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  1. #1
    David G. Imber
    Guest
    On Sat, 16 Aug 2008 10:58:31 -0700, "mose" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I see many posts casting aspersions upon Sprint and I wonder how so
    >many can find fault. My experience with Sprint has been excellent and I
    >believe it will continue.
    >
    >I have been with Sprint over six years without any problem that has not
    >been quickly explained or corrected. While I am not a 'power' user as
    >many are the service has been excellent and forthcoming. My phones
    >are upgraded without charge when I request it and my plan cannot be
    >touched by any provider. I have three phones that are commonly used
    >by my wife and family in house and two vehicles and we seldom use
    >more that a third of applicable minutes. I pay by auto credit card, have
    >no problems in billing.
    >
    >Perhaps many of those having difficulties with Sprint are difficult to deal
    >with themselves or expect more from Sprint than could be expected or
    >outside their plan.


    I also had excellent experiences with Sprint, but had to leave
    it recently because, for reasons having nothing to do with service I
    decided to purchase iPhones. I was with Sprint for nine years prior to
    that.

    However, I have to say that customer service is indeed a HUGE
    and real problem. I used to dread calling them for ANYTHING. As long
    as your service is working and you make no changes you're fine. Sprint
    has a strong network that never failed me, no matter where I traveled.
    However, if you need to call CS to add a line or a service, or even
    get credit for something, the chances are EXTREMELY high that, like a
    house of cards, whatever you'd set up before will be completely
    disrupted, and you'll have to call back again and again to set things
    straight.

    Each time I renewed my contract I was offered decent
    incentives (more minutes, additional line at no charge, etc.). But
    each time I found myself calling CS repeatedly over the course of the
    next week, and each time I asked them to read back my plan there was
    some error, somewhere. What's more, the web page NEVER reflected the
    reality of my plans - not even close.

    Problems with CS are not a figment of anyone's imagination.
    Sprint's customer service is just a complete mess. But as I say, when
    things are properly configured you can pretty much hum along with
    flawless service (just praying you'll never have to deal with CS for
    anything critical and a bad time).

    DGI





    See More: Sprint service




  2. #2
    David G. Imber
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    On Tue, 19 Aug 2008 13:03:25 -0500, "trailer" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >David, I have to agree with just about all you said.
    >
    >My Sprint service has always been ok, but the CS stinks. I find it
    >difficult to understand why they cannot fix the CS problem.


    I had a friend who worked for Gateway in its heyday (not in
    CS). He explained that when a company is financially strapped to any
    extent, the customer service budget is going to be slashed. It's not
    sheer evil (though it feels like that). It's a cold, hard business
    decision to put more into R&D and production, with the earnest goal of
    alleviating or lessening the _need_ for CS. If you can make a more
    solid, fool-proof product that does what the consumer asks it to do
    consistently, you theoretically won't need as large a customer service
    force.

    On that model Sprint can be said to have succeeded to some
    degree.

    It's also interesting to note that this was corroborated by a
    book I read about the changing status of the American work force
    (sorry, I can't cite the name at the moment). It offered a case
    history of a large American corporation that devoted something like
    6.7% of its budget to CS, which was a pretty large force considering
    this corporate giant's overall budget. They had no problem supporting
    this work force until 1999, when the cost of health insurance started
    to rise dramatically. But they couldn't reduce the number of employees
    (because they made a product that required lots of customer
    interaction) so they had no choice but to close down their American CS
    department and open one in India. This was in 1999, and this was
    considered a pioneering event that many big corporations followed in
    the ensuing years.

    DGI



  3. #3
    DTC
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    David G. Imber wrote:
    > they had no choice but to close down their American CS
    > department and open one in India. This was in 1999, and this was
    > considered a pioneering event that many big corporations followed in
    > the ensuing years.


    Following the articles in the industry publications, the cost of
    off-shore (typically to India) has a hidden cost. Call it cultural bias,
    language comprehension, accent...whatever, the backlash from the
    American public has left a sour taste in tech support.



  4. #4
    Joel Koltner
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    My personal opinion is that the real problem with customer service call
    centers is that the employees simply don't know enough. And this isn't their
    fault -- I fully expect that they really do know everything their employer
    requires them too, just that the requirement is often little more than being
    able to read back a "troubleshooting" flowchart from a computer screen.

    If I were running Sprint's customer service, my goal would be to have all
    employees be as knowledgeable as those in Sprint's current "executive
    services" branch -- and I'd be confident that doing so wouldn't cost me
    significantly more than what I was already paying for what they already have.





  5. #5
    trailer
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    when I worked (now retired), I always felt like if you take care of your
    present customers, not only will they give you repeat business, but they
    will always give your company a good reference, which leads to new business.

    unfortunately, my last employer did not subscribe to good customer service.
    they no longer exist.

    "Joel Koltner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    My personal opinion is that the real problem with customer service call
    centers is that the employees simply don't know enough. And this isn't
    their
    fault -- I fully expect that they really do know everything their employer
    requires them too, just that the requirement is often little more than being
    able to read back a "troubleshooting" flowchart from a computer screen.

    If I were running Sprint's customer service, my goal would be to have all
    employees be as knowledgeable as those in Sprint's current "executive
    services" branch -- and I'd be confident that doing so wouldn't cost me
    significantly more than what I was already paying for what they already
    have.





  6. #6
    David G. Imber
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 09:59:43 -0700, "Joel Koltner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >If I were running Sprint's customer service, my goal would be to have all
    >employees be as knowledgeable as those in Sprint's current "executive
    >services" branch -- and I'd be confident that doing so wouldn't cost me
    >significantly more than what I was already paying for what they already have.


    I have dealt with executive services, and that would be great.
    But I think you'd be surprised at how that would affect the bottom
    line. For each worker there isn't just a wage, but insurance, worker's
    comp. etc. and it adds up to a lot. Particularly insurance.

    When I was recounting a particular problem to my Gateway
    friend I complained that I couldn't get anywhere with the first level
    CS people. He said that was because I was dealing with $4.95/hour
    workers and they really could be doing much simpler work for the same
    pay (this is like 11~12 years ago). But then I told him that even the
    higher level CS people seemed uncaring, and he said "yeah, then you're
    speaking to a $6.50 an hour person".

    I don't think it should make a difference, one should take
    pride in one's work whatever the comparative pay -- but I can
    understand what he was talking about. He said these things without any
    particular ill-will toward the people involved. It was just
    matter-of-fact.

    DGI



  7. #7
    Joel Koltner
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    "David G. Imber" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > But I think you'd be surprised at how that would affect the bottom
    > line.


    You might be right, although how many customers you gain or lose through good
    vs. mediocre or crappy customer service is difficult to measure.

    I also might underestimate how effective the oursourced customer service is...
    maybe they really do solve 90+% of peoples' problems in a timely and correct
    manner?

    > I don't think it should make a difference, one should take
    > pride in one's work whatever the comparative pay -- but I can
    > understand what he was talking about. He said these things without any
    > particular ill-will toward the people involved. It was just
    > matter-of-fact.


    Agreed.

    I do think advertising something along the lines of, "we pay our customer
    service personnel good, 'living' wages, so while we're not the cheapest
    service available, we are the best" can be effective... when it's all true.

    ---Joel





  8. #8
    Joel Koltner
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > the reps get paied at best 10 an hour with minimal to no benifits why take
    > the time to get to know the products:


    Because *some* people still take great pride in what they do, *regardless* of
    how much (or how little) they're being paid to do it. Not to mention that
    even at near-minimum-wage jobs there's often a great deal of variation from
    job to job in how "interesting" any given person finds the work.

    I spent my undergraduate college years working as a generic "student hourly"
    for a bunch of materials sciences grad students. I designed and built power
    supplies, microcontroller circuits, wrote plenty of software, and also learned
    how to run a milling machine and a lathe. While I didn't make any more money
    than if I'd been, e.g., flipping burgers, it was an immensely more interesting
    and useful experience. (And it's not like I could have found any other jobs
    paying much better either, been in school full time and all...)

    Finding these sort of "win-win" situations is what good hiring managers are
    supposed to do: Maybe the competitive market just doesn't allow you to pay
    that much money to your employees, but of those who are willing to work for
    what you can afford, there's still a huge variation in how well they'll
    perform. Better still, paying "a little more" than the competition can often
    garner "a lot more" productivity and benefits from your employees -- if,
    again, you choose them wisely.

    I've seen many small businesses -- paying "decent" (e.g., >$15/hr) wages --
    where it's clear to me that, if better employees had been hired, only, say,
    2/3 would be needed. So... pay those employees $20/hr and you're still ahead
    of the game! (Since $15*3/2 = $22.50 -- employees make more money, employer
    spends less, everyone wins.)

    There's little more detrimental to an employee's livelihood and career than
    taking a job where the bulk of the employees are "just average."

    ---Joel





  9. #9
    The Bob
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    "Joel Koltner" <[email protected]> amazed us all with the
    following in news:[email protected]:

    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> the reps get paied at best 10 an hour with minimal to no benifits why
    >> take the time to get to know the products:

    >
    > Because *some* people still take great pride in what they do,
    > *regardless* of how much (or how little) they're being paid to do it.



    I would agree, but qualify that statement by saying that the *some*
    referenced continues to represent a smaller and smaller percentage of the
    american working class as time goes by.



  10. #10
    Joel Koltner
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    "The Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I would agree, but qualify that statement by saying that the *some*
    > referenced continues to represent a smaller and smaller percentage of the
    > american working class as time goes by.


    Yeah, I suppose I'd have to agree with that sentiment.

    It's too bad that so many people can't see that, in the long run, "I'll do as
    little for my employer and fellow man as I can possibly get away with" is
    worse for the individual as well.





  11. #11
    TheGist
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    > I do think advertising something along the lines of, "we pay our customer
    > service personnel good, 'living' wages, so while we're not the cheapest
    > service available, we are the best" can be effective... when it's all true.


    I was recently in the market for a new ISP and chose the one who
    advertised that they specifically do *not* offshore their tech support.
    I expect to call their tech support just about *never* but am happy to
    reward a company behaving in a socially responsible way.



  12. #12
    Crayonsetc
    Guest

    Re: Sprint service

    > My experience with Sprint has been excellent and I
    > believe it will continue. I have been with Sprint over six years without any problem that has not
    > been quickly explained or corrected. *



    I have been with Sprint for over 5 years. I have always had great
    service. In April, I went on a retreat up in the mountains, I had
    service, no one else did. The only reason I ever considered switching
    is that I use my phone more like a PDA than a phone (although I do
    talk a lot too!!), and I own a Mac... so I wanted a phone I could sync
    with my computer. So last month, I made the decision to break my
    contract and go to AT&T and get an iPhone. I didn't like the idea of
    AT&T and within 6 days, I made the choice to cancel my service and go
    back to Sprint. It was the best decision. I told my dh, that I might
    not be 100% happy with any phone, but I have to like the network.
    Until Apple looses their exclusive contract with AT&T, I won't be
    going back to an iPhone!!! (on top of the fact that I live in a large
    city and can't get service IN MY HOUSE... the map showed us being in
    'moderate' coverage from about a half mile east of us to a half mile
    west of us and about a mile south... UGH!!)

    I have a few places where we have holes, and drop calls, but for the
    most part, I know where most of them are and I Love sprint!!! (there
    is a tower for another company in the school parking lot and my
    friends with that company still can't get service in their home.... I
    am back and here to stay!!!

    As for my phone, I got the instinct... and still trying to figure out
    how to get around the lack of Mac support, but google does sync with
    my Mac, if only I could get the phone to not crash every time I try
    and open my calendar!!!



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