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  1. #1
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest
    I have had both Sprint and Verizon on a number of phones and the audio
    quality on Sprint definitely sounds better. I have other friends that have
    switched from Verizon to Sprint and can also substantiate this. Why does
    Sprint sound better? Verizon sounds kind of "tinny" compared to Sprint.
    Sprint is so good that you can hear a fly fart. They are both CDMA. Does
    Sprint use a different type of voice encoding? Does Verizon have any plans
    to improve their audio quality to equal that of Sprint?

    mij





    See More: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?




  2. #2
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > I have had both Sprint and Verizon on a number of phones and the audio
    > quality on Sprint definitely sounds better. I have other friends that have
    > switched from Verizon to Sprint and can also substantiate this. Why does
    > Sprint sound better? Verizon sounds kind of "tinny" compared to Sprint.


    Either a. you're imagining things, and your conviction is convincing
    your friends the imagine the same, or b. there are probably more people
    using the Verizon network, causing a slight degradation in voice quality
    due to heavy call loading.

    And let's not forget, people have different preferences for sound, and
    it's rare for two people to hear the same sound in exactly the same way.
    If everyone heard sound in an identical manner, then high end stereos
    wouldn't need to come with equalizers.

    > Sprint is so good that you can hear a fly fart.


    Unlikely. CDMA is geared to encode and transmit sound that takes on the
    characteristics of human speech. Most everything else, including fly
    farts, would be mostly filtered out.

    > They are both CDMA. Does
    > Sprint use a different type of voice encoding?


    Both carriers use EVRC.

    > Does Verizon have any plans
    > to improve their audio quality to equal that of Sprint?


    Do you have any plans to stop making such wildly speculative
    observations and asking these ridiculous questions?


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.



  3. #3
    DonR.
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    Probably more related to the phone you were using on each network and your
    personal preferences, rather than the network itself. In many areas, both
    are on 1900 Mhz, and in most areas Verizon is on 800Mhz. I know some may
    disagree, but I believe the 800 Mhz signal is a much richer sounding signal.
    I live in a 1900 Mhz area, and when I go to an 800 Mhz area, I really like
    the sound difference even with the same phone. All native Sprint coverage is
    1900 Mhz with much worse building penetration. Again, some engineers
    disagree with that statement, but that has been my experience for many
    years.

    "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I have had both Sprint and Verizon on a number of phones and the audio
    >quality on Sprint definitely sounds better. I have other friends that have
    >switched from Verizon to Sprint and can also substantiate this. Why does
    >Sprint sound better? Verizon sounds kind of "tinny" compared to Sprint.
    >Sprint is so good that you can hear a fly fart. They are both CDMA. Does
    >Sprint use a different type of voice encoding? Does Verizon have any plans
    >to improve their audio quality to equal that of Sprint?
    >
    > mij
    >






  4. #4
    Beavis
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "DonR." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I know some may
    > disagree, but I believe the 800 Mhz signal is a much richer sounding signal.


    As it's a digital signal, that's not possible. The "richness" of the
    sound is a function of the voice CODEC being used, and the bit rate.
    The carrier frequency makes no difference at all.



  5. #5
    DonR.
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    I know you say that, but I also know what I consistently hear. And I am a
    musician for over 40 years, and I have a good ear.
    I travel regularly between a 1900 area and an 800 area.

    "Beavis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "DonR." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I know some may
    >> disagree, but I believe the 800 Mhz signal is a much richer sounding
    >> signal.

    >
    > As it's a digital signal, that's not possible. The "richness" of the
    > sound is a function of the voice CODEC being used, and the bit rate.
    > The carrier frequency makes no difference at all.






  6. #6
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    I think the Beavis is write about that one.

    Shutup Buttmunch!!

    "Beavis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "DonR." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I know some may
    >> disagree, but I believe the 800 Mhz signal is a much richer sounding
    >> signal.

    >
    > As it's a digital signal, that's not possible. The "richness" of the
    > sound is a function of the voice CODEC being used, and the bit rate.
    > The carrier frequency makes no difference at all.






  7. #7
    Der.MEROVINGIAN
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    On 2006-07-29 21:42:55 -0400, "DonR." <[email protected]> said:

    > I know you say that, but I also know what I consistently hear. And I am
    > a musician for over 40 years, and I have a good ear.
    > I travel regularly between a 1900 area and an 800 area.
    >
    > "Beavis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> "DonR." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I know some may
    >>> disagree, but I believe the 800 Mhz signal is a much richer sounding signal.

    >>
    >> As it's a digital signal, that's not possible. The "richness" of the
    >> sound is a function of the voice CODEC being used, and the bit rate.
    >> The carrier frequency makes no difference at all.


    "And I am a musician for over 40 years, and i have a good ear."

    All the more reason for your hearing to be suspect, don't you think...irony.




  8. #8
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    Yup, most musicians that I know can't hear.

    "Der.MEROVINGIAN" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2006-07-29 21:42:55 -0400, "DonR." <[email protected]> said:
    >
    >> I know you say that, but I also know what I consistently hear. And I am a
    >> musician for over 40 years, and I have a good ear.
    >> I travel regularly between a 1900 area and an 800 area.
    >>
    >> "Beavis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> "DonR." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I know some may
    >>>> disagree, but I believe the 800 Mhz signal is a much richer sounding
    >>>> signal.
    >>>
    >>> As it's a digital signal, that's not possible. The "richness" of the
    >>> sound is a function of the voice CODEC being used, and the bit rate.
    >>> The carrier frequency makes no difference at all.

    >
    > "And I am a musician for over 40 years, and i have a good ear."
    >
    > All the more reason for your hearing to be suspect, don't you
    > think...irony.
    >






  9. #9

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 18:19:53 GMT, "DonR."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >are on 1900 Mhz, and in most areas Verizon is on 800Mhz.

    That might well be the difference.

    At 1900 the sampling rate could be higher, resulting in less aliasing
    caused by the nyquist limit.

    It doesn't have to be higher, and they would be able to adjust it
    lower resulting in more data loss and a more distorted sound quality
    if necessary to keep the network working. It's just standards the
    carrier can apply, lower standards for sound quality=more calls
    carried on the available bandwidth. Higher standards, better sound
    quality.

    Yee haa.



  10. #10
    Jim Seymour
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "DonR." <[email protected]> writes:
    > I know you say that, but I also know what I consistently hear.

    [snip]

    Sorry, it ain't happenin'. As Beavis wrote: Digital is digital.
    There are 1's and there are 0's. There is no in-between. There are
    no subtleties or nuances. It matters not a whit what frequency band
    the digital signal's on.

    And no: A high-end replacement power cord will not improve the
    transparency of the highs. Not on your cell phone and not on your
    sound system.

    --
    Jim Seymour | "There is no expedient to which a man will not
    [email protected] | go to avoid the labor of thinking."
    http://jimsun.LinxNet.com | - Thomas A. Edison



  11. #11
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?


    "Jim Seymour" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "DonR." <[email protected]> writes:
    >> I know you say that, but I also know what I consistently hear.

    > [snip]
    >
    > Sorry, it ain't happenin'. As Beavis wrote: Digital is digital.
    > There are 1's and there are 0's. There is no in-between. There are
    > no subtleties or nuances. It matters not a whit what frequency band
    > the digital signal's on.


    But how the sound is converted to 1's and 0's will impact how it sounds on
    the other end. Sampling rate could be higher, microphone could be more
    sensitive or having a wider frequency sensitivity, error correction is
    better or not as necessary at all due to smaller data loss, data compression
    rates could be different. All of the above can noticeably affect the
    quality of a sound file.

    Not all digital sound files are created equal. Don't believe it? Rip a
    song of your choice into an .mp3 at a sampling rate of 48kbps, rip the same
    song at 256kbps and then compare the sound quality between the two. Those
    that can't hear the noticeable difference are the ones with hearing
    problems.







  12. #12
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    In alt.cellular.verizon Mij Adyaw <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have had both Sprint and Verizon on a number of phones and the audio
    > quality on Sprint definitely sounds better. I have other friends that have
    > switched from Verizon to Sprint and can also substantiate this. Why does
    > Sprint sound better? Verizon sounds kind of "tinny" compared to Sprint.
    > Sprint is so good that you can hear a fly fart. They are both CDMA. Does
    > Sprint use a different type of voice encoding? Does Verizon have any plans
    > to improve their audio quality to equal that of Sprint?
    >


    I picked up my Sister's VX8300 and it sounds just as good as my Sanyo 7400,
    which sounds as good as any Sprint PCS phone that I have had. What phone are
    you complaining about with Verizon?

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1





  13. #13
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    In alt.cellular.verizon Mij Adyaw <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Yup, most musicians that I know can't hear.
    >


    Most that I know can't hear either. I must say ... lucky for them ;-)

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1





  14. #14
    Beavis
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Sorry, it ain't happenin'. As Beavis wrote: Digital is digital.
    > > There are 1's and there are 0's. There is no in-between.


    >
    > But how the sound is converted to 1's and 0's will impact how it sounds on
    > the other end. Sampling rate could be higher, microphone could be more
    > sensitive or having a wider frequency sensitivity, error correction is
    > better or not as necessary at all due to smaller data loss, data compression
    > rates could be different. All of the above can noticeably affect the
    > quality of a sound file.


    All of that is absolutely right. But none of that has anything to do
    with the carrier frequency of the signal being encoded and decoded.
    It's still a stream of ones and zeroes.

    > Not all digital sound files are created equal. Don't believe it? Rip a
    > song of your choice into an .mp3 at a sampling rate of 48kbps, rip the same
    > song at 256kbps and then compare the sound quality between the two.


    Here's a more relevant example:

    Take that 256kb file, and e-mail it to a friend twice -- once using a
    cable modem, and once using Verizon's spiffy new FIOS internet.

    Which one's going to sound better?

    If you answered, "They'll both sound the same, because they're encoded
    at the same bit rate," you'd be right. The situation is the same with
    1900MHz vs. 850MHz carriers, both carrying the same stream of ones and
    zeroes.



  15. #15
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Why does Sprint sound better than Verizon?

    "Beavis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >
    > Take that 256kb file, and e-mail it to a friend twice -- once using a
    > cable modem, and once using Verizon's spiffy new FIOS internet.
    >
    > Which one's going to sound better?
    >
    > If you answered, "They'll both sound the same, because they're encoded
    > at the same bit rate," you'd be right. The situation is the same with
    > 1900MHz vs. 850MHz carriers, both carrying the same stream of ones and
    > zeroes.


    You are taking for granted that the 850MHz signal uses the exact same
    encoding/decoding algorithm as the 1900MHz signal. Although that is
    likely to be the case, it isn't necessarily so.

    --
    John Richards



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