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  1. #1
    Big Drew
    Guest
    Here's just a bit of information about those requesting a list of
    numbers that were called. I've heard numerous times "I pay the bill",
    "It's my account, I made the calls" I've also heard reps give out the
    numbers like it was free information. Fact is, it IS against the
    law. Well Verizon gives me the numbers any time I want. If they do,
    they're violating federal law. Here's the proof. Take note, that the
    URL includes, FCC and dot GOV meaning, Federal Communications
    Commision, and that it's a government agency.

    http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/phoneaboutyou.html




    See More: Giving out calling records (ie, numbers you called or that called you)




  2. #2
    Wooly
    Guest

    Re: Giving out calling records (ie, numbers you called or that calledyou)

    Big Drew wrote:
    > Here's just a bit of information about those requesting a list of
    > numbers that were called. I've heard numerous times "I pay the bill",
    > "It's my account, I made the calls" I've also heard reps give out the
    > numbers like it was free information. Fact is, it IS against the
    > law. Well Verizon gives me the numbers any time I want. If they do,
    > they're violating federal law. Here's the proof. Take note, that the
    > URL includes, FCC and dot GOV meaning, Federal Communications
    > Commision, and that it's a government agency.
    >
    > http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/phoneaboutyou.html
    >


    If my name is on the account and I'm paying the bill I'm entitled to see
    the call records for any phone on the account. I don't check my
    husband's records and as far as I know he doesn't check mine - we're
    adults and we trust each other. We do monitor MINUTES CONSUMPTION, but
    that's not the same as doing call pattern analysis. We will for damned
    sure be checking our kids' call logs when they finally manage to cajole
    us into letting them have cellphones.

    Remember the bad old days of paper bills and detailed billing with page
    upon page of call records? I remember processing corporate accounts
    with as many as 300 phones on the account. Those bills were tens of
    thousands of paper pages with hundreds of thousands of call records, and
    we shipped them to the corporate customers in crates. Then we obtained
    microfiche technology in the data center so we could send multiple
    packets of 'fiche to those same customers. THEN we finally entered the
    electronic age and started sending those monstrous bills out
    electronically and we let the customers munge them to their hearts' content.



  3. #3
    dafydd
    Guest

    Re: Giving out calling records (ie, numbers you called or that called you)

    On Oct 31, 9:06 am, Wooly <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Big Drew wrote:
    > > Here's just a bit of information about those requesting a list of
    > > numbers that were called. I've heard numerous times "I pay the bill",
    > > "It's my account, I made the calls" I've also heard reps give out the
    > > numbers like it was free information. Fact is, it IS against the
    > > law. Well Verizon gives me the numbers any time I want. If they do,
    > > they're violating federal law. Here's the proof. Take note, that the
    > > URL includes, FCC and dot GOV meaning, Federal Communications
    > > Commision, and that it's a government agency.

    >
    > >http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/phoneaboutyou.html

    >
    > If my name is on the account and I'm paying the bill I'm entitled to see
    > the call records for any phone on the account. I don't check my
    > husband's records and as far as I know he doesn't check mine - we're
    > adults and we trust each other. We do monitor MINUTES CONSUMPTION, but
    > that's not the same as doing call pattern analysis. We will for damned
    > sure be checking our kids' call logs when they finally manage to cajole
    > us into letting them have cellphones.


    Thats all good in theory, and when you get your bill, or it is ready
    to be checked online, you can check those logs to your hearts content,
    just don't call in to care to try and check them, as we can get fired
    for releasing call details over the phone. Consumption is not a
    problem, I will gladly give you minutes of use all day, but that is
    pretty much where it has to stop by policy, and by federal regulation.




  4. #4
    Big Drew
    Guest

    Re: Giving out calling records (ie, numbers you called or that called you)

    Gone are the "Bad ol days" I wish we lived the the "Good 'ol days"
    still. That means I could live with out a cell phone, without text
    messaging and be totally happy. I'd have my pager and chose to call a
    number back if I wanted to. The fact is, as new technoligy is
    developed we, as a species, become spoiled to it and suddenly "Can't
    live without it." I'm glad because I now have a job because of it
    though.

    As far as who should be able to get the records and why, not to sound
    rude or anything, but take that up with the FCC. I'm not the powers
    that be, I just report to them.




  5. #5
    Wooly
    Guest

    Re: Giving out calling records (ie, numbers you called or that calledyou)

    dafydd wrote:

    >
    > Thats all good in theory, and when you get your bill, or it is ready
    > to be checked online, you can check those logs to your hearts content,
    > just don't call in to care to try and check them, as we can get fired
    > for releasing call details over the phone. Consumption is not a
    > problem, I will gladly give you minutes of use all day, but that is
    > pretty much where it has to stop by policy, and by federal regulation.
    >


    Exactly.

    It seems as if Cingular (with whom we no longer have service) had call
    records available online almost as soon as the call was made, but I am
    probably misremembering.

    Otherwise we wait for the bill to gen, just like good sheep



  6. #6
    Wooly
    Guest

    Re: Giving out calling records (ie, numbers you called or that calledyou)

    Big Drew wrote:
    > Gone are the "Bad ol days" I wish we lived the the "Good 'ol days"
    > still. That means I could live with out a cell phone, without text
    > messaging and be totally happy. I'd have my pager and chose to call a
    > number back if I wanted to. The fact is, as new technoligy is
    > developed we, as a species, become spoiled to it and suddenly "Can't
    > live without it."


    Amen to that. One of the few things I disliked about the "bad old days"
    was being an on-call geek. About the third time I got a 2am call and
    the company dial-up server was down, requiring me to put on clothing and
    go to the office to resolve a problem I told The Boss he'd give me a
    company cell phone or hire a couple of programmers specifically for
    graveyard.

    It turned out to be cheaper for the company to give me a cell, and thus
    began my downward spiral...



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