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  1. #1
    notaguru
    Guest
    My five accounts have been paid automatically for the last ten
    years, so we're viewed as good customers. My own line is long
    out of contract.

    Sprint is sending me a new Palm-OS 755P, and giving me two years
    of Internet access at no charge. Here's my question. When the
    CSR said "no charge", did that mean unlimited access?

    Or... what?



    See More: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???




  2. #2
    notaguru
    Guest

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    JD in TX wrote:
    > notaguru <[email protected]> wrote in news:f78tq4$aat$1
    > @registered.motzarella.org:
    >
    >> Here's my question. When the
    >> CSR said "no charge", did that mean unlimited access?

    >
    > No, they meant no charge when they stick it up your rear. Whatever they
    > promise you means nothing unless you get it in writing.



    That's not helpful. We have a lot of lines and pay our bills.
    Even with a new contract on this phone, I have no problem
    reducing it to minimum use and switching every other line to
    another provider. They surely know that and seek my satisfaction.

    My question: what does "no charge" mean?




  3. #3

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    notaguru wrote:
    > JD in TX wrote:
    >> notaguru <[email protected]> wrote in news:f78tq4$aat$1
    >> @registered.motzarella.org:
    >>
    >>> Here's my question. When the CSR said "no charge", did that mean
    >>> unlimited access?

    >>
    >> No, they meant no charge when they stick it up your rear. Whatever
    >> they promise you means nothing unless you get it in writing.

    >
    >
    > That's not helpful. We have a lot of lines and pay our bills. Even with
    > a new contract on this phone, I have no problem reducing it to minimum
    > use and switching every other line to another provider. They surely know
    > that and seek my satisfaction.
    >
    > My question: what does "no charge" mean?


    It's probably "Power Vision", and it probably really does mean "no
    charge", all you can eat.

    The SERO deal includes Power Vision at no additional charge. I pay
    $30/month for 500 anytime minutes and Power Vision. That's the
    equivalent of the SERO deal, which I negotiated when my contract was up
    (along with a free swap of my Treo 600 for a refurb -- or new, I can't
    tell -- 650).



  4. #4
    notaguru
    Guest

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    Thanks for the input.

    I just talked with Sprint (second call in a year!) and learned
    that my line now has "Power Vision" as suggested by a poster,
    which apparently is unlimited online access. No charge for the
    minutes used.

    Seems quite good. I plan to use the phone as a modem for my
    laptop, which has Bluetooth in it. That may permit terminating
    my home internet account... No?



  5. #5
    DTC
    Guest

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    notaguru wrote:
    > Seems quite good. I plan to use the phone as a modem for my laptop,
    > which has Bluetooth in it. That may permit terminating my home internet
    > account... No?


    Yes you could terminated your home internet connection. But keep in mind,
    if you ever want to do something like, live home security camera monitoring
    - you can't do it with a Sprint connection.



  6. #6
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    At 14 Jul 2007 11:30:44 -0700 notaguru wrote:

    > I just talked with Sprint (second call in a year!) and learned that
    > my line now has "Power Vision" as suggested by a poster, which
    > apparently is unlimited online access. No charge for the minutes used.
    >
    > Seems quite good. I plan to use the phone as a modem for my laptop,
    > which has Bluetooth in it. That may permit terminating my home
    > internet account... No?


    Probably no. IIRC, Powervision does NOT allow tethering unless you add a
    "PAM" (Phone As Modem) option for an additional monthly fee.

    Sprint reserves the right to shut off your PowerVision if they catch you
    tethering. From what I understand they use usage patterns to deduce
    whether or not you tether- i.e. someone with a low-end phone is unlikely
    to download 10GB of data in a month, etc.

    IIRC, adding PAM is a fairly reasonably pried option.


    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com




  7. #7
    DerMerovingian
    Guest

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    Geez, why not call them and find out!!!

    On 2007-07-13 20:25:17 -0400, notaguru <[email protected]> said:

    > JD in TX wrote:
    >> notaguru <[email protected]> wrote in news:f78tq4$aat$1
    >> @registered.motzarella.org:
    >>
    >>> Here's my question. When the CSR said "no charge", did that mean
    >>> unlimited access?

    >>
    >> No, they meant no charge when they stick it up your rear. Whatever they
    >> promise you means nothing unless you get it in writing.

    >
    >
    > That's not helpful. We have a lot of lines and pay our bills. Even with
    > a new contract on this phone, I have no problem reducing it to minimum
    > use and switching every other line to another provider. They surely
    > know that and seek my satisfaction.
    >
    > My question: what does "no charge" mean?






  8. #8
    notaguru
    Guest

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    DerMerovingian wrote:
    > Geez, why not call them and find out!!!


    I didn't want to go through that hassle, but when the freebie
    didn't appear on my website account I did call. It is "Power
    Vision", which seems like a great deal if I can use it to go online.



  9. #9

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???

    notaguru wrote:
    > DerMerovingian wrote:
    >> Geez, why not call them and find out!!!

    >
    > I didn't want to go through that hassle, but when the freebie didn't
    > appear on my website account I did call. It is "Power Vision", which
    > seems like a great deal if I can use it to go online.


    No, sorry, you can't -- at least, not for long. You can use it for
    Internet access ON YOUR PHONE. As someone else indicated, if you try
    "tethering", i.e., hooking up a PC *through* your phone, they will
    probably eventually detect it and shut you down -- and possibly charge
    you and exorbitant rate.

    If you want to tether, you'll need a PAM (phone-as-modem) feature added
    to your account. And your data rates will probably not be as good as
    landline broadband.



  10. #10
    J. Michael Milner
    Guest

    Re: "Internet access at no charge" -- means ???


    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > notaguru wrote:
    > > DerMerovingian wrote:
    > >> Geez, why not call them and find out!!!

    > >
    > > I didn't want to go through that hassle, but when the freebie didn't
    > > appear on my website account I did call. It is "Power Vision", which
    > > seems like a great deal if I can use it to go online.

    >
    > No, sorry, you can't -- at least, not for long. You can use it for
    > Internet access ON YOUR PHONE. As someone else indicated, if you try
    > "tethering", i.e., hooking up a PC *through* your phone, they will
    > probably eventually detect it and shut you down -- and possibly charge
    > you and exorbitant rate.
    >
    > If you want to tether, you'll need a PAM (phone-as-modem) feature added
    > to your account. And your data rates will probably not be as good as
    > landline broadband.


    I've spent 6 hours on the phone with Sprint over the past 2 days trying
    to determine where Power Vision (or whatever marketing is calling it today)
    ends and Phone as Modem starts. While all but 30 minutes of those hours
    involved waiting on hold after being bounced from department to department,
    the answer still isn't clear. I came away with the impression that most of
    the CSRs don't really understand anything about the data services. Since
    it appears that PAM using the same packet transport mechanism as the
    phone's web browser, the "usage determines class of service (PV or PAM)"
    sounds likely.

    If you really want to laugh, talk to the Nextel side about data.