-response bias
    is such a significant issue. To minimize non-response bias, responsible
    statisticians strive for response rates well in excess of 50%, but that takes
    follow-up with non-respondendents, which is time-consuming and expensive.
    See:

    * Berg, N. Non-response bias, In Kempf-Leonard, K. (ed.), Encyclopedia
    of Social Measurement vol. 2, pp. 865-873, London, Academic Press.

    <http://www.utdallas.edu/~nberg/Berg_ARTICLES/BergNon-ResponseBiasMay2002.pdf>

    * Investigating non-response bias in a survey of disablement in the
    community: implications for survey methodology, A Tennant and EM Badley
    ARC Epidemiology Research Unit, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
    <http://jech.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/45/3/247>

    * A confidence interval approach to investigating non-response bias and
    monitoring response to postal questionnaires, A Tennant and EM Badley
    ARC Epidemiology Research Unit, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
    <http://jech.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/45/1/81>

    * National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey III,
    Accounting For Item Nonresponse Bias, Westat, Inc.

    <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/nhanes3/cdrom/NCHS/MANUALS/NR_BIAS.PDF>

    * Research Paper: Low Response Rates and Their Effects on Survey Results

    <http://www.sch.abs.gov.au/SCH%5CA1610103.NSF/0/3CE43BABF8BBF59DCA256B7C0001AEA4?OpenDocument=>

    * "A White Paper on Research Sampling" by Insight MAS
    <http://www.insightmas.com/documents/WhitePaper-Sampling.pdf>

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  14. #14
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

    In <[email protected]> on Thu, 18 May 2006 04:43:45
    -0700, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Scott wrote:
    >> "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> Scott wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Rubbish- you simply can't stand that Cingular is being rated so poorly.
    >>>> And BTW- a 10% response rate is considered high.
    >>> Actually it's considered extremely high, resulting in an extremely low
    >>> margin of error.

    >>
    >> I'll have to do a little digging in the morning to see what the expected
    >> take rate on our company survey is (done by an outside vendor)- I want to
    >> say that 11 or 12% is a good day.

    >
    >It depends on the type of survey. I've worked for semiconductor
    >companies where we surveyed our large customers, and the response rate
    >was extremely high, over 90%, and where a 10% response rate would be
    >considered meaningless. If you're doing a consumer survey, and can get
    >10% responses from the surveys you've sent out, that is a statistically
    >very large sample with a very low margin of error.


    If and only if you can demonstrate lack of non-response bias. See my
    citations earlier in this thread.

    >What's especially
    >good about a survey like the Consumer Reports wireless survey, is that
    >they divide the responses by region, not just by carrier.


    What's especially bad is that it's a self-selected sample from a limited
    population. Also that it lumps different technologies (D-AMPS and GSM, iDEN
    and CDMA) together.

    >The ACSI
    >survey, at least the published summary of it, doesn't do that. The
    >results could be different in different regions, for services such as
    >wireless (and airlines, supermarkets, etc.)


    True. In addition, given the low response rate, it's subject to non-response
    bias.

    --
    Best regards, SEE THE FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS AT
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  15. #15
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Report Evaluates Consumer Satisfaction with Wireless Carriers. T-Mobile and Verizon top ratings, Cingular and Sprint tied at the bottom.

    In alt.cellular.t-mobile John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Take Verizon Wireless. Since early 2005, the company has run ads
    > promoting its network reliability. Some of the ads highlight the fact
    > that about 100 of the company's engineers drive around the country
    > making calls to compare Verizon phones with those of other carriers.
    > Not surprisingly, Verizon has found that it has the best service.
    >
    > Funny how you criticize only Cingular when Verizon didn't even use a third
    > party for its claims.
    >


    Verizon takes pride in how it gathers this information. I once saw on
    television what they do with those trucks. They have several phones hooked up
    in vans which are automated. The driver drives from place to place and they
    check coverage. Simple.

    If Verizon's reputation were such that it was in contrast to what they claim,
    then I would consider their results to be problematic, but that is not the
    case. Their claims are backed up by the fact that customers simply like them
    the best [at the expense of cash in their wallets].

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1




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