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  1. #1
    Freewheeling
    Guest
    Hi:

    I know this is wildly off topic, but was wondering if someone knows a
    tutorial on the licensing of phone services in Iraq. I understand that the
    Coalition Provisional Authority has established three regional licenses for
    a short two year period. Naturally I've had people tell me that this is
    "undemocratic" to not give the Iraqis themselves the opportunity to choose
    the provider. But it appears to me that by setting up two-year licenses
    they're doing just that. Is there something I don't know about? Is there
    some sort of "lock in" to a specific technology, making it difficult for
    other providers (say, from Kuwait) to compete in the digital phone market
    later? Are there bandwidth issues? This stuff is way beyond me, and I was
    hoping some of you geniuses have some insights. What are the ins and outs
    of this situation, and the bottom line?



    --
    --Scott
    [email protected]
    Cut the "tail" to send email.






    See More: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq




  2. #2
    Hopper
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq


    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi:
    >
    > I know this is wildly off topic, but was wondering if someone knows a
    > tutorial on the licensing of phone services in Iraq. I understand that

    the
    > Coalition Provisional Authority has established three regional licenses

    for
    > a short two year period. Naturally I've had people tell me that this is
    > "undemocratic" to not give the Iraqis themselves the opportunity to choose
    > the provider. But it appears to me that by setting up two-year licenses
    > they're doing just that. Is there something I don't know about? Is there
    > some sort of "lock in" to a specific technology, making it difficult for
    > other providers (say, from Kuwait) to compete in the digital phone market
    > later? Are there bandwidth issues? This stuff is way beyond me, and I

    was
    > hoping some of you geniuses have some insights. What are the ins and outs
    > of this situation, and the bottom line?
    >



    Read this first:
    "Bahrain Telephone brings cell phone service to Iraq; U.S. shuts it down so
    it can bid out the contract "

    http://www.underreported.com/modules...rder=0&thold=0

    Same link, but shorter:
    http://tinyurl.com/kdkj

    Hopper






  3. #3
    Maokh
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq


    Might as well have called it the Iraqi Pirate Cellular Co ...

    although GSM cellular service in Iraq was nice, no government or interm
    government is going to let random companies squat on frequencies and
    bands they don't own licenses for.

    --
    Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap




  4. #4
    Freewheeling
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq

    Hopper:

    Thanks for the response. This is sort of what I'd heard, but there's a lot
    left unsaid. For instance:

    " The U.S.-led authority in Iraq -- which wants to hold a bid for three
    regional mobile phone licenses -- asked Batelco to shut down. A renegade
    service provider could throw a wrench into its plans for a tender for the
    licenses, among the most potentially lucrative contracts to be offered in
    Iraq. "

    What does "potentially" mean? Every business opportunity is potentially
    lucrative, but my take on this is that the original licensees would have to
    build a lot of infrastructure and then just wave bye bye in two years. Big
    capital investment, and not much time to recoup. I can also understand,
    given the peculiarities of the business, that it might be counterproductive
    to have a spoiler like the Kuwaiti company around. But I admit I just don't
    know much about this situation. The bottom line, I guess, is that
    ultimately Iraqis would be able to make some informed decisions about what
    sort of cell phone system they require. By the way, was the Kurdish
    provider shut down too? There's an established provider in the Kurdish
    area, so will they let that company coexist?

    --
    --Scott
    [email protected]
    Cut the "tail" to send email.


    "Hopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:R080b.181098$o%[email protected]
    >
    > "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi:
    > >
    > > I know this is wildly off topic, but was wondering if someone knows a
    > > tutorial on the licensing of phone services in Iraq. I understand that

    > the
    > > Coalition Provisional Authority has established three regional licenses

    > for
    > > a short two year period. Naturally I've had people tell me that this is
    > > "undemocratic" to not give the Iraqis themselves the opportunity to

    choose
    > > the provider. But it appears to me that by setting up two-year licenses
    > > they're doing just that. Is there something I don't know about? Is

    there
    > > some sort of "lock in" to a specific technology, making it difficult for
    > > other providers (say, from Kuwait) to compete in the digital phone

    market
    > > later? Are there bandwidth issues? This stuff is way beyond me, and I

    > was
    > > hoping some of you geniuses have some insights. What are the ins and

    outs
    > > of this situation, and the bottom line?
    > >

    >
    >
    > Read this first:
    > "Bahrain Telephone brings cell phone service to Iraq; U.S. shuts it down

    so
    > it can bid out the contract "
    >
    >

    http://www.underreported.com/modules...file=article&s
    id=1089&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0
    >
    > Same link, but shorter:
    > http://tinyurl.com/kdkj
    >
    > Hopper
    >
    >
    >






  5. #5
    Joe Burke
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq

    Maybe VZW will get the contract and create an "Iraqi's Choice" plan.

    Joe

    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hopper:
    >
    > Thanks for the response. This is sort of what I'd heard, but there's a

    lot
    > left unsaid. For instance:
    >
    > " The U.S.-led authority in Iraq -- which wants to hold a bid for three
    > regional mobile phone licenses -- asked Batelco to shut down. A renegade
    > service provider could throw a wrench into its plans for a tender for the
    > licenses, among the most potentially lucrative contracts to be offered in
    > Iraq. "
    >
    > What does "potentially" mean? Every business opportunity is potentially
    > lucrative, but my take on this is that the original licensees would have

    to
    > build a lot of infrastructure and then just wave bye bye in two years.

    Big
    > capital investment, and not much time to recoup. I can also understand,
    > given the peculiarities of the business, that it might be

    counterproductive
    > to have a spoiler like the Kuwaiti company around. But I admit I just

    don't
    > know much about this situation. The bottom line, I guess, is that
    > ultimately Iraqis would be able to make some informed decisions about what
    > sort of cell phone system they require. By the way, was the Kurdish
    > provider shut down too? There's an established provider in the Kurdish
    > area, so will they let that company coexist?
    >
    > --
    > --Scott
    > [email protected]
    > Cut the "tail" to send email.
    >
    >
    > "Hopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:R080b.181098$o%[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > Hi:
    > > >
    > > > I know this is wildly off topic, but was wondering if someone knows a
    > > > tutorial on the licensing of phone services in Iraq. I understand

    that
    > > the
    > > > Coalition Provisional Authority has established three regional

    licenses
    > > for
    > > > a short two year period. Naturally I've had people tell me that this

    is
    > > > "undemocratic" to not give the Iraqis themselves the opportunity to

    > choose
    > > > the provider. But it appears to me that by setting up two-year

    licenses
    > > > they're doing just that. Is there something I don't know about? Is

    > there
    > > > some sort of "lock in" to a specific technology, making it difficult

    for
    > > > other providers (say, from Kuwait) to compete in the digital phone

    > market
    > > > later? Are there bandwidth issues? This stuff is way beyond me, and

    I
    > > was
    > > > hoping some of you geniuses have some insights. What are the ins and

    > outs
    > > > of this situation, and the bottom line?
    > > >

    > >
    > >
    > > Read this first:
    > > "Bahrain Telephone brings cell phone service to Iraq; U.S. shuts it down

    > so
    > > it can bid out the contract "
    > >
    > >

    >

    http://www.underreported.com/modules...file=article&s
    > id=1089&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0
    > >
    > > Same link, but shorter:
    > > http://tinyurl.com/kdkj
    > >
    > > Hopper
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >






  6. #6
    Just Blaze
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq

    HA HA... classic.

    "Joe Burke" <[email protected]> wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    > Maybe VZW will get the contract and create an "Iraqi's Choice" plan.
    >
    > Joe
    >
    > "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hopper:
    > >
    > > Thanks for the response. This is sort of what I'd heard, but there's a

    > lot
    > > left unsaid. For instance:
    > >
    > > " The U.S.-led authority in Iraq -- which wants to hold a bid for three
    > > regional mobile phone licenses -- asked Batelco to shut down. A renegade
    > > service provider could throw a wrench into its plans for a tender for the
    > > licenses, among the most potentially lucrative contracts to be offered in
    > > Iraq. "
    > >
    > > What does "potentially" mean? Every business opportunity is potentially
    > > lucrative, but my take on this is that the original licensees would have

    > to
    > > build a lot of infrastructure and then just wave bye bye in two years.

    > Big
    > > capital investment, and not much time to recoup. I can also understand,
    > > given the peculiarities of the business, that it might be

    > counterproductive
    > > to have a spoiler like the Kuwaiti company around. But I admit I just

    > don't
    > > know much about this situation. The bottom line, I guess, is that
    > > ultimately Iraqis would be able to make some informed decisions about what
    > > sort of cell phone system they require. By the way, was the Kurdish
    > > provider shut down too? There's an established provider in the Kurdish
    > > area, so will they let that company coexist?
    > >
    > > --
    > > --Scott
    > > [email protected]
    > > Cut the "tail" to send email.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Hopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:R080b.181098$o%[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > > Hi:
    > > > >
    > > > > I know this is wildly off topic, but was wondering if someone knows a
    > > > > tutorial on the licensing of phone services in Iraq. I understand

    > that
    > > > the
    > > > > Coalition Provisional Authority has established three regional

    > licenses
    > > > for
    > > > > a short two year period. Naturally I've had people tell me that this

    > is
    > > > > "undemocratic" to not give the Iraqis themselves the opportunity to

    > > choose
    > > > > the provider. But it appears to me that by setting up two-year

    > licenses
    > > > > they're doing just that. Is there something I don't know about? Is

    > > there
    > > > > some sort of "lock in" to a specific technology, making it difficult

    > for
    > > > > other providers (say, from Kuwait) to compete in the digital phone

    > > market
    > > > > later? Are there bandwidth issues? This stuff is way beyond me, and

    > I
    > > > was
    > > > > hoping some of you geniuses have some insights. What are the ins and

    > > outs
    > > > > of this situation, and the bottom line?
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Read this first:
    > > > "Bahrain Telephone brings cell phone service to Iraq; U.S. shuts it down

    > > so
    > > > it can bid out the contract "
    > > >
    > > >

    > >

    > http://www.underreported.com/modules...file=article&s
    > > id=1089&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0
    > > >
    > > > Same link, but shorter:
    > > > http://tinyurl.com/kdkj
    > > >
    > > > Hopper
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com - free web access to the alt.cellular groups]



  7. #7
    Maokh
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq


    ....the united states was trying to push CDMA above the "french GSM
    standard" a while back .... that would be funny to see a CDMA carrier
    over there.

    Maybe we'll see Iraqi's choice afterall

    --
    Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap




  8. #8
    Freewheeling
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq

    What are the advantages/disadvantages of GSM vs CDMA?

    --
    --Scott
    [email protected]
    Cut the "tail" to send email.


    "Maokh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > ...the united states was trying to push CDMA above the "french GSM
    > standard" a while back .... that would be funny to see a CDMA carrier
    > over there.
    >
    > Maybe we'll see Iraqi's choice afterall
    >
    > --
    > Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    > Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap
    >






  9. #9
    letsgoflyers81
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq


    Freewheeling wrote:
    > *What are the advantages/disadvantages of GSM vs CDMA?
    >
    > --
    > --Scott
    > [email protected]
    > Cut the "tail" to send email.
    >
    > *



    CDMA has much faster data capabilities with its 1xRTT. Currently, the
    average is about 50-70 kbps and peak is 144 kbps. GSM/GPRS is only
    half as fast, peaking around 70 kbps.

    GSM and its GPRS data is always on which is not the case with CDMA.
    When you turm the phone on, data isn't instantly on, you have to
    connect to it. Once you're in you can stay in and leave it idle, but
    it can become disconnected for a variety of reasons. GPRS is truly
    always on like a cable modem connection. From the second your phone's
    on, data is on. Also, with CDMA, you can't receive calls while
    actively transferring data. If you're connected and transferring,
    calls with go straight to e-mail. With GPRS, you'll be prompted and
    you can choose to take the call or not.

    GSM phones use a SIM card and CDMA phones do not. A SIM card contains
    all the information that confirms who you are to the network. If you
    get a new phone, just pop the card out, pop it in the new phone, and
    you're good to go. With CDMA, you need to call your carrier and have
    them change your ESN which can be inconvenient.

    GSM isn't inferior to CDMA (other than transfer speeds) per say, but it
    hasn't been implemented well in the United States. AT&T, Cingular, and
    T-Mobile have been patched together from mergers of smaller carriers so
    they don't have the coverage or reliability that Sprint has because it
    was built "from the ground up." Verizon was pieced together, but they
    seem to have things set up better than the CSM carriers. If GSM was
    set up here as carefully as it was in Europe, it could be just as good
    and reliable as CDMA.

    There's isn't any clear winner or loser on which is better. You have
    to look each particular carrier and their coverage in your area,
    pricing plans, and data capability and decide what meets your needs.

    Do a search if you want detailed information, those are the basics:

    --
    Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap




  10. #10
    Freewheeling
    Guest

    Re: A question about wireless phone service in Iraq

    Thanks for the tutorial. It's hard to keep track of this stuff.

    --
    --Scott
    [email protected]
    Cut the "tail" to send email.
    <<details snipped>>





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