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  1. #1
    Captain
    Guest
    anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I know you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the geography deal, can it only be in your state or state to state even? any limitations?



    See More: number portability




  2. #2
    tom ronson
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    I'd think the L in WLNP means Local ---- Im' sure one of the telco aces in the forum can tell you what that means, but interstate isn't part of the deal. I'd think you could look at area codes and take it from there for starters.
    "Captain" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I know you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the geography deal, can it only be in your state or state to state even? any limitations?



  3. #3
    Phillipe
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Captain" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I know
    > you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the geography deal,
    > can it only be in your state or state to state even? any limitations?



    I assume they prefer (require?) it to be within the mapped zone of the
    area code, although the new IP phone companies have no restrictions.



  4. #4
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    Captain <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [-- text/plain, encoding quoted-printable, charset: iso-8859-1, 4 lines --]
    >
    > anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I
    > know you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the
    > geography deal, can it only be in your state or state to state even?
    > any limitations?


    Don't expect to be able to move into another area code and keep the
    same number and have it be local to your new location.


    This is Wireless LOCAL number portability we're talking about.

    (This may be obvious, but I thought I'd point it out just in case.)

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & Multimedia Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



  5. #5
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    Phillipe <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Captain" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I know
    >> you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the geography deal,
    >> can it only be in your state or state to state even? any limitations?

    >
    >
    > I assume they prefer (require?) it to be within the mapped zone of the
    > area code, although the new IP phone companies have no restrictions.


    Um... the IP telephony providers can only provide local numbers in areas
    where they have contracted with another company who provides those numbers,
    or where they have equipment installed in phone companies' local facilities.
    I am looking into providing an IP-based phone service and that is one of the
    things we're looking at - providing lots of local exchanges without having
    to locate equipment at each telco CO where we want to do so.

    But you're right - the numbers won't be portable across area codes or LATAs.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & Multimedia Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



  6. #6
    David Gunter
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    Strictly local.

    However, when deciding the last requirements for local number portability,
    the FCC defined geographical portability but decided not to pursue it.
    Hopefully it will come at some point in the future and do away with area
    codes once and for all.

    Geographic portability would allow, for example, a customer living in
    Chicago to move to New York and keep his same phone number yet make New York
    is local calling area (for billing purposes, etc). People within New York
    dialing that number would be making a local phone call while those back in
    Chicago would be making a long distance call.

    The FCC didnąt pursue it further because they donąt think the public can
    handle it at this time.

    -david

    On 8/13/03 7:59 AM, in article [email protected], "Captain"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I know
    > you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the geography deal,
    > can it only be in your state or state to state even? any limitations?
    >



    --
    Replace spam with david in the email address if you really want to send
    email to me.





  7. #7
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    Re: number portabilityFirst off ... HTML posting stinks in newsgroups.
    Phew. No I have to toppost because I don't want to manually comment out all
    of your text.

    Anyway, geographic portability as you suggest, would be a nightmare for you
    and I and a scammers delight. There would be no way to know that you are
    calling a local number, simply by looking at the number. This will become a
    real pain. The only way it could work, IMHO, is for domestic long distance
    to simply go away. Everything would be local in the USA.

    Tom Veldhouse


    "David Gunter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BB5FBF78.546E4%[email protected]
    Strictly local.

    However, when deciding the last requirements for local number portability,
    the FCC defined geographical portability but decided not to pursue it.
    Hopefully it will come at some point in the future and do away with area
    codes once and for all.

    Geographic portability would allow, for example, a customer living in
    Chicago to move to New York and keep his same phone number yet make New York
    is local calling area (for billing purposes, etc). People within New York
    dialing that number would be making a local phone call while those back in
    Chicago would be making a long distance call.

    The FCC didn't pursue it further because they don't think the public can
    handle it at this time.

    -david

    On 8/13/03 7:59 AM, in article [email protected], "Captain"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I know
    you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the geography deal,
    can it only be in your state or state to state even? any limitations?




    --
    Replace spam with david in the email address if you really want to send
    email to me.





  8. #8
    Carl.
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    Top-poster! Top-poster! Neener neener neener!

    "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Re: number portabilityFirst off ... HTML posting stinks in newsgroups.
    > Phew. No I have to toppost because I don't want to manually comment out

    all
    > of your text.
    >
    > Anyway, geographic portability as you suggest, would be a nightmare for

    you
    > and I and a scammers delight. There would be no way to know that you are
    > calling a local number, simply by looking at the number. This will become

    a
    > real pain. The only way it could work, IMHO, is for domestic long

    distance
    > to simply go away. Everything would be local in the USA.
    >
    > Tom Veldhouse
    >
    >
    > "David Gunter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BB5FBF78.546E4%[email protected]
    > Strictly local.
    >
    > However, when deciding the last requirements for local number portability,
    > the FCC defined geographical portability but decided not to pursue it.
    > Hopefully it will come at some point in the future and do away with area
    > codes once and for all.
    >
    > Geographic portability would allow, for example, a customer living in
    > Chicago to move to New York and keep his same phone number yet make New

    York
    > is local calling area (for billing purposes, etc). People within New York
    > dialing that number would be making a local phone call while those back in
    > Chicago would be making a long distance call.
    >
    > The FCC didn't pursue it further because they don't think the public can
    > handle it at this time.
    >
    > -david
    >
    > On 8/13/03 7:59 AM, in article [email protected],

    "Captain"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I

    know
    > you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the geography

    deal,
    > can it only be in your state or state to state even? any limitations?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Replace spam with david in the email address if you really want to send
    > email to me.
    >
    >



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.509 / Virus Database: 306 - Release Date: 8/12/2003





  9. #9
    Jerome Zelinske
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    I thought the L was for Line.


    Steven J Sobol wrote:
    > Captain <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>[-- text/plain, encoding quoted-printable, charset: iso-8859-1, 4 lines --]
    >>
    >>anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise, I
    >>know you can go from a carrier to another carrier but what is the
    >>geography deal, can it only be in your state or state to state even?
    >>any limitations?

    >
    >
    > Don't expect to be able to move into another area code and keep the
    > same number and have it be local to your new location.
    >
    >
    > This is Wireless LOCAL number portability we're talking about.
    >
    > (This may be obvious, but I thought I'd point it out just in case.)
    >





  10. #10
    Steven J Sobol
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    Phillipe <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The only way it could work, IMHO, is for domestic long distance
    >> to simply go away. Everything would be local in the USA.

    >
    > We're almost there, with most cell carriers allowing free long distance
    > on all calls, and SBC offering unlimited longdistance for their
    > landlines at $19.99/month.


    Not here, it's much more - but SBC here in SoCal offers unlimited flat-rate
    domestic and local calling in the areas they server here, and so does Verizon.

    They can't roll it out everywhere all at once due to regulatory issues (to
    change rates, you have to file new tarriffs), but they're doing it.

    Verizon, my landline provider, even includes calls to Canada in their package.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & Multimedia Services
    22674 Motnocab Road * Apple Valley, CA 92307-1950
    Steve Sobol, Proprietor
    888.480.4NET (4638) * 248.724.4NET * [email protected]



  11. #11
    Phillipe
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Steven J Sobol <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Phillipe <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Thomas T. Veldhouse" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> The only way it could work, IMHO, is for domestic long distance
    > >> to simply go away. Everything would be local in the USA.

    > >
    > > We're almost there, with most cell carriers allowing free long distance
    > > on all calls, and SBC offering unlimited longdistance for their
    > > landlines at $19.99/month.

    >
    > Not here, it's much more - but SBC here in SoCal offers unlimited flat-rate
    > domestic and local calling in the areas they server here, and so does Verizon.
    >
    > They can't roll it out everywhere all at once due to regulatory issues (to
    > change rates, you have to file new tarriffs), but they're doing it.
    >
    > Verizon, my landline provider, even includes calls to Canada in their package.


    I can't for the life of me imagine a reason why anyone would want to
    call Canada.



  12. #12
    norelpref
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    On Wed, 13 Aug 2003 08:59:24 -0500, "Captain" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >anyone know the range for number portability? I mean geogrpahy wise


    Two miles past the last tree on the east side of the city, and three
    miles on the west. The difference in mileage is to compensate for
    the doppler shift of the radio frequencies do to the earths rotation.

    No really, I would GUESS that you would have to have a number that is
    within the new carriers service area boundary before they could take
    your number. I doubt that would be a technical limit though. That
    makes it a little difficult as that "defined" region will vary greatly
    between carriers. An obvious boundrary would be a state line but does
    Cingular have the same Washington/Baltimore area as Sprint or Verizon?





  13. #13
    Phillipe
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    In article <[email protected]>,
    norelpref <[email protected]> wrote:

    > does
    > Cingular have the same Washington/Baltimore area as Sprint or Verizon?


    10 Feet either side of I95?



  14. #14
    Thomas T. Veldhouse
    Guest

    Re: number portability


    "Phillipe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    >
    > I can't for the life of me imagine a reason why anyone would want to
    > call Canada.


    It is cheaper than driving there.

    Tom Veldhouse





  15. #15
    Captain
    Guest

    Re: number portability

    so does that mean I couldn't move say to the northern part of my state and
    take my number with because the area changes? Or can I move there but keep
    the number in the same area code just live somewhere else?

    Not sure I see the number portability charge as valid then if you're so
    restricted.
    "Phillipe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > norelpref <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > does
    > > Cingular have the same Washington/Baltimore area as Sprint or Verizon?

    >
    > 10 Feet either side of I95?






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