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  1. #1
    Jackson Page
    Guest
    Saw the following post a few weeks ago on this group. Thought it was
    SPAM, but I was moving to Sprint anyhow and it works. I check my minutes
    each day and I have now 1100 min on the FREE Home plan

    No sure how long before they pull the program, but I have a 2 yr
    contract!

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=

    This works and I want to share it with everyone

    Sprints commercials talk about sticking it to the man, well guess who
    this sticks

    You can get UNLIMITED in and out minutes by doing the following:

    Step 1 Go to www.voicestick.com and sign up for the USA/Canada plan @
    $19.99 or the UNLIMITED Min. GLOBAL plan @ $24.99 or the per min plan @
    2.4 cents

    Step #2 Sign up for the cheapest Sprint phone program, which is the Fair
    and Flexible at $29.99, then add the new Sprint to Home program for $5.00
    a month.

    Step #3 When you tell the Sprint agent your "HOME" number give them your
    new Voicestick home number
    (Here is the trick. With Sprint to Home all calls to or from this "Home"
    number are not
    chargeable and they are unlimited!)

    Step #4 In your account set up at voicestick.com go to the bridge set up
    and put in your cell number and then go to call forwarding and set up
    your cell phone number there too.

    Voicestick.com is the ONLY Cellular capable voip company that has a built
    in bridge, that I have found.What the bridge does is allow you to get a
    new dial tone to call out on UNLIMITED VOIP (or a pay as you go plan for
    2 cents a min.) When I call my new "home" Voicestick number the VOIP
    company sees my caller ID and gives me a dial out tone. I then dial like
    normal. (You can even program voice stick into the address book of the
    phone)My person I call sees the voip number on their caller id and when
    they call back to my new "home" number it forwards to my cell.

    So both out going and incoming calls are now free of Sprint charges.

    Options: I also bought for $30 the MG3 line adapter so I also get a
    second line at my home that the kids now use.
    I also downloaded the free Soft Phone so I use that too when I can't find
    a good cell signal but I find a network or wireless connection (I am now
    covered just about anywhere)

    To sum it all up! For my $35 basic Sprint plan and the $20 for voip, I
    have unlimited cell and a unlimited home phone.





    See More: Doing cheap VOIP on Sprint cell does work




  2. #2
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Doing cheap VOIP on Sprint cell does work

    Jackson Page wrote:
    > Saw the following post a few weeks ago on this group. Thought it was
    > SPAM, but I was moving to Sprint anyhow and it works. I check my minutes
    > each day and I have now 1100 min on the FREE Home plan
    >
    > No sure how long before they pull the program, but I have a 2 yr
    > contract!


    Rather than support this spammer, you COULD save on cell phone minutes
    as well as landline LD charges, at least when you're near a computer, by
    using Skype, which apparently now offers free unlimited calls to the US
    and Canada until the end of the year.

    THAT doesn't cost anything, except maybe the price of a good headset/mic.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.



  3. #3

    Re: Doing cheap VOIP on Sprint cell does work

    Isaiah Beard wrote:
    > Jackson Page wrote:
    >
    >> Saw the following post a few weeks ago on this group. Thought it was
    >> SPAM, but I was moving to Sprint anyhow and it works. I check my
    >> minutes each day and I have now 1100 min on the FREE Home plan
    >>
    >> No sure how long before they pull the program, but I have a 2 yr
    >> contract!

    >
    >
    > Rather than support this spammer, you COULD save on cell phone minutes
    > as well as landline LD charges, at least when you're near a computer, by
    > using Skype, which apparently now offers free unlimited calls to the US
    > and Canada until the end of the year.
    >
    > THAT doesn't cost anything, except maybe the price of a good headset/mic.


    Not to mention the fact that the whole idea of doing VOIP over Vision
    threatens the all-you-can-eat-for-one-price concept of Vision.

    If I were working for Sprint, I'd be looking into legal and technical
    means to block VOIP over Vision. You can bet SPCS will do so as soon as
    they notice any significant traffic cannibalizing their voice minutes.

    And if they can't figure out how to shut down VOIP over Vision, you can
    be certain that they'll stop offering $10/month all-you-can-eat IP and
    switch to per-byte tariffs.



  4. #4
    Tinman
    Guest

    Re: Doing cheap VOIP on Sprint cell does work

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Isaiah Beard wrote:
    >> Jackson Page wrote:
    >>
    >>> Saw the following post a few weeks ago on this group. Thought it was
    >>> SPAM, but I was moving to Sprint anyhow and it works. I check my
    >>> minutes each day and I have now 1100 min on the FREE Home plan
    >>>
    >>> No sure how long before they pull the program, but I have a 2 yr
    >>> contract!

    >>
    >>
    >> Rather than support this spammer, you COULD save on cell phone
    >> minutes as well as landline LD charges, at least when you're near a
    >> computer, by using Skype, which apparently now offers free unlimited
    >> calls to the US and Canada until the end of the year.
    >>
    >> THAT doesn't cost anything, except maybe the price of a good
    >> headset/mic.

    >
    > Not to mention the fact that the whole idea of doing VOIP over Vision
    > threatens the all-you-can-eat-for-one-price concept of Vision.
    >
    > If I were working for Sprint, I'd be looking into legal and technical
    > means to block VOIP over Vision. You can bet SPCS will do so as soon
    > as they notice any significant traffic cannibalizing their voice
    > minutes.
    > And if they can't figure out how to shut down VOIP over Vision, you
    > can be certain that they'll stop offering $10/month all-you-can-eat
    > IP and switch to per-byte tariffs.


    That's all fine and dandy. It also has NOTHING, despite the subject
    line, to do with the OP. The "trick" that was described in this thread
    involved using the phone for voice (i.e., a standard phone call) to call
    your "home" number. It had nothing to do with using "VOIP over Vision."

    Did you actually read the message?


    --
    Mike





  5. #5
    AZ Nomad
    Guest

    Re: Doing cheap VOIP on Sprint cell does work

    On Fri, 19 May 2006 05:35:29 GMT, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Not to mention the fact that the whole idea of doing VOIP over Vision
    >threatens the all-you-can-eat-for-one-price concept of Vision.


    >If I were working for Sprint, I'd be looking into legal and technical
    >means to block VOIP over Vision. You can bet SPCS will do so as soon as
    >they notice any significant traffic cannibalizing their voice minutes.


    >And if they can't figure out how to shut down VOIP over Vision, you can
    >be certain that they'll stop offering $10/month all-you-can-eat IP and
    >switch to per-byte tariffs.


    It's a moot point. Vision hasn't the bandwidth quality to handle VoIP.
    It frequently has zero bandwidth for periods up to 15 seconds.



  6. #6
    Joel Kolstad
    Guest

    Re: Doing cheap VOIP on Sprint cell does work

    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > Not to mention the fact that the whole idea of doing VOIP over Vision
    > threatens the all-you-can-eat-for-one-price concept of Vision.


    I suspect that Vision will evolve much like DSL & cable modems have... as well
    as "unlimited" call times, for that matter... "all-you-can-eat" on paper, but
    realistically after you hit a limit that statistically cuts out, say, 0.01% of
    accounts but, say, 10% of all data usage, such accounts will simply not be
    offered such plans in the future.

    Additionally, I suspect the very nature of data transfer over the cell-phone
    system (data always being a "2nd class" citizen to voice calls, hand-off
    between tower to tower, relatively low bandwidth available in the first place)
    are going to make "VOIP over Vision" a pretty lousy performer anyway.

    Detecting VOIP traffic is technically somewhat difficult, as the first thing
    the VOIP software guys will do (just like all the Internet Messaging clients
    to) would be to use HTTP for their data transfers. (In fact, IM clients can
    still only be easily policed because the IM clients have to "phone home" to
    centralized servers with well-known IPs to logon... it's probably easier for
    VOIP software to avoid this problem.)

    From a legal perspective, I suspect the problem if the difficulty in defining
    VOIP precisely. If it's still OK for me to transfer, e.g., data files
    containing recordings I've made over Vision, how do you single out VOIP?

    If I were Sprint and felt this was a problem, I'd probably just have the
    system introduce the occasional random 1/4 second latency addition every 10
    seconds or so... not a problem for, e.g., web browsing, reduces overall
    throughput negligibly, but would give many VOIP programs a fit.

    ---Joel Kolstad





  7. #7
    Newsguy
    Guest

    Re: Doing cheap VOIP on Sprint cell does work

    Why is it only one person actually read this first post?

    The original poster said NOTHING ABOUT DOING VOIP OVER SPRINT'S NETWORK!

    Learn to read english people.


    "Joel Kolstad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]
    >> Not to mention the fact that the whole idea of doing VOIP over Vision
    >> threatens the all-you-can-eat-for-one-price concept of Vision.

    >
    > I suspect that Vision will evolve much like DSL & cable modems have... as
    > well as "unlimited" call times, for that matter... "all-you-can-eat" on
    > paper, but realistically after you hit a limit that statistically cuts
    > out, say, 0.01% of accounts but, say, 10% of all data usage, such accounts
    > will simply not be offered such plans in the future.
    >
    > Additionally, I suspect the very nature of data transfer over the
    > cell-phone system (data always being a "2nd class" citizen to voice calls,
    > hand-off between tower to tower, relatively low bandwidth available in the
    > first place) are going to make "VOIP over Vision" a pretty lousy performer
    > anyway.
    >
    > Detecting VOIP traffic is technically somewhat difficult, as the first
    > thing the VOIP software guys will do (just like all the Internet Messaging
    > clients to) would be to use HTTP for their data transfers. (In fact, IM
    > clients can still only be easily policed because the IM clients have to
    > "phone home" to centralized servers with well-known IPs to logon... it's
    > probably easier for VOIP software to avoid this problem.)
    >
    > From a legal perspective, I suspect the problem if the difficulty in
    > defining VOIP precisely. If it's still OK for me to transfer, e.g., data
    > files containing recordings I've made over Vision, how do you single out
    > VOIP?
    >
    > If I were Sprint and felt this was a problem, I'd probably just have the
    > system introduce the occasional random 1/4 second latency addition every
    > 10 seconds or so... not a problem for, e.g., web browsing, reduces overall
    > throughput negligibly, but would give many VOIP programs a fit.
    >
    > ---Joel Kolstad
    >
    >






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