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  1. #1
    SMS
    Guest
    See "http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=3147"



    See More: "The answer to Radio Shack's rhetorical question on buying cell phones"




  2. #2
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: "The answer to Radio Shack's rhetorical question on buying cellphones"

    SMS wrote:
    > See "http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=3147"



    Hear hear!

    The problem with RadioShack is that they limit themselves to just two
    post-paid wireless carriers. If they truly made a commitment to offer
    at least the top four nationwide, and THEN if they managed to negotiate
    contracts with each carriers that brings them ALL in parallel in terms
    of what kinds of incentives and kickbacks RadioShack and its employees
    get for selling service, then I MIGHT consider RadioShack as a one-stop
    shop worth considering. They would of course also have to deal with the
    whole most-sales-droids-barely-know-how-to-breathe thing, and actually
    make sure they have some semblance of knowledge about what they're
    talking about.

    But, since this is clearly not going to happen, RadioShack really should
    never be considered authoritative on who to pick for wireless service.

    I do disagree with the article on one point though. The author suggests
    asking to borrow a friend's phone for the day. I seriously doubt a lot
    of people would say yes to that. Personally, my phone IS my phone, and
    I make and receive jsut about all of my calls on it. So while I have no
    problems at all with letting someone make a quick phone call in a pinch,
    I would be very wary about parting with my phone for a whole day.

    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.



  3. #3
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: "The answer to Radio Shack's rhetorical question on buying cellphones"

    Isaiah Beard wrote:
    > SMS wrote:
    >> See "http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=3147"

    >
    >
    > Hear hear!
    >
    > The problem with RadioShack is that they limit themselves to just two
    > post-paid wireless carriers.


    One of the reasons Verizon is doing so well in terms of margins, and
    Cingular is doing so poorly, is that Verizon sells a much higher
    percentage of their service through their own stores and e-commerce site
    (the other big reason is that Verizon's new additions are much more on
    the post-paid side than Cingular's. Even though Radio Shack would jump
    at the chance to get Verizon back, given their disastrous results with
    Cingular, Verizon would be even stingier than ever on the commissions
    and kickbacks now that they know that people shop by the carrier, more
    than they do by the retailer.

    > I do disagree with the article on one point though. The author suggests
    > asking to borrow a friend's phone for the day. I seriously doubt a lot
    > of people would say yes to that. Personally, my phone IS my phone, and
    > I make and receive jsut about all of my calls on it. So while I have no
    > problems at all with letting someone make a quick phone call in a pinch,
    > I would be very wary about parting with my phone for a whole day.


    It's a typical stupid statement by the author. In reality, the real test
    of a phone often comes months or years after you sign up for service,
    when you're out traveling somewhere. I appreciate Verizon when I'm in
    the Sierra's, out on the coast, or in the greenbelt, because the GSM
    carriers have much poorer coverage, if any.

    When I'm in the urban and suburban parts of the Bay Area, Cingular
    coverage is okay, though still not as good as Verizon. I was just in
    Pleasanton last weekend, and I always am amused that about two miles
    from Cingular's western regional headquarters, on Stoneridge, west of
    Santa Rita Road the coverage sucks over at all the new cluster homes
    that have been built out there. Maybe the residents don't want to allow
    any cell sites, but Verizon works fine out there.



  4. #4
    Jo
    Guest

    Re: "The answer to Radio Shack's rhetorical question on buying cell phones"

    Boo on that.

    At the risk of flying completely off the handle, if you're going to buy a
    phone and you're comparison shopping, well, you're on here, you have the
    internet, pull up the carriers' websites and GET THE INFORMATION DIRECTLY.
    The problem with Authorized Agents or Dealer Locations is that they are
    usually poorly informed, poorly trained, don't have the full array of
    equipment, and are 999 times out of a thousand more interested in selling
    you accessories with a big fat margin over one that won't blow your phone to
    bits (literally, I have stories). Do yourself a favor, drive out of your
    way, go to your carrier's corporate-owned store, and do business there.
    It's just better, trust me on this.

    As a consumer, you owe it to yourself to be well-educated about the products
    and services you are consuming. Anyone trying to sell you anything has an
    agenda--getting your money, so they can in turn get their commission. So if
    T-Mobile offers some big fat commission bonus for selling this phone or if
    US Cellular offers some big fat commission bonus for selling that feature,
    guess what? This is a GREAT phone! You'll love it! And you just have to
    have this feature to go with it, too. Carefully review the terms and
    conditions of service *and* the contract before you sign it--you may be
    unwittingly locking yourself into a rate plan that requires you to renew the
    contract every time you change it. Any business has the legal right to
    assume you have read every stitch of everything they've ever given you.
    Carefully review your coverage area, so when you're travelling, you know
    whether you're going to get that big fat roaming bill--or if you should call
    *611 and add Free to Roam so you have that 100 roaming minutes for emergency
    use or what-have-you. In a nutshell: READ EVERYTHING. Once you sign your
    name or dial that phone, you have accepted the Terms & Conditions intact and
    are at that point stuck with it, or stuck with an Early Disconnect Penalty.
    Alltel may indeed hope you love every minute, but if there's something you
    don't love and it's in the fine print and costs you a bazillion dollars
    because you didn't read the fine print, well, Alltel still loves you but
    you're payin' that there bill.

    Thus endeth my tirade.

    "Isaiah Beard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > SMS wrote:
    > > See "http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=3147"

    >
    >
    > Hear hear!
    >
    > The problem with RadioShack is that they limit themselves to just two
    > post-paid wireless carriers. If they truly made a commitment to offer
    > at least the top four nationwide, and THEN if they managed to negotiate
    > contracts with each carriers that brings them ALL in parallel in terms
    > of what kinds of incentives and kickbacks RadioShack and its employees
    > get for selling service, then I MIGHT consider RadioShack as a one-stop
    > shop worth considering. They would of course also have to deal with the
    > whole most-sales-droids-barely-know-how-to-breathe thing, and actually
    > make sure they have some semblance of knowledge about what they're
    > talking about.
    >
    > But, since this is clearly not going to happen, RadioShack really should
    > never be considered authoritative on who to pick for wireless service.
    >
    > I do disagree with the article on one point though. The author suggests
    > asking to borrow a friend's phone for the day. I seriously doubt a lot
    > of people would say yes to that. Personally, my phone IS my phone, and
    > I make and receive jsut about all of my calls on it. So while I have no
    > problems at all with letting someone make a quick phone call in a pinch,
    > I would be very wary about parting with my phone for a whole day.
    >
    > --
    > E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    > Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.






  5. #5
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: "The answer to Radio Shack's rhetorical question on buying cellphones"

    Jo wrote:
    > Boo on that.
    >
    > At the risk of flying completely off the handle, if you're going to buy a
    > phone and you're comparison shopping, well, you're on here, you have the
    > internet, pull up the carriers' websites and GET THE INFORMATION DIRECTLY.
    > The problem with Authorized Agents or Dealer Locations is that they are
    > usually poorly informed, poorly trained, don't have the full array of
    > equipment, and are 999 times out of a thousand more interested in selling
    > you accessories with a big fat margin over one that won't blow your phone to
    > bits (literally, I have stories).


    Actually, the carrier's own stores often sell the same low quality/high
    margin accessories, as opposed to the better quality OEM accessories.

    Unless you get these low-end accessories for free (i.e. Costco throws in
    a leather case, headset, and car charger for free), then you're better
    off getting only the phone at the store, and ordering genuine OEM
    accessories on-line. There is a big difference in quality, and you'll
    pay less than the stores selling the phone.



  6. #6
    Agent_C
    Guest

    Re: Re: "The answer to Radio Shack's rhetorical question on buying cell phones"

    On Tue, 15 Aug 2006 22:53:46 -0700, "Jo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The problem with Authorized Agents or Dealer Locations is that they are
    >usually poorly informed, poorly trained, don't have the full array of
    >equipment, and are 999 times out of a thousand more interested in selling
    >you accessories with a big fat margin over one that won't blow your phone to
    >bits (literally, I have stories).


    I do too… Including the dealer who told my friend he would pay the
    $200 early termination fee if he’d switch carriers… The $15 a month
    plan that turned out to be a $25 plan when the bill arrived. In both
    cases, the merchant denied making the statements. They’ll apparently
    *say* anything to make a sale without regard for the truth.

    In New York these ‘Authorized Dealers’ are typically really sleazy
    merchants (and often look the part), that I would *never* do business
    with.

    The sales reps in the Verizon corporate stores may not be the most
    well informed, but they don’t have a vested interested in ripping you
    off and I’ve never known them to be rude or arrogant.

    A_C




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