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  1. #1
    SMS
    Guest
    [email protected] wrote:
    > Cingular ranks low, and identical to JD Power rankings earlier this
    > year, SprintPCS ranks lower.
    >
    > http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/busine...lphones05.html


    It wasn't a customer service survey, it's their annual survey of carriers.

    While it's not surprising that Verizon ranked first in 14 out of 20
    areas, and second in the rest, I'm surprised that T-Mobile beat them in
    three cities. No doubt T-Mobile's policy of discouraging new sign-ups
    for people with no coverage at their home and work locations plays a
    part in their good ratings. Alltel has always been a good carrier in the
    cities that it serves, and it does well in roaming because it's CDMA.

    As I predicted, Verizon did decline in their ratings over last year. In
    last year's survey, Verizon was top-rated in 17 out of 18 metro areas,
    this year it's only 14 out of 20, with a tie in a 15th area.

    In some cities the differences are small, only one or two points
    difference, but in many the differences were significant, i.e. Alltel
    and Verizon were 14 points ahead of Cingular in Phoenix. Verizon
    continues to be the best carrier in the San Francisco Bay Area by a wide
    margin, with the three other carriers tied for 2nd through 4th, seven
    points behind Verizon. This result echoes the experiences of all the
    users I know personally, though some have chosen Cingular because they
    want to roam internationally with their U.S. number.

    It's pretty amusing that Consumer Reports joined the chorus in
    criticizing Cingular's "fewest dropped calls" ads, since it's
    demonstrably untrue, only Sprint had any cities with more dropped call
    than Cingular, with Verizon and T-Mobile having the fewest dropped calls.



    See More: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service




  2. #2
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    On Tue, 05 Dec 2006 17:00:50 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
    wrote in <[email protected]>:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> Cingular ranks low, and identical to JD Power rankings earlier this
    >> year, SprintPCS ranks lower.
    >>
    >> http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/busine...lphones05.html

    >
    >It wasn't a customer service survey, it's their annual survey of carriers.
    >
    >While it's not surprising that Verizon ranked first in 14 out of 20
    >areas, and second in the rest, I'm surprised that T-Mobile beat them in
    >three cities. No doubt T-Mobile's policy of discouraging new sign-ups
    >for people with no coverage at their home and work locations plays a
    >part in their good ratings. Alltel has always been a good carrier in the
    >cities that it serves, and it does well in roaming because it's CDMA.
    >
    >As I predicted, Verizon did decline in their ratings over last year. In
    >last year's survey, Verizon was top-rated in 17 out of 18 metro areas,
    >this year it's only 14 out of 20, with a tie in a 15th area.
    >
    >In some cities the differences are small, only one or two points
    >difference, but in many the differences were significant, i.e. Alltel
    >and Verizon were 14 points ahead of Cingular in Phoenix. Verizon
    >continues to be the best carrier in the San Francisco Bay Area by a wide
    >margin, with the three other carriers tied for 2nd through 4th, seven
    >points behind Verizon. This result echoes the experiences of all the
    >users I know personally, though some have chosen Cingular because they
    >want to roam internationally with their U.S. number.


    Cingular actually has excellent coverage in the Bay Area. Verizon is
    demonstrably worse in a number of areas.

    Stop trolling here. Take your Verizon advocacy to more appropriate
    forums.

    >It's pretty amusing that Consumer Reports joined the chorus in
    >criticizing Cingular's "fewest dropped calls" ads, since it's
    >demonstrably untrue, only Sprint had any cities with more dropped call
    >than Cingular, with Verizon and T-Mobile having the fewest dropped calls.


    The Cingular claim hasn't been challenged successfully.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  3. #3

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    Sprint dedicated $7 billion to network enhancements in 2006.
    Sprint is investing more than $2 billion into the Nextel National
    Network and adding more than 1,600 new cell sites to expand
    coverage and increase capacity across the country.
    Sprint leads the industry in mobile broadband coverage and
    rollout of EVDO and EVDO Rev A. By the fourth quarter of 2007,
    Sprints entire mobile broadband network will be upgraded to
    EV-DO Revision A. Once the network is upgraded, Sprint will
    also expect to begin offering in early 2008 high performance
    walkie-talkie services over the EV-DO Revision A network.
    Don't forget 4G, Sprint's planned buildout of the 4G WiMAX
    network will be the standard for future mobility products and services.



    The hallmark of Sprint Nextel is innovation.
    Sprint's ranked #1 in the telecommunications industry in the
    area of innovation in the FORTUNEs 2006 Most Admired Companies list.
    Sprint Nextels impressive portfolio of assets includes a
    high-speed data network, Sprint Power Vision, which empowers
    customers to do what they want, when they want it, where
    they want it. Sprint was the first carrier to offer live TV and
    today we offer more than more than 50 video channels that
    feature live and on-demand programming.

    Popular price plans are available to Sprint customers to help
    prevent them from paying high overage charges
    and paying for minutes they do not use. Nights start at 7 p.m., This
    gives customers two more hours of free calling. Sprint also offers
    plans with Free Incoming Calls - in which calls from any of the
    networks are free. Another item other co's don't offer.
    We Have Saved The Best for Last = Upgrade Fees Eliminated:
    Sprint recently eliminated device upgrade fees for existing customers
    when they purchase a new device either through telesales or
    online at www.sprint.com

    ---All Fact!!!




  4. #4
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    The big, really big, question is whether or not Sprint can pull all this
    off. The technical, financial, and business risks are truly huge. Thus
    far this is mostly vaporware, with Sprint mostly selling the Same Old
    Stuff (including iDEN). Only time will tell. But I wouldn't want to be
    a shareholder.

    On 5 Dec 2006 17:23:27 -0800, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote in
    <[email protected]>:

    >Sprint dedicated $7 billion to network enhancements in 2006.
    >Sprint is investing more than $2 billion into the Nextel National
    >Network and adding more than 1,600 new cell sites to expand
    >coverage and increase capacity across the country.
    >Sprint leads the industry in mobile broadband coverage and
    >rollout of EVDO and EVDO Rev A. By the fourth quarter of 2007,
    >Sprints entire mobile broadband network will be upgraded to
    >EV-DO Revision A. Once the network is upgraded, Sprint will
    >also expect to begin offering in early 2008 high performance
    >walkie-talkie services over the EV-DO Revision A network.
    >Don't forget 4G, Sprint's planned buildout of the 4G WiMAX
    >network will be the standard for future mobility products and services.
    >
    >The hallmark of Sprint Nextel is innovation.
    >Sprint's ranked #1 in the telecommunications industry in the
    >area of innovation in the FORTUNEs 2006 Most Admired Companies list.
    >Sprint Nextels impressive portfolio of assets includes a
    >high-speed data network, Sprint Power Vision, which empowers
    >customers to do what they want, when they want it, where
    >they want it. Sprint was the first carrier to offer live TV and
    >today we offer more than more than 50 video channels that
    >feature live and on-demand programming.
    >
    >Popular price plans are available to Sprint customers to help
    >prevent them from paying high overage charges
    >and paying for minutes they do not use. Nights start at 7 p.m., This
    >gives customers two more hours of free calling. Sprint also offers
    >plans with Free Incoming Calls - in which calls from any of the
    >networks are free. Another item other co's don't offer.
    >We Have Saved The Best for Last = Upgrade Fees Eliminated:
    >Sprint recently eliminated device upgrade fees for existing customers
    >when they purchase a new device either through telesales or
    >online at www.sprint.com
    >
    >---All Fact!!!


    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  5. #5

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service


    John Navas wrote:
    > The big, really big, question is whether or not Sprint can pull all this
    > off. The technical, financial, and business risks are truly huge. Thus
    > far this is mostly vaporware, with Sprint mostly selling the Same Old
    > Stuff (including iDEN). Only time will tell. But I wouldn't want to be
    > a shareholder.
    >



    Exactly what I think, that is why I truly believe in my thread of R&D

    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.c...c475110b94cfa9

    Down the road the Money will have to come from somewhere, Will it be
    T-Mobile?




  6. #6
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Popular price plans are available to Sprint customers to help
    > prevent them from paying high overage charges
    > and paying for minutes they do not use. Nights start at 7 p.m., This
    > gives customers two more hours of free calling. Sprint also offers
    > plans with Free Incoming Calls - in which calls from any of the
    > networks are free. Another item other co's don't offer.
    > We Have Saved The Best for Last = Upgrade Fees Eliminated:
    > Sprint recently eliminated device upgrade fees for existing customers
    > when they purchase a new device either through telesales or
    > online at www.sprint.com
    >
    > ---All Fact!!!


    Maybe so, but Sprint is still hemorrhaging customers with their high
    churn and fewer additions. Poor handset selection is one reason for
    their troubles.

    Rumor is that Comcast is interested in Sprint, in order to compete
    against package deals from AT&T.



  7. #7

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service


    > Poor handset selection is one reason for their troubles.
    >


    Soon that will be a thing of the past;

    http://www.phonescoop.com/phones/zoom.php?p=1078&g=2

    http://www.phonescoop.com/phones/phone.php?p=953

    :-) Happy Holidays.




  8. #8
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue, 05 Dec 2006 17:00:50 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
    > wrote in <[email protected]>:
    >


    >
    >>It's pretty amusing that Consumer Reports joined the chorus in
    >>criticizing Cingular's "fewest dropped calls" ads, since it's
    >>demonstrably untrue, only Sprint had any cities with more dropped call
    >>than Cingular, with Verizon and T-Mobile having the fewest dropped
    >>calls.

    >
    > The Cingular claim hasn't been challenged successfully.
    >


    It would appear that the Consumer Reports report did just that, Novice.



  9. #9
    Scott
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > The big, really big, question is whether or not Sprint can pull all this
    > off. The technical, financial, and business risks are truly huge. Thus
    > far this is mostly vaporware, with Sprint mostly selling the Same Old
    > Stuff (including iDEN). Only time will tell. But I wouldn't want to be
    > a shareholder.
    >


    There you have it, folks- financial analysis by the Cingular kool aid
    supplier himself.

    I particularly like the "mostly vaporware" portion of the post. Would that
    include the new EVDO rev A data network they are currently rolling out and
    iDen PTT, which both kick the crap out of Cingular in terms of users and
    performance? Or maybe it refers to the successful integration of iDen and
    CDMA platforms in a single device, already rolled out in 24 markets?

    The only vapor involved in this thread is that which occupies the space
    between your ears.



  10. #10
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    At 05 Dec 2006 17:00:50 -0800 SMS wrote:

    > While it's not surprising that Verizon ranked first in 14 out of 20
    > areas, and second in the rest, I'm surprised that T-Mobile beat them in
    > three cities. No doubt T-Mobile's policy of discouraging new sign-ups
    > for
    > people with no coverage at their home and work locations plays a part in
    > their good ratings.



    I think you're being a little unfair- T-Mo isn't the new kid on the
    block anymore- they've matured and have built out an excellent network in
    a number of cities. Like Sprint, they've focused on covering population
    rather than geography, and have used roaming agreements to fill in the
    gaps.

    Here in southwest Denver, T-Mo (and Sprint) hit places Cingular (and
    sometimes Verizon) don't.

    T-Mo's been around for a good number of years now and have invested a lot
    in their network. It's a little disingenuous to say that their rating
    was based on discouraging customers that have no coverage at home or work!





    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com




  11. #11
    Robert Coe
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 01:31:30 GMT, John Navas <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    : The big, really big, question is whether or not Sprint can pull all this
    : off. The technical, financial, and business risks are truly huge. Thus
    : far this is mostly vaporware, with Sprint mostly selling the Same Old
    : Stuff (including iDEN). Only time will tell. But I wouldn't want to be
    : a shareholder.
    :
    : On 5 Dec 2006 17:23:27 -0800, "[email protected]"
    : <[email protected]> wrote in
    : <[email protected]>:
    :
    : >Sprint dedicated $7 billion to network enhancements in 2006.
    : >Sprint is investing more than $2 billion into the Nextel National
    : >Network and adding more than 1,600 new cell sites to expand
    : >coverage and increase capacity across the country.
    : >Sprint leads the industry in mobile broadband coverage and
    : >rollout of EVDO and EVDO Rev A. By the fourth quarter of 2007,
    : >Sprints entire mobile broadband network will be upgraded to
    : >EV-DO Revision A. Once the network is upgraded, Sprint will
    : >also expect to begin offering in early 2008 high performance
    : >walkie-talkie services over the EV-DO Revision A network.
    : >Don't forget 4G, Sprint's planned buildout of the 4G WiMAX
    : >network will be the standard for future mobility products and services.
    : >
    : >The hallmark of Sprint Nextel is innovation.
    : >Sprint's ranked #1 in the telecommunications industry in the
    : >area of innovation in the FORTUNEs 2006 Most Admired Companies list.
    : >Sprint Nextels impressive portfolio of assets includes a
    : >high-speed data network, Sprint Power Vision, which empowers
    : >customers to do what they want, when they want it, where
    : >they want it. Sprint was the first carrier to offer live TV and
    : >today we offer more than more than 50 video channels that
    : >feature live and on-demand programming.
    : >
    : >Popular price plans are available to Sprint customers to help
    : >prevent them from paying high overage charges
    : >and paying for minutes they do not use. Nights start at 7 p.m., This
    : >gives customers two more hours of free calling. Sprint also offers
    : >plans with Free Incoming Calls - in which calls from any of the
    : >networks are free. Another item other co's don't offer.
    : >We Have Saved The Best for Last = Upgrade Fees Eliminated:
    : >Sprint recently eliminated device upgrade fees for existing customers
    : >when they purchase a new device either through telesales or
    : >online at www.sprint.com
    : >
    : >---All Fact!!!




  12. #12
    Robert Coe
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 01:04:31 -0700, Todd Allcock
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    : At 05 Dec 2006 17:00:50 -0800 SMS wrote:
    :
    : > While it's not surprising that Verizon ranked first in 14 out of 20
    : > areas, and second in the rest, I'm surprised that T-Mobile beat them in
    : > three cities. No doubt T-Mobile's policy of discouraging new sign-ups
    : > for people with no coverage at their home and work locations plays a
    : > part in their good ratings.
    :
    :
    : I think you're being a little unfair- T-Mo isn't the new kid on the
    : block anymore- they've matured and have built out an excellent network in
    : a number of cities. Like Sprint, they've focused on covering population
    : rather than geography, and have used roaming agreements to fill in the
    : gaps.
    :
    : Here in southwest Denver, T-Mo (and Sprint) hit places Cingular (and
    : sometimes Verizon) don't.
    :
    : T-Mo's been around for a good number of years now and have invested a lot
    : in their network. It's a little disingenuous to say that their rating
    : was based on discouraging customers that have no coverage at home or work!

    I guess I read SMS's comments a little differently. I thought he was pointing
    out that T-Mobile was being honest about their coverage areas and trying to
    avoid selling their service to customers who were sure to be dissatisfied and
    drag down their ratings. To me that's a sound business practice that all
    carriers should emulate.

    Bob



  13. #13
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    Robert Coe wrote:

    > I guess I read SMS's comments a little differently. I thought he was pointing
    > out that T-Mobile was being honest about their coverage areas and trying to
    > avoid selling their service to customers who were sure to be dissatisfied and
    > drag down their ratings. To me that's a sound business practice that all
    > carriers should emulate.


    Yes, that's what I intended. However I should also point out that out in
    the western region, T-Mobile is different than the old Voicestream that
    people back east are used to. Originally, T-Mobile did a swap with
    Cingular, where Cingular let T-Mobile use their 1900 MHz western
    network, and T-Mobile let Cingular use their 1900 MHz NY network. The
    1900 MHz GSM network out west was particularly bad (I had it for a
    year), and it still isn't the greatest. When Cingular took over AT&T
    Wireless, T-Mobile got the Cingular 1900 MHz network. Because Cingular,
    formerly Pacific Bell Wireless was so late to the party, they had too
    problems, first they couldn't put towers in all the prime locations that
    AT&T and Verizon had towers, and second they were stuck at the less
    desirable 1900 MHz, which is big disadvantage in terms of coverage.
    Voicestream had a much longer history, and had good coverage in much of
    the country.

    I think that one reason why T-Mobile did so well in the CR survey, at
    least in many regions, is that unlike Sprint and Cingular, who will sell
    service to anyone with a pulse, T-Mobile actually checks to see if the
    potential subscriber will have coverage, and if they don't, then they
    discourage the potential subscriber from signing up. This policy results
    in a lot fewer unhappy customers. With roaming on Cingular, in
    non-T-Mobile areas, T-Mobile has pretty good nationwide coverage.

    It's rather surprising how poorly Cingular fared, considering that their
    network is much larger than T-Mobile's. I'm most familiar with the San
    Francisco Bay Area, where Cingular has a lot less coverage than Verizon,
    especially in non-urban areas, but T-Mobile also has a lot less coverage
    than Verizon in the Bay Area, and was actually ranked the same as
    Cingular, and far below Verizon.



  14. #14
    Double Tap
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service


    "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Robert Coe wrote:
    >
    >> I guess I read SMS's comments a little differently. I thought he was
    >> pointing
    >> out that T-Mobile was being honest about their coverage areas and trying
    >> to
    >> avoid selling their service to customers who were sure to be dissatisfied
    >> and
    >> drag down their ratings. To me that's a sound business practice that all
    >> carriers should emulate.

    >
    > Yes, that's what I intended. However I should also point out that out in
    > the western region, T-Mobile is different than the old Voicestream that
    > people back east are used to. Originally, T-Mobile did a swap with
    > Cingular, where Cingular let T-Mobile use their 1900 MHz western network,
    > and T-Mobile let Cingular use their 1900 MHz NY network. The 1900 MHz GSM
    > network out west was particularly bad (I had it for a year), and it still
    > isn't the greatest. When Cingular took over AT&T Wireless, T-Mobile got
    > the Cingular 1900 MHz network. Because Cingular, formerly Pacific Bell
    > Wireless was so late to the party, they had too problems, first they
    > couldn't put towers in all the prime locations that AT&T and Verizon had
    > towers, and second they were stuck at the less desirable 1900 MHz, which
    > is big disadvantage in terms of coverage. Voicestream had a much longer
    > history, and had good coverage in much of the country.
    >
    > I think that one reason why T-Mobile did so well in the CR survey, at
    > least in many regions, is that unlike Sprint and Cingular, who will sell
    > service to anyone with a pulse, T-Mobile actually checks to see if the
    > potential subscriber will have coverage, and if they don't, then they
    > discourage the potential subscriber from signing up. This policy results
    > in a lot fewer unhappy customers. With roaming on Cingular, in
    > non-T-Mobile areas, T-Mobile has pretty good nationwide coverage.
    >
    > It's rather surprising how poorly Cingular fared, considering that their
    > network is much larger than T-Mobile's. I'm most familiar with the San
    > Francisco Bay Area, where Cingular has a lot less coverage than Verizon,
    > especially in non-urban areas, but T-Mobile also has a lot less coverage
    > than Verizon in the Bay Area, and was actually ranked the same as
    > Cingular, and far below Verizon.


    I live in NYC and was with T-Mobile since the days it was Omni Point and was
    relatively happy with my service.
    Granted the old Verizon service that my wife had at that time was better in
    many respects than O-P/VoiceStream.
    However for the past 2-3 years my T-Mobile service was in my opinion
    excellent.

    I just switched to Cingular 2 months ago and I am very happy with the
    service. I have not had any dropped calls and only 2 calls going into voice
    mail after one or two rings. I find the customer service just as good as
    T-Mobile which I consider to be excellent.

    The only reason I switched to Cingular was because I was very frustrated by
    a lack of coverage in Virginia when I go to visit relatives that live there.
    I loved the fact the T-Mobile always gave me the unlock code for any phone
    that I owned so I could use local SIM cards when I traveled overseas which
    was quite often.

    So far after only 2 months I would rate Cingular a the equal to T-Mobile

    Double Tap





  15. #15
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: Consumer Reports survey on Customer Service

    Double Tap wrote:

    > The only reason I switched to Cingular was because I was very frustrated by
    > a lack of coverage in Virginia when I go to visit relatives that live there.
    > I loved the fact the T-Mobile always gave me the unlock code for any phone
    > that I owned so I could use local SIM cards when I traveled overseas which
    > was quite often.
    >
    > So far after only 2 months I would rate Cingular a the equal to T-Mobile


    AT&T Wireless had big capacity problems in NYC, which Cingular inherited
    when they acquired them. Fortunately these problems seem to have been
    solved. I was in NYC earlier this year, in Cingular was fine. I was also
    in Washington DC where Verizon is still much, much better than Cingular,
    with one of the major advantages being coverage in the metro.



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