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  1. #1
    SMS
    Guest
    Another MVNO bit the dust as Disney Mobile, an MVNO on Sprint's network,
    called it quits today.

    "http://www.thestreet.com/s/signal-fades-for-disney-mobile/newsanalysis/techtelecom/10381822.html?puc=googlefi"

    It was never a very good deal, but it did have that tracking feature
    built in.

    Let's see:

    AMP'd
    ESPN
    Disney

    Helio and Boost appears to be in line to be the next victims in the
    shakeout.

    It's interesting that the low-budget MVNO's seem to be able to keep
    chugging along by keeping administrative, marketing, and sales cost to a
    minimum, while it's not possible for high-profile challengers to Virgin
    and TracFone to make a go of it.




    See More: Disney Mobile calls it Quits




  2. #2
    zeez
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    On Sep 27, 8:23 pm, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Another MVNO bit the dust as Disney Mobile, an MVNO on Sprint's network,
    > called it quits today.
    >
    > "http://www.thestreet.com/s/signal-fades-for-disney-mobile/newsanalysi..."
    >
    > It was never a very good deal, but it did have that tracking feature
    > built in.
    >
    > Let's see:
    >
    > AMP'd
    > ESPN
    > Disney
    >
    > Helio and Boost appears to be in line to be the next victims in the
    > shakeout.
    >
    > It's interesting that the low-budget MVNO's seem to be able to keep
    > chugging along by keeping administrative, marketing, and sales cost to a
    > minimum, while it's not possible for high-profile challengers to Virgin
    > and TracFone to make a go of it.


    I wonder what happens to the phones that are tied in/locked to the
    service? Do they get moved over to a regular Sprint account?




  3. #3
    News
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits



    SMS wrote:

    > Another MVNO bit the dust as Disney Mobile, an MVNO on Sprint's network,
    > called it quits today.
    >



    No surprise. It was a Mickey Mouse deal...



  4. #4
    zeez
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    On Sep 28, 4:18 am, zeez <Ulti[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Sep 27, 8:23 pm, SMS <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Another MVNO bit the dust as Disney Mobile, an MVNO on Sprint's network,
    > > called it quits today.

    >
    > > "http://www.thestreet.com/s/signal-fades-for-disney-mobile/newsanalysi..."

    >
    > > It was never a very good deal, but it did have that tracking feature
    > > built in.

    >
    > > Let's see:

    >
    > > AMP'd
    > > ESPN
    > > Disney

    >
    > > Helio and Boost appears to be in line to be the next victims in the
    > > shakeout.

    >
    > > It's interesting that the low-budget MVNO's seem to be able to keep
    > > chugging along by keeping administrative, marketing, and sales cost to a
    > > minimum, while it's not possible for high-profile challengers to Virgin
    > > and TracFone to make a go of it.

    >
    > I wonder what happens to the phones that are tied in/locked to the
    > service? Do they get moved over to a regular Sprint account?



    oops, I guess not:

    >From http://disneymobile.go.com/home/homepage.html


    IMPORTANT CUSTOMER ANNOUNCEMENT

    Disney Mobile has announced that it will cease its wireless operations
    as of December 31, 2007. It has been our privilege to serve as your
    wireless service provider and we want to thank you for your support of
    Disney Mobile.

    We will continue to provide voice, messaging and the Family Center
    services through December 31, 2007. In addition, billing and care
    support will be available during that time. As of September 27, 2007,
    content and applications will no longer be available for purchase.

    The Disney Mobile web site will remain in operation to service our
    existing customers through December 31, 2007.

    In recognition of any inconvenience this may cause you, Disney Mobile
    will be providing a reimbursement program covering handsets as well as
    accessories and content purchased directly through Disney Mobile
    (please note: reimbursements will be processed upon final receipt of
    full payment and termination of your account). Complete details
    surrounding this reimbursement program will be communicated via this
    web site by October 8, 2007.

    You will continue to be billed for service through December 31, 2007,
    unless you call Guest Services to terminate prior to that date. Disney
    Mobile will waive early termination fees provided your account is paid
    in full.

    If you want to retain your wireless phone number and transfer it to
    another wireless carrier, we encourage you to sign up for service with
    the other carrier before November 30, 2007. This will ensure there is
    adequate time to transfer your phone number. You should not terminate
    your Disney Mobile account until your new carrier successfully
    transfers your wireless phone number (See http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/NumberPortability/
    to learn more about porting your number to a new carrier).

    We at Disney Mobile have truly valued your business and apologize for
    any inconvenience this change may cause.

    Further information is provided in the following page.




  5. #5

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    On Thu, 27 Sep 2007 20:23:19 -0700, SMS <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Another MVNO bit the dust as Disney Mobile, an MVNO on Sprint's network,
    >called it quits today.
    >
    >"http://www.thestreet.com/s/signal-fades-for-disney-mobile/newsanalysis/techtelecom/10381822.html?puc=googlefi"
    >
    >It was never a very good deal, but it did have that tracking feature
    >built in.
    >
    >Let's see:
    >
    >AMP'd
    >ESPN
    >Disney
    >
    >Helio and Boost appears to be in line to be the next victims in the
    >shakeout.
    >
    >It's interesting that the low-budget MVNO's seem to be able to keep
    >chugging along by keeping administrative, marketing, and sales cost to a
    >minimum, while it's not possible for high-profile challengers to Virgin
    >and TracFone to make a go of it.



    Maybe Disney's failure says more about the Sprint Network than it does
    about Disney's marketing efforts.




  6. #6
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Maybe Disney's failure says more about the Sprint Network than it does
    > about Disney's marketing efforts.
    >


    I doubt it. Virgin seems to be doing well despite being saddled with
    Sprint's network.



  7. #7
    Larry
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    SMS <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > http://www.thestreet.com/s/signal-fa.../newsanalysis/
    > techtelecom/10381822.html?puc=googlefi


    Of much greater interest from the webpage is the one on Vonage's demise:
    http://www.thestreet.com/s/vonages-vanishing-
    act/newsanalysis/techtelecom/10381531.html?

    They're TOAST! My condolences to Vonage users stuck with useless equipment
    once the company goes dark.


    Larry
    --
    Search youtube for "Depleted Uranium"
    The ultimate dirty bomb......



  8. #8

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 17:45:52 +0000, Larry <[email protected]> wrote:

    >SMS <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> http://www.thestreet.com/s/signal-fa.../newsanalysis/
    >> techtelecom/10381822.html?puc=googlefi

    >
    >Of much greater interest from the webpage is the one on Vonage's demise:
    >http://www.thestreet.com/s/vonages-vanishing-
    >act/newsanalysis/techtelecom/10381531.html?
    >
    >They're TOAST! My condolences to Vonage users stuck with useless equipment
    >once the company goes dark.
    >
    >
    >Larry



    Not quite what the story says:

    More accurately Vonage has lost patent suits to Verizon and now
    Sprint,
    which will hurt it for the short run.

    Interestingly, sn authoritative stoiry on the matter:

    http://www.marketwatch.com/news/stor...B1EFBD8AE6E%7D

    also says:

    Separately, Goldman Sachs cut its rating on Sprint to neutral from
    buy, saying that the company's turnaround plan is not working as
    quickly as hoped. Sprint shares fell ...






  9. #9
    Larry
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    [email protected] wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > More accurately Vonage has lost patent suits to Verizon and now
    > Sprint,
    > which will hurt it for the short run.
    >
    >


    I think you should rush out, NOW, while the price is under a dollar and
    buy a few hundred thousand shares! Get a second mortgage on your house!
    These guys are gonna make you RICH when Vonage shoots up, skyrockets,
    guns ablaze....

    Just look at that chart!
    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=VG&t=2y&l=on&z=m&q=l&c=
    You'd better hurry! It's shot up 4% JUST SINCE THE MARKET CLOSED TODAY!
    You can't get this kind of return from a bank! You had your chance at 97
    cents and BLEW IT!

    You can do what I did! I bought 180,000 shares of Worldcom at .06 near
    the dip in the crash, figuring, correctly, that the office furniture
    auction was going to bring in better than that. I had no trouble finding
    sellers...(c; I sold too soon at .19 because it went up to .22 before
    the final crash to zero....dammit.

    Pink Sheets can be lots of fun...(c;
    But, you gotta be QUICK!

    Larry
    --
    Er, ah, how many shares are you stuck with, anyways?.....??



  10. #10
    clifto
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    News wrote:
    > SMS wrote:
    >> Another MVNO bit the dust as Disney Mobile, an MVNO on Sprint's network,
    >> called it quits today.

    >
    > No surprise. It was a Mickey Mouse deal...


    Sounded goofy to me.

    --
    One phrase that explains 99% of all idiot driving:
    "You can't block traffic if you're not in the way."



  11. #11
    zeez
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    On Sep 28, 10:45 am, Larry <[email protected]> wrote:
    > SMS <[email protected]> wrote innews:[email protected]:
    >
    > >http://www.thestreet.com/s/signal-fa.../newsanalysis/
    > > techtelecom/10381822.html?puc=googlefi

    >
    > Of much greater interest from the webpage is the one on Vonage's demise:http://www.thestreet.com/s/vonages-vanishing-
    > act/newsanalysis/techtelecom/10381531.html?
    >
    > They're TOAST! My condolences to Vonage users stuck with useless equipment
    > once the company goes dark.
    >


    Which ultimately ends up in a land fill along with the toxic metals
    and materials it contains :\




  12. #12
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Larry <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Of much greater interest from the webpage is the one on Vonage's demise:
    >> http://www.thestreet.com/s/vonages-vanishing-
    >> act/newsanalysis/techtelecom/10381531.html?
    >>
    >> They're TOAST! My condolences to Vonage users stuck with useless equipment
    >> once the company goes dark.

    >
    > Bah. Us Sunrocket customers are old hat at that. It's yesterday's news.


    Vonage provided a valuable service with its saturation advertising. It
    made users aware of VOIP, and the ways it can be used. People that
    travel a lot like these services since they can use VOIP to have a
    "local" phone number when traveling, and use the hotel's free wireless
    for calls.

    However the problem was that a) Vonage was too expensive, and b) it had
    little appeal outside the market for people that used it as a traveling
    number type of service. Few people would ever spend anywhere close to
    $25/month on long distance. That's 1000 minutes on OneSuite, 1250
    minutes on TalkLoop. And of course most people have unlimited off-peak
    long distance on their cell phone plans.




  13. #13
    Todd Allcock
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    At 30 Sep 2007 09:10:25 -0700 SMS wrote:

    > Vonage provided a valuable service with its saturation advertising.
    > It made users aware of VOIP, and the ways it can be used.


    I agree with the first statement, but not the second. Vonage ads did
    put VoIP in the pblic eye, but they're relatively restrictive with
    use of the service that people DON'T get a feel for what they can do
    with VoIP- you had to pay extra for using softphones, couldn't
    register more than one ATA, etc. Compare that to more typical SIP
    provider that lets me use an ATA at home, while simultaneously using
    my PPC as a "cordless VoIP" phone and also having my laptop USB
    handset plugged in.

    > People that travel a lot like these services since they can use
    > VOIP to have a "local" phone number when traveling, and use the
    > hotel's free wireless for calls.



    But not (easily) with Vonage. The Vonage box has to plug into a
    physical router or DSL/cable modem (not WiFi) and AFAIK, the only
    softphone is a physical USB key registered to your service.

    > However the problem was that a) Vonage was too expensive


    Hardly- with taxes and fees, my local landline service is around
    $35/month- so even without the unlimited LD it's save me some money.

    > b) it had little appeal outside the market for people that used
    > it as a traveling number type of service.


    Again, I disagree- your cellphone easily provdes a "local number when
    travelig" and doesn't require lugging around VoIP ATAs or firing up a
    laptop.

    The attraction of VoIP is cheap landline replacement.

    > Few people would ever spend anywhere close to $25/month on long
    > distance.


    True, but that same $25 includes your local service as well. Again,
    using my example, I'd be nearly $10 ahead with Vonage forgetting LD
    (which I typically use my Cellphne for.)

    > That's 1000 minutes on OneSuite, 1250 minutes on TalkLoop. And
    > of course most people have unlimited off-peak long distance on
    > their cell phone plans.


    True.
    The "problem" with VoIP is that while it's cheaper than a landline,
    it's not as reliable, as high quality, or as easy to use. Most
    homeowners wouldn't know how to properly wire an ATA into their house
    wiring for seamless "plug a phone into any existing jack and get the
    VoIP line" service, many broadband connections occasionally need a
    modem or router reboot- it's all a little too "techie" compared to
    traditional POTS service. Plus, given the number of us using DSL,
    which generally "includes" a POTS line for only a few bucks more, any
    VIP savings are marginalized.

    Personally I find VoIP useful as a second line, or for international
    travel, but I dobn't consider myself typical in that respect. The
    people I know using Vonage are simply trying to save a few bucks
    compared to the local telco service.



    --

    "I don't need my cell phone to play video games or take pictures
    or double as a Walkie-Talkie; I just need it to work. Thanks for
    all the bells and whistles, but I could communicate better with
    ACTUAL bells and whistles." -Bill Maher 9/25/2003




  14. #14
    Thurman
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits


    "SMS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Larry <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> They're TOAST! My condolences to Vonage users stuck with useless
    >>> equipment once the company goes dark.

    >
    > Vonage provided a valuable service with its saturation advertising. It
    > made users aware of VOIP, and the ways it can be used. People that travel
    > a lot like these services since they can use VOIP to have a "local" phone
    > number when traveling, and use the hotel's free wireless for calls.
    >
    > However the problem was that a) Vonage was too expensive, and b) it had
    > little appeal outside the market for people that used it as a traveling
    > number type of service. Few people would ever spend anywhere close to
    > $25/month on long distance. That's 1000 minutes on OneSuite, 1250 minutes
    > on TalkLoop. And of course most people have unlimited off-peak long
    > distance on their cell phone plans.


    My Vonage is still working as well as ever. It provides me with an office
    number in a larger city 30 miles away that appears to be local for clients
    calling there. I received a text message for every person that left a
    message while in Florida for a week so no one knew I was away.

    The motivating factor of 'local' calling to Canada still works well as
    opposed to the $1.39/min SBC/ATT charged me for 90 minutes. ATT still tries
    to sell me bundled service but wants $0.32 per minute for calls to Costa
    Rica, but Vonage charges .02.

    In Friedman's book, The World is Flat, he points out bankruptcy leaves the
    infrastructure intact for someone else to use but at a lower cost. My
    Vonage/Linksys hardware and software are working fine. I'd prefer Vonage
    over Sprint to assume control based on business decisions of the last four
    years.

    Larry conveniently skipped the last paragraph of the article he quoted. The
    stock is recommended as a 'buy'.





  15. #15
    SMS
    Guest

    Re: Disney Mobile calls it Quits

    Thurman wrote:

    > My Vonage is still working as well as ever. It provides me with an office
    > number in a larger city 30 miles away that appears to be local for clients
    > calling there. I received a text message for every person that left a
    > message while in Florida for a week so no one knew I was away.


    Right, everyone I know with Vonage uses it the way you use it, a local
    number no matter where they actually are located, or while traveling.
    Their long distance rates are much higher than what's available
    elsewhere, unless you make a tremendous number of long distance calls,
    including international calls.



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