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  1. #1
    John Navas
    Guest
    <http://www.theregister.com/2006/08/10/blackjack_hack_attack/>

    A hacking program, due to be released next week, will demonstrate how
    to use a connection from BlackBerry devices to potentially bypass
    enterprise security defences.

    Jesse D'Aguanno, director of security research at German firm
    Praetorian Global, gave a presentation on how to use the BlackBerry
    environment to circumvent perimeter defenses and directly attack
    hosts on a corporate intranet at last week's DefCon conference in
    Vegas. The demo included a live presentation. Next week D'Aguanno
    plans to release source code for BBProxy, the tool used to conduct
    the attack, which he describes as "Blackjacking".

    [MORE]

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



    See More: NEWS: BlackBerry hacking peril exposed




  2. #2
    John Navas
    Guest

    NEWS: Cellcos face challenge from satellite, cable cos in AWS auction

    <http://www.theregister.com/2006/08/10/aws_auction/>

    One of the US's largest ever spectrum auctions kicks off this week, with
    168 companies listed as applicants for a share of the AWS (Advanced
    Wireless Spectrum) band, which could support 3G or other broadband
    wireless services.

    Auction 66 is for 1,122 regional licenses in the 1710-1755MHz and
    2110-2155MHz bands. The seemingly endless and often highly technical
    bickering over the rules for bidding have finally been resolved, but
    continue to be at the forefront of discussions, as the FCC regulator
    starts to consider how far it needs to change a creaking system in time
    for the auctions of even more desirable former analog TV spectrum in
    700MHz, due to take place in early 2008.
    The bidders

    The level of upfront payments is certainly a strong sign of interest and
    commitment and reveals the likely major bidders - and so the likely big
    winners. The top 10 bidders alone put up almost $4bn in deposits:

    1. DirecTV/Echostar/Liberty, $972m
    2. Sprint-Cable Co joint venture, $637m
    3. T-Mobile USA, $583m
    4. Cingular Wireless, $500m
    5. Verizon Wireless, $383m
    6. Leap Wireless, $255m
    7. MetroPCS, $200m
    8. Cablevision, $149m
    9. Nextwave Broadband, $142m
    10. US Cellular, $80m

    Gone are the days when the cellular operators largely had to bid against
    each other - often through smaller regional proxies - for valuable
    mobile-suited bandwidth. Now they are facing competition from cable and
    satellite TV firms and many non-traditional operators, encouraged by the
    US technology neutral approach.

    [MORE]

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  3. #3
    John Navas
    Guest

    NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    <http://www.theregister.com/2006/08/10/sprint_wimax_decision/>

    Major victory for Motorola and Samsung

    So there really is going to be an honest to goodness broadband
    wireless WiMAX network in the US, with tons of spectrum and an
    national reach, thanks to Sprintís decision, leaked earlier yesterday
    that it will use the fledgling technology for an all purpose US wide
    network costing $4.5bn.

    The decision is a body blow to Qualcomm, which has its incumbent
    Sprint CDMA mobile network revenues to lose, and which was bidding
    the Flarion Flash OFDM, from the company it acquired last August.

    But for Motorola, at risk with something like 18 per cent of its
    revenues coming from Sprint Nextelís IDEN mobile network, it is a
    major victory, landing the biggest network equipment contract for
    WiMAX that has ever been placed.

    Motorola will also be asked to come up with brand new mobile handsets
    for the WiMAX network, as will Samsung. These are likely to be highly
    multimedia capable, dual mode, CDMA WiMAX handsets to enable roaming
    and a gradual transition to WiMAX from the existing Sprint CDMA
    network.

    [MORE]

    Coming on the heels of Nokia's decision to abandon the "shrinking"
    CDMA2000 market, this is more bad news for the future of CDMA2000, with
    Verizon as the only remaining major player.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  4. #4
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 17:13:35 GMT, John Navas
    <[email protected]> wrote in
    <[email protected]>:

    ><http://www.theregister.com/2006/08/10/sprint_wimax_decision/>
    >
    > Major victory for Motorola and Samsung
    >
    > So there really is going to be an honest to goodness broadband
    > wireless WiMAX network in the US, with tons of spectrum and an
    > national reach, thanks to Sprintís decision, leaked earlier yesterday
    > that it will use the fledgling technology for an all purpose US wide
    > network costing $4.5bn.
    >
    > The decision is a body blow to Qualcomm, which has its incumbent
    > Sprint CDMA mobile network revenues to lose, and which was bidding
    > the Flarion Flash OFDM, from the company it acquired last August.
    >
    > But for Motorola, at risk with something like 18 per cent of its
    > revenues coming from Sprint Nextelís IDEN mobile network, it is a
    > major victory, landing the biggest network equipment contract for
    > WiMAX that has ever been placed.
    >
    > Motorola will also be asked to come up with brand new mobile handsets
    > for the WiMAX network, as will Samsung. These are likely to be highly
    > multimedia capable, dual mode, CDMA WiMAX handsets to enable roaming
    > and a gradual transition to WiMAX from the existing Sprint CDMA
    > network.
    >
    > [MORE]


    ...

    The service will compete as a full quadruple play, driving US
    broadband, telephony, data service and both fixed and mobile voice
    pricing down.

    The beauty of WiMAX is that it can be built out as customers emerge
    that buy into it. For instance, a base station can be installed, and
    customers can emerge from unexpected locations and still be serviced
    because the system is a point to multi-point radio service.

    ...

    Whatever happens, something like 40 to 50 MHz of spectrum could be
    made over to video services and that could provide something like 200
    mobile TV channels.

    However, Sprint is known to be interested in offering full screen TV
    across the network, to extend the reach of the cable operators, and
    it wouldnít be a big surprise if the network had something like 20 to
    30 channels of full screen TV broadcast on it, as well as 50 channels
    of mobile TV as well, and that should all fit comfortably into the
    Sprint spectrum and still leave plenty over to offer advanced data
    services, voice communications and roaming internet access.

    Whatever happens, this contract will put WiMAX on the map and secure
    its future globally, it will drive a stake into the heart of the
    moribund US telcos and it will catapult Motorola into the top flight
    of network equipment makers.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com>
    John Navas FAQ for Wi-Fi: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi>
    Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_HowTo>
    Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes>



  5. #5
    Agent_C
    Guest

    Re: Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 17:18:16 GMT, John Navas
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Whatever happens, something like 40 to 50 MHz of spectrum could be
    > made over to video services and that could provide something like 200
    > mobile TV channels.


    Just what America needs... More TV channels.

    No we can sit around and get fat in more places.

    A_C



  6. #6
    Kurt Ullman
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Agent_C <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 17:18:16 GMT, John Navas
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Whatever happens, something like 40 to 50 MHz of spectrum could be
    > > made over to video services and that could provide something like 200
    > > mobile TV channels.

    >
    > Just what America needs... More TV channels.
    >
    > No we can sit around and get fat in more places.
    >
    > A_C


    Some people will never have leave the McD's ever again...



  7. #7
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 20:12:14 GMT, Kurt Ullman <[email protected]>
    wrote in
    <[email protected].net.mx>:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Agent_C <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 17:18:16 GMT, John Navas
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Whatever happens, something like 40 to 50 MHz of spectrum could be
    >> > made over to video services and that could provide something like 200
    >> > mobile TV channels.

    >>
    >> Just what America needs... More TV channels.
    >>
    >> No we can sit around and get fat in more places.


    > Some people will never have leave the McD's ever again...


    I agree in general -- I don't even have regular TV service -- but it's
    good to have more delivery choices. There are a (very) few shows I like
    (e.g., Deadwood), and it would be nice to be able to view them on demand
    wherever I might happen to be; e.g., sitting comfortably on a sailboat
    anchored in (say) Ayala Cove, Paradise Cove, Stillwater Cove, or even
    Fort Ross Cove.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  8. #8
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    In alt.cellular.sprintpcs John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I agree in general -- I don't even have regular TV service -- but it's
    > good to have more delivery choices. There are a (very) few shows I like
    > (e.g., Deadwood), and it would be nice to be able to view them on demand
    > wherever I might happen to be; e.g., sitting comfortably on a sailboat
    > anchored in (say) Ayala Cove, Paradise Cove, Stillwater Cove, or even
    > Fort Ross Cove.
    >


    Pocket Dish would fit the bill nicely. Pairs up well with a DVR.

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1





  9. #9
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 20:28:11 GMT, "Thomas T. Veldhouse"
    <[email protected]> wrote in
    <[email protected]>:

    >In alt.cellular.sprintpcs John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I agree in general -- I don't even have regular TV service -- but it's
    >> good to have more delivery choices. There are a (very) few shows I like
    >> (e.g., Deadwood), and it would be nice to be able to view them on demand
    >> wherever I might happen to be; e.g., sitting comfortably on a sailboat
    >> anchored in (say) Ayala Cove, Paradise Cove, Stillwater Cove, or even
    >> Fort Ross Cove.

    >
    >Pocket Dish would fit the bill nicely. Pairs up well with a DVR.


    Or iPod video. Thanks for the suggestion, but I'm talking real-time,
    not pre-recorded and after the fact -- we've already got portable DVD
    players for that (and the means to create our own discs). For example,
    we'd have loved to get World Cup soccer on TV while sailing, but were
    out of TV range, and had to settle for radio. Watching it the following
    weekend just wouldn't have been the same.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  10. #10
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    In alt.cellular.sprintpcs John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 20:28:11 GMT, "Thomas T. Veldhouse"
    > <[email protected]> wrote in
    > <[email protected]>:
    >
    >>In alt.cellular.sprintpcs John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I agree in general -- I don't even have regular TV service -- but it's
    >>> good to have more delivery choices. There are a (very) few shows I like
    >>> (e.g., Deadwood), and it would be nice to be able to view them on demand
    >>> wherever I might happen to be; e.g., sitting comfortably on a sailboat
    >>> anchored in (say) Ayala Cove, Paradise Cove, Stillwater Cove, or even
    >>> Fort Ross Cove.

    >>
    >>Pocket Dish would fit the bill nicely. Pairs up well with a DVR.

    >
    > Or iPod video. Thanks for the suggestion, but I'm talking real-time,
    > not pre-recorded and after the fact -- we've already got portable DVD
    > players for that (and the means to create our own discs). For example,
    > we'd have loved to get World Cup soccer on TV while sailing, but were
    > out of TV range, and had to settle for radio. Watching it the following
    > weekend just wouldn't have been the same.
    >


    To my knowledge you don't get any real-time video from any provider. But what
    you said was "Deadwood", which is perfectly suitable for PocketDish.

    --
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1





  11. #11
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 12:46:07 GMT, "Thomas T. Veldhouse"
    <[email protected]> wrote in
    <[email protected]>:

    >In alt.cellular.sprintpcs John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 20:28:11 GMT, "Thomas T. Veldhouse"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> <[email protected]>:
    >>
    >>>In alt.cellular.sprintpcs John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> I agree in general -- I don't even have regular TV service -- but it's
    >>>> good to have more delivery choices. There are a (very) few shows I like
    >>>> (e.g., Deadwood), and it would be nice to be able to view them on demand
    >>>> wherever I might happen to be; e.g., sitting comfortably on a sailboat
    >>>> anchored in (say) Ayala Cove, Paradise Cove, Stillwater Cove, or even
    >>>> Fort Ross Cove.
    >>>
    >>>Pocket Dish would fit the bill nicely. Pairs up well with a DVR.

    >>
    >> Or iPod video. Thanks for the suggestion, but I'm talking real-time,
    >> not pre-recorded and after the fact -- we've already got portable DVD
    >> players for that (and the means to create our own discs). For example,
    >> we'd have loved to get World Cup soccer on TV while sailing, but were
    >> out of TV range, and had to settle for radio. Watching it the following
    >> weekend just wouldn't have been the same.

    >
    >To my knowledge you don't get any real-time video from any provider. ...


    This thread is about real-time video over WiMAX.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  12. #12

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    In alt.internet.wireless John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:

    | Whatever happens, something like 40 to 50 MHz of spectrum could be
    | made over to video services and that could provide something like 200
    | mobile TV channels.

    Good thing they are not expecting high definition on these mobile devices.
    But 200 to 250 kHz per channel could easily do standard definition with
    advanced compression technology. Or they coould back down things that
    mobile users tend not to need, like cutting the frame rate in half. And
    much of this depends on power levels and noise levels. Given enough power
    (which is a form of redundancy) you can get lots of bandwidth into a given
    fixed spectrum. But there isn't a lot of power hitting the antenna of a
    mobile user when the transmitter is 10 miles away. How many megawatts
    would these WiMAX transmitters be allowed to operate at?


    | However, Sprint is known to be interested in offering full screen TV
    | across the network, to extend the reach of the cable operators, and
    | it wouldn?t be a big surprise if the network had something like 20 to
    | 30 channels of full screen TV broadcast on it, as well as 50 channels
    | of mobile TV as well, and that should all fit comfortably into the
    | Sprint spectrum and still leave plenty over to offer advanced data
    | services, voice communications and roaming internet access.

    What do you mean by full screen? 480i30 or 1080p60?


    | Whatever happens, this contract will put WiMAX on the map and secure
    | its future globally, it will drive a stake into the heart of the
    | moribund US telcos and it will catapult Motorola into the top flight
    | of network equipment makers.

    I do look forward to that. I'm still concerned that it will just become
    another content controller ("sorry, if you want that channel you will have
    to subscribe to tier II and tier II first even though they are full of
    channels you have no interest in").

    In the arena of TV broadcast, cable and satellite providers are still
    locking themselves out of a lot of sales because of their tiered sales
    structure. And broadcast (free OTA) TV? All but PBS is junk now days,
    and even PBS is migrating to junk more and more (I've quit donating to
    them because of that).

    To the extent WiMAX will provide voluntary net-neutrality access and
    ala-carte programming, I think it could really tear into all the other
    markets.

    --
    |---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
    | Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
    | first name lower case at ipal.net / [email protected] |
    |------------------------------------/-------------------------------------|



  13. #13
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    [email protected] wrote:
    > In alt.internet.wireless John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > | Whatever happens, something like 40 to 50 MHz of spectrum could be
    > | made over to video services and that could provide something like 200
    > | mobile TV channels.
    >
    > Good thing they are not expecting high definition on these mobile devices.
    > But 200 to 250 kHz per channel could easily do standard definition with
    > advanced compression technology. Or they coould back down things that
    > mobile users tend not to need, like cutting the frame rate in half. And
    > much of this depends on power levels and noise levels. Given enough power
    > (which is a form of redundancy) you can get lots of bandwidth into a given
    > fixed spectrum. But there isn't a lot of power hitting the antenna of a
    > mobile user when the transmitter is 10 miles away. How many megawatts
    > would these WiMAX transmitters be allowed to operate at?
    >
    >
    > | However, Sprint is known to be interested in offering full screen TV
    > | across the network, to extend the reach of the cable operators, and
    > | it wouldn?t be a big surprise if the network had something like 20 to
    > | 30 channels of full screen TV broadcast on it, as well as 50 channels
    > | of mobile TV as well, and that should all fit comfortably into the
    > | Sprint spectrum and still leave plenty over to offer advanced data
    > | services, voice communications and roaming internet access.
    >
    > What do you mean by full screen? 480i30 or 1080p60?
    >
    >
    > | Whatever happens, this contract will put WiMAX on the map and secure
    > | its future globally, it will drive a stake into the heart of the
    > | moribund US telcos and it will catapult Motorola into the top flight
    > | of network equipment makers.
    >
    > I do look forward to that. I'm still concerned that it will just become
    > another content controller ("sorry, if you want that channel you will have
    > to subscribe to tier II and tier II first even though they are full of
    > channels you have no interest in").
    >
    > In the arena of TV broadcast, cable and satellite providers are still
    > locking themselves out of a lot of sales because of their tiered sales
    > structure. And broadcast (free OTA) TV? All but PBS is junk now days,
    > and even PBS is migrating to junk more and more (I've quit donating to
    > them because of that).


    That's a shame, and more than likely why their lineups are shifting.

    >
    > To the extent WiMAX will provide voluntary net-neutrality access and
    > ala-carte programming, I think it could really tear into all the other
    > markets.
    >



    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'



  14. #14
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 18:00:22 -0500, Jer <[email protected]> wrote in
    <[email protected]>:

    >[email protected] wrote:


    >> In the arena of TV broadcast, cable and satellite providers are still
    >> locking themselves out of a lot of sales because of their tiered sales
    >> structure. And broadcast (free OTA) TV? All but PBS is junk now days,
    >> and even PBS is migrating to junk more and more (I've quit donating to
    >> them because of that).

    >
    >That's a shame, and more than likely why their lineups are shifting.


    Not really -- PBS chose the dark side, running commercials, and dumbing
    down programming. While there is still much to like on PBS, it's no
    longer "public" broadcasting and I likewise no longer contribute for
    that reason, although I do still volunteer for the pledge drives.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  15. #15
    Jer
    Guest

    Re: NEWS: Sprint says yes to US-wide WiMAX network

    John Navas wrote:
    > On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 18:00:22 -0500, Jer <[email protected]> wrote in
    > <[email protected]>:
    >
    >
    >>[email protected] wrote:

    >
    >
    >>>In the arena of TV broadcast, cable and satellite providers are still
    >>>locking themselves out of a lot of sales because of their tiered sales
    >>>structure. And broadcast (free OTA) TV? All but PBS is junk now days,
    >>>and even PBS is migrating to junk more and more (I've quit donating to
    >>>them because of that).

    >>
    >>That's a shame, and more than likely why their lineups are shifting.

    >
    >
    > Not really -- PBS chose the dark side, running commercials, and dumbing
    > down programming. While there is still much to like on PBS, it's no
    > longer "public" broadcasting and I likewise no longer contribute for
    > that reason, although I do still volunteer for the pledge drives.
    >


    I'm not always happy with what PBS does either, but PBS is still a world
    apart from their commercial brethren. I continue my support so I can
    continue trying to make a difference where I think a difference is
    warranted.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'




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