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  1. #1
    Various websites show that CMA141A analog roaming on SID 0333 was
    removed between PRL 10031 and 10032.

    Does this mean that analog roaming on this carrier is no longer
    possible? Assume that this is the only signal.




    See More: Analog Roaming Question




  2. #2

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    Analog Roaming would be available where no sprint service or
    Digital roaming signal would be in place at due to cost with
    partnerships and such this will change from time to time.
    The newest PRL is 10036 now.


    [email protected] wrote:
    > Various websites show that CMA141A analog roaming on SID 0333 was
    > removed between PRL 10031 and 10032.
    >
    > Does this mean that analog roaming on this carrier is no longer
    > possible? Assume that this is the only signal.





  3. #3
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    All Sprint roaming has to be digital provided that there is a CDMA provider
    in that area because most of the Sprint phones do not have analog
    capability. Sprint is phasing out analog phones.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Analog Roaming would be available where no sprint service or
    > Digital roaming signal would be in place at due to cost with
    > partnerships and such this will change from time to time.
    > The newest PRL is 10036 now.
    >
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> Various websites show that CMA141A analog roaming on SID 0333 was
    >> removed between PRL 10031 and 10032.
    >>
    >> Does this mean that analog roaming on this carrier is no longer
    >> possible? Assume that this is the only signal.

    >






  4. #4

    Re: Analog Roaming Question


    [email protected] wrote:
    > Analog Roaming would be available where no sprint service or
    > Digital roaming signal would be in place at due to cost with
    > partnerships and such this will change from time to time.
    > The newest PRL is 10036 now.

    So my question remains. If an analog carrier is not in the PRL, is it
    unavailable to roam at cost?




  5. #5

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    PRL or prefered roaming list, is basically, just a list of towers that
    are the least expensive for sprint to use based upon whatever contracts
    Sprint has with the tower owner/service provider. If the service
    provider is still there, and the tower has not been removed, then you
    still should be able to use the analog signal as long as you have at
    least a dual band phone. However, if there are any other signals in
    the area at all that are on the PRL, the phone is going to seek them
    out 1st. most phones have a way to change the settings, to where they
    will do one of the following things. a. seek out only sprint service.
    b. seek out only roaming service. or c. whatever is availabe
    [automatic]. Theoretically, the analog provider should still be
    available to use even if it is not in the PRL as long as they are still
    doing business in that area. There are some places, and some providers
    that if you picked up their signal, you would be required to give them
    a credit card number to charge your calls to. this is called manual
    roaming. I hope this clears up the issue a little bit



    [email protected] wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > Analog Roaming would be available where no sprint service or
    > > Digital roaming signal would be in place at due to cost with
    > > partnerships and such this will change from time to time.
    > > The newest PRL is 10036 now.

    > So my question remains. If an analog carrier is not in the PRL, is it
    > unavailable to roam at cost?





  6. #6
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    [email protected] wrote:

    > So my question remains. If an analog carrier is not in the PRL, is it
    > unavailable to roam at cost?



    It depends on the PRL entry.

    If the aalog carrier was simply removed from the list, then it's
    possible IF there's no other signal available.

    If there is a NEG entry for that SID in the PRL, then the phone is
    instructed NOT to roam on that carrier under any circumstances except
    for 911 use. In this instance, the phone will not lock on to that
    signal, even if there is nothing else.

    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.



  7. #7
    Frank Harris
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    I think that if this is the only signal available, and it is not marked
    as "Neg" or negative in the PRL (which it wouldn't be if it isn't in the
    PRL at all), and if Sprint still has an arrangement with that carrier,
    then your phone will be able to use it.

    I think that Sprint maintains some agreements for some time after the
    carrier is removed from the latest PRL, to accommodate phones in the
    field that still have older PRL's.

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Various websites show that CMA141A analog roaming on SID 0333 was
    > removed between PRL 10031 and 10032.
    >
    > Does this mean that analog roaming on this carrier is no longer
    > possible? Assume that this is the only signal.
    >


    --

    Frank Harris in San Francisco with a A920



  8. #8
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    I would only want to roam on analog if there was no other option and I had
    to make an emergency phone call. It is important the understand that if you
    are using an analog phone, any geek-boy with a police scanner can listen-in
    on your phone call. Analog is on its last breath and it is time that we all
    moved on to digital phones.





  9. #9
    Joe Gill
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question


    "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I would only want to roam on analog if there was no other option and I had
    >to make an emergency phone call. It is important the understand that if you
    >are using an analog phone, any geek-boy with a police scanner can listen-in
    >on your phone call. Analog is on its last breath and it is time that we all
    >moved on to digital phones.
    >


    Agreed....
    But I have found places that the ONLY place I can roam on is Analog.
    It appears there are some very very rural places, that all you get it Analog
    for roaming....
    That is why I still stick with the multi-band/Analog phone...





  10. #10
    Mij Adyaw
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    I wonder what will happen with OnStar subscribers when the analog system is
    deleted. I believe that they use analog phones.

    "Joe Gill" <[email protected]@prodigy.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Mij Adyaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>I would only want to roam on analog if there was no other option and I had
    >>to make an emergency phone call. It is important the understand that if
    >>you are using an analog phone, any geek-boy with a police scanner can
    >>listen-in on your phone call. Analog is on its last breath and it is time
    >>that we all moved on to digital phones.
    >>

    >
    > Agreed....
    > But I have found places that the ONLY place I can roam on is Analog.
    > It appears there are some very very rural places, that all you get it
    > Analog for roaming....
    > That is why I still stick with the multi-band/Analog phone...
    >






  11. #11
    Isaiah Beard
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > I wonder what will happen with OnStar subscribers when the analog system is
    > deleted. I believe that they use analog phones.



    All OnStar equipped cars prior to 2002 are analog only, and cannot be
    upgraded; their service will be discontinued in 2008. SOME 2002-2004
    models are upgradeable. 2005 and beyond I believe are fully CDMA.

    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.



  12. #12

    Re: Analog Roaming Question


    > Agreed....
    > But I have found places that the ONLY place I can roam on is Analog.
    > It appears there are some very very rural places, that all you get it Analog
    > for roaming....
    > That is why I still stick with the multi-band/Analog phone...

    Which bring up which phone. I have a very particular place in mind,
    which with my Cingular TDMA phone (Nokia 6360) requires an external
    antenna or the signal is unusable. Since nobody seems to list which
    phones have antenna ports, I looked at internet stores that sell
    antenna adapters.

    The most recent phone I found was the LG MM 535. This phone
    unfortunately does not have Bluetooth.

    Does a Sprint CDMA/Amps phone with external antenna port and bluetooth
    exist? Or should I just be happy that I can get analog service at all.




  13. #13
    TL Mitchell
    Guest

    Re: Analog Roaming Question

    <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Does a Sprint CDMA/Amps phone with external antenna port and bluetooth
    > exist? Or should I just be happy that I can get analog service at all.


    PhoneScoop lists 4 Sprint phones as CDMA/AMPS with bluetooth:

    LG LX-150

    Nokia 6165i

    Samsung SPH-A640

    Sanyo Katana / SCP-6600

    No listings in the features for external antenna port. Prolly have to delve
    into the User Manuals to sniff that out.

    TL






  14. #14

    Re: Analog Roaming Question


    > PhoneScoop lists 4 Sprint phones as CDMA/AMPS with bluetooth:
    >
    > LG LX-150
    >
    > Nokia 6165i
    >
    > Samsung SPH-A640
    >
    > Sanyo Katana / SCP-6600
    >

    I went to Wilson Electronics web site, and went through the phone
    antenna adapters. I found an LG LX 350.

    Bluetooth, CDMA AMPS listed on phonescoop, only offered by Sprint.




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