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  1. #1
    SMS
    Guest
    "http://www.techweb.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196601406"

    "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
    and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
    non-U.S. countries, CR observed."

    That's great news, as there are certainly a lot of non-U.S. countries.

    Actually, you can use CDMA phones in a lot of non-U.S. countries as
    well, just not as many as with GSM phones. And there are several
    countries where CDMA works but GSM doesn't, including Japan and Korea.
    CDMA is growing by leaps and bounds, with a lot of new deployments in
    4Q2006, and more coming next year, especially at 450MHz.



    See More: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."




  2. #2
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 15:43:29 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
    wrote in <[email protected]>:

    >"http://www.techweb.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196601406"
    >
    >"Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
    >and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
    >non-U.S. countries, CR observed."
    >
    >That's great news, as there are certainly a lot of non-U.S. countries.
    >
    >Actually, you can use CDMA phones in a lot of non-U.S. countries as
    >well, just not as many as with GSM phones.


    Actually not very many, and more importantly not with local pre-paid
    SIMs, a huge advantage of GSM over CDMA2000.

    >And there are several
    >countries where CDMA works but GSM doesn't, including Japan and Korea.


    That's 2, not "several". GSM works in vastly more places than CDMA2000.
    See GSMWorld.com

    >CDMA is growing by leaps and bounds, with a lot of new deployments in
    >4Q2006, and more coming next year, especially at 450MHz.


    CDMA2000 is actually on the decline, with Nokia having abandoned it,
    Sprint migrating to WiMAX, other countries thinking of dumping it (e.g.,
    India), and even Qualcomm is hedging its bets.

    Kindly take your CDMA2000 trolling someplace else.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  3. #3
    Dennis Ferguson
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    On 2006-12-07, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "http://www.techweb.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196601406"
    >
    > "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
    > and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
    > non-U.S. countries, CR observed."
    >
    > That's great news, as there are certainly a lot of non-U.S. countries.
    >
    > Actually, you can use CDMA phones in a lot of non-U.S. countries as
    > well, just not as many as with GSM phones. And there are several
    > countries where CDMA works but GSM doesn't, including Japan and Korea.
    > CDMA is growing by leaps and bounds, with a lot of new deployments in
    > 4Q2006, and more coming next year, especially at 450MHz.


    That's a little bogus. I'm not positive but I don't think any Verizon or
    Sprint phone will roam in Japan, I think the CDMA frequency assignments in
    Japan are different. You can, however, roam in both Japan and Korea
    with a GSM SIM if you buy a WCDMA phone to put it in (and if you stick to
    the cities). I also doubt whether Verizon or Sprint will be offering
    phones supporting 450 MHz, that is in the middle of an amateur
    band in the US and is hence unavailable for use in their service area.

    There used to be, however, a saving grace to CDMA roaming with a Verizon
    phone, that being that if the phone worked in the country you were in the
    charges (for local and incoming calls at least) were a reasonably modest
    (for international roaming) $0.69 per minute. Unfortunately, since Verizon
    has almost doubled its prices for most countries (Sprint's prices were
    always outrageous), even that advantage has mostly gone and there remains no
    reason to carry a US CDMA phone outside the country.

    Or almost no reason. I still think Verizon's North America's Choice
    plans are a fantastic deal if you travel frequently to Canada or
    (particularly) Mexico. This is one of the two reasons I have a Verizon
    phone, the other being SF bay area mountain coverage.

    Dennis Ferguson



  4. #4
    carcarx
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."



    On Dec 7, 5:54 pm, John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sprint migrating to WiMAX,


    How in the world did you come to that conclusion???

    They're not migrating to, they're adding WiMax. It's part of their deal
    with the FCC to justify
    being able to keep their 2.5 GHz spectrum when merging with Nextel.




  5. #5
    Joel Kolstad
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon and
    > Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.
    > countries, CR observed."


    "Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically purchased
    an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the odds of the
    average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?

    Granted, trying to use a CDMA phone outside the U.S. is probably a 1 in 1000
    shot; I'd be surprised if we could find anyone who has successfully taken,
    e.g., a Sprint phone and gotten it to work in, say, Japan. But perhaps I'm
    horribly mistaken...







  6. #6
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

    Joel Kolstad wrote:
    > "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon and
    >> Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.
    >> countries, CR observed."

    >
    > "Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically purchased
    > an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the odds of the
    > average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?


    True, but the frequent European or Asian traveler has probably figured
    it out.

    > Granted, trying to use a CDMA phone outside the U.S. is probably a 1 in 1000
    > shot; I'd be surprised if we could find anyone who has successfully taken,
    > e.g., a Sprint phone and gotten it to work in, say, Japan. But perhaps I'm
    > horribly mistaken...


    No, you're not mistaken. However the story is different in Korea, where
    it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
    etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
    coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
    countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
    populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.



  7. #7
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

    SMS wrote:

    > No, you're not mistaken. However the story is different in Korea, where
    > it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
    > etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
    > coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
    > countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
    > populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.


    Also note that you can get a combo CDMA 800/1900 & GSM 900/1800 handset
    from Verizon. This gives you the best of both worlds. You get Verizon's
    superior U.S. network, and you can roam on CDMA and GSM in other countries.

    Personally, I prefer buying a prepaid GSM SIM card when traveling, as
    it's much more cost efficient. Even when I can claim the cost on an
    expense report, it just galls me to pay the international roaming charges.



  8. #8
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    On Fri, 8 Dec 2006 10:55:44 -0800, "Joel Kolstad"
    <[email protected]> wrote in
    <[email protected]>:

    >"SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon and
    >> Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.
    >> countries, CR observed."

    >
    >"Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically purchased
    >an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the odds of the
    >average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?


    Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers in
    good standing.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  9. #9
    John Navas
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
    wrote in <[email protected]>:

    >... However the story is different in Korea, where
    >it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
    >etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
    >coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
    >countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
    >populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.


    In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
    signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.

    --
    Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
    John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>



  10. #10
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

    Dennis Ferguson wrote:

    > That's a little bogus. I'm not positive but I don't think any Verizon or
    > Sprint phone will roam in Japan, I think the CDMA frequency assignments in
    > Japan are different.


    Soon. Samsung has a phone that works, and there is already CDMA roaming
    for Korean users in Japan.



  11. #11
    Double Tap
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."


    "Joel Kolstad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
    >> and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
    >> non-U.S. countries, CR observed."

    >
    > "Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically
    > purchased an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the
    > odds of the average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?


    Absolutely incorrect. You do not need an unlocked phone to have service.
    If your phone functions on the 900/1800/1900 GSM frequency bands and your
    local service provider has a roaming agreement with the overseas provider
    your phone will work. However you per minute cost might be through the roof,
    so by having an unlocked phone you can purchase a local SIM card and get
    much better rates.
    >
    > Granted, trying to use a CDMA phone outside the U.S. is probably a 1 in
    > 1000 shot; I'd be surprised if we could find anyone who has successfully
    > taken, e.g., a Sprint phone and gotten it to work in, say, Japan. But
    > perhaps I'm horribly mistaken...
    >
    >
    >
    >






  12. #12
    james g. keegan jr.
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    In article <[email protected]>,
    John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
    > wrote in <[email protected]>:
    >
    > >... However the story is different in Korea, where
    > >it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
    > >etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
    > >coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
    > >countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
    > >populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.

    >
    > In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
    > signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.


    in fact, cdma is the fastest growing technology in china. you need to
    stop talking about things you are ignorant of, john. doing so, as you
    do often lately, makes you look silly and lessens your credibility to
    speak to any subject you might know something about.



  13. #13
    sw
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "james g. keegan jr." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > John Navas <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
    > > wrote in <[email protected]>:
    > >
    > > >... However the story is different in Korea, where
    > > >it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
    > > >etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
    > > >coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
    > > >countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
    > > >populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.

    > >
    > > In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
    > > signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.

    >
    > in fact, cdma is the fastest growing technology in china. you need to
    > stop talking about things you are ignorant of, john. doing so, as you
    > do often lately, makes you look silly and lessens your credibility to
    > speak to any subject you might know something about.


    Anus navas worships Nokia. Whatever Nokia claims or says must be right.
    Actually, this is another case of navas cut and paste.



  14. #14
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    At 08 Dec 2006 10:55:44 -0800 Joel Kolstad wrote:

    > > "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for
    > > Verizon and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be
    > > used in many non-U.S. countries, CR observed."

    >
    > "Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically
    > purchased an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd
    > say the odds of the average person having such a phone is perhaps...
    > 1 in 10?



    Others have pointed out it's pretty easy to get a phone unlocked by
    Cingular or T-Mo, but forgetting that, an unlocked phone is NOT required
    for international roaming- both Cingular and T-Mobile have roaming
    agreements with other GSM carriers worldwide. The rates are certainly
    high vs. using prepaid SIMs abroad, but they require no hassles on the
    users part- dial the customer's US cellular number and it rings wherever
    (albeit for $1-5/minute depending on location!)




    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com




  15. #15
    carcarx
    Guest

    Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

    John Navas wrote:
    > On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
    > wrote in <[email protected]>:


    > In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
    > signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.


    And then, again, they may not. (The roaming revenue from the overseas
    GSM users is hard not to go after, so lets get enough of a network
    going
    so we can rake in the roaming revenue! Aren't free markets great?)




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