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  1. #1
    ZJ Driver
    Guest

    "Phillipe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    > In article <fUA%[email protected]>,
    > "ZJ Driver" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Not uncommon at director and senior management/executive levels...
    > >
    > > Try a different job...

    >
    > That doesn't make it right or fair.


    You're missing the big picture. The compensation packages at this level are
    highly dependent on bonuses. You produce, you get your whole salary, you
    break even, you get the base package, you don't produce, you're out on your
    ass. In general the decisions and actions at this level are company
    encompassing and can be influenced by many people you have no direct control
    over. Other people, who aren't in the same bonus tiers, have "tell me what
    to do and let me go home" type jobs. They make a living comensurate with
    their responsibility.

    I'm guessing you've never been in a position with that level or
    responsibility and accountability?

    High risk, high reward, it's the name of the game. Don't like it? Don't
    think it's fair? Start your own business and run it your way.





    See More: Why Sprint is raising rates.




  2. #2
    Phillipe
    Guest

    Re: Why Sprint is raising rates.

    In article <arE%[email protected]>,
    "ZJ Driver" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Phillipe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]
    > > In article <fUA%[email protected]>,
    > > "ZJ Driver" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Not uncommon at director and senior management/executive levels...
    > > >
    > > > Try a different job...

    > >
    > > That doesn't make it right or fair.

    >
    > You're missing the big picture. The compensation packages at this level are
    > highly dependent on bonuses. You produce, you get your whole salary, you
    > break even, you get the base package, you don't produce, you're out on your
    > ass. In general the decisions and actions at this level are company
    > encompassing and can be influenced by many people you have no direct control
    > over. Other people, who aren't in the same bonus tiers, have "tell me what
    > to do and let me go home" type jobs. They make a living comensurate with
    > their responsibility.


    You didnt read the contract. He is guaranteed a bonus of 150% of Base
    Salary regardless of performance or profitability.



  3. #3
    Nomen Nescio
    Guest

    Re: Why Sprint is raising rates.


    >You're missing the big picture. The compensation packages at this level are
    >highly dependent on bonuses. You produce, you get your whole salary, you
    >break even, you get the base package, you don't produce, you're out on your
    >ass.



    Bonuses are usually based on shareholder value.

    When the shareholder see s dramatic increase, then the executives should naturally get a little
    something extra.

    What have the shareholders seen over the past couple of years?

    How are you quantifying this "production"? It isn't hitting the balance sheet, so obviously you
    are using another yardstick to measure job performance.

    I'm just curious which yardstick you are using. Heck, I bet a whole bunch of people wonder which
    yardstick you are using.


    >I'm guessing you've never been in a position with that level or
    >responsibility and accountability?


    I'm guessing he has, since he knows how to quantify job performance.

    What level of responsibility and accountability have you been in where an 80% depreciation in
    shareholder values is considered doing "a good job"?

    Seriously, I want to know so I can steer any assets away from this company that you are an
    executive of. Talk about low standards. From $30/share to $5/share = Bonus Worthy? Yikes!




  4. #4
    Lawrence G. Mayka
    Guest

    Re: Why Sprint is raising rates.

    "ZJ Driver" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:arE%[email protected]
    > You're missing the big picture. The compensation packages at this level are
    > highly dependent on bonuses. You produce, you get your whole salary, you
    > break even, you get the base package, you don't produce, you're out on your
    > ass. In general the decisions and actions at this level are company
    > encompassing and can be influenced by many people you have no direct control
    > over. Other people, who aren't in the same bonus tiers, have "tell me what
    > to do and let me go home" type jobs. They make a living comensurate with
    > their responsibility.
    >
    > I'm guessing you've never been in a position with that level or
    > responsibility and accountability?
    >
    > High risk, high reward, it's the name of the game. Don't like it? Don't
    > think it's fair? Start your own business and run it your way.


    Your view of corporate salaries is quaintly naive. Executives of even the
    worst-run companies (e.g., Lucent Technologies) are guaranteed enormous amounts
    of money, regardless of how the company fares. If the company does well (e.g.,
    due to an economic bubble), the executive takes full credit and gets an enormous
    bonus and pay raise. If the company does badly, the executive "makes the tough
    decision" to fire or outsource tens of thousands of employees, and again gets a
    fat bonus, and even a large "retention incentive" to stay. (As if a company can
    solve its problems by encouraging the executives who caused the problems to
    continue wreaking their damage!) If the company continues to spiral downward,
    the executive eventually is "let go"--but with an enormous "contract settlement"
    moneypot, a fat pension, "forgiven" loans, etc.

    Your phrase "high risk, high reward" is particularly absurd because you seem to
    think that ordinary workers take few risks. If you had worked at Lucent and you
    were one of the tens of thousands who were terminated, you would know better.

    Keep in mind that after years of corporate shrinkage, Lucent recently announced
    that, contrary to promises, it will not achieve profitability this year either.
    Maybe next year, Lucent executives said.





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