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  1. #1
    Sergei Kosonov
    Guest
    In article <[email protected]>,
    TechGeek <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Eric wrote:
    > > *Ok, was just curious. They would always ask me my name and user
    > > password and pause before speaking again. I just assumed that they
    > > had
    > > to enter in the info before their systems would give them your
    > > account
    > > information.
    > >
    > > Learn something new everyday.
    > >
    > > Eric *

    >
    > On my end of the system, I can search several ways, including name,
    > phone number, account number, customer ID (usualy social security
    > number). The list shows me the name, beginning of the address,
    > customer ID#, account# and a phone number if its a single line.
    >
    > I don't need a password to get into the account,



    So whatever Sprint posts on its website about security of your personal
    informnation is in error, to put it politely.



    See More: SPRINT and privacy




  2. #2
    ben dejo
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy

    If you have a malicious employee at Sprint, he can get all of your
    information, yes.

    Sergei Kosonov <[email protected]> wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > TechGeek <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Eric wrote:
    > > > *Ok, was just curious. They would always ask me my name and user
    > > > password and pause before speaking again. I just assumed that they
    > > > had
    > > > to enter in the info before their systems would give them your
    > > > account
    > > > information.
    > > >
    > > > Learn something new everyday.
    > > >
    > > > Eric *

    > >
    > > On my end of the system, I can search several ways, including name,
    > > phone number, account number, customer ID (usualy social security
    > > number). The list shows me the name, beginning of the address,
    > > customer ID#, account# and a phone number if its a single line.
    > >
    > > I don't need a password to get into the account,

    >
    >
    > So whatever Sprint posts on its website about security of your personal
    > informnation is in error, to put it politely.


    [posted via phonescoop.com]



  3. #3
    Sergei Kosonov
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy

    In article <[email protected]>,
    direcció[email protected] (ben dejo) wrote:

    > If you have a malicious employee at Sprint, he can get all of your
    > information, yes.


    Could be a malicious cousin or a malicious co-worker of the valued
    employee who has the authority. Only the Bonded Network/Database Manager
    whould have that authority.



  4. #4
    Sergei Kosonov
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy



    [email protected] (Brandt ) wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    > I work for a temp agency,


    >> although my father is a VP at sprint and is my

    > source of info.



    Wonderful source of leaks at Sprint. A VP whose son is
    a wanna be hero on a USENET newsgroup.



  5. #5
    ben dejo
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy

    If they were allowed access to the database. Most people would go
    throught the billing system to retrieve this information. Which every
    employee at Sprint (who are actually employed by Sprint, Brant) has
    access to.

    Sergei Kosonov <[email protected]> wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > direcció[email protected] (ben dejo) wrote:
    >
    > > If you have a malicious employee at Sprint, he can get all of your
    > > information, yes.

    >
    > Could be a malicious cousin or a malicious co-worker of the valued
    > employee who has the authority. Only the Bonded Network/Database Manager
    > whould have that authority.


    [posted via phonescoop.com]



  6. #6
    Sergei Kosonov
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy

    In article <[email protected]>,
    direcció[email protected] (ben dejo) wrote:

    > If they were allowed access to the database. Most people would go
    > throught the billing system to retrieve this information. Which every
    > employee at Sprint (who are actually employed by Sprint, Brant) has
    > access to.


    But normally folks would would need a pass code. Apparently Sprint too
    freely gives Carte Blanche. Or is it all a charade when a CSR asks for
    your passcode?



  7. #7
    Big Poppa
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy

    When a Sprint CSR Ask for your password, it is to just verify you are
    who you say you are.. It is not needed for the CSR to access your
    account, but to insure they are speaking to the account holder... It's
    the same for every celluar company. Its just for verification not for
    the rep to access the account.

    --
    SAVE YOUR BREATH....

    You'll need it to blow up your date.


    Sergei Kosonov <[email protected]> wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > direcció[email protected] (ben dejo) wrote:
    >
    > > If they were allowed access to the database. Most people would go
    > > throught the billing system to retrieve this information. Which every
    > > employee at Sprint (who are actually employed by Sprint, Brant) has
    > > access to.

    >
    > But normally folks would would need a pass code. Apparently Sprint too
    > freely gives Carte Blanche. Or is it all a charade when a CSR asks for
    > your passcode?


    [posted via phonescoop.com]



  8. #8
    ben dejo
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy

    That is about right.

    [email protected] (Big Poppa) wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    > When a Sprint CSR Ask for your password, it is to just verify you are
    > who you say you are.. It is not needed for the CSR to access your
    > account, but to insure they are speaking to the account holder... It's
    > the same for every celluar company. Its just for verification not for
    > the rep to access the account.
    >
    > --
    > SAVE YOUR BREATH....
    >
    > You'll need it to blow up your date.
    >
    >
    > Sergei Kosonov <[email protected]> wrote in article
    > <[email protected]>:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > direcció[email protected] (ben dejo) wrote:
    > >
    > > > If they were allowed access to the database. Most people would go
    > > > throught the billing system to retrieve this information. Which every
    > > > employee at Sprint (who are actually employed by Sprint, Brant) has
    > > > access to.

    > >
    > > But normally folks would would need a pass code. Apparently Sprint too
    > > freely gives Carte Blanche. Or is it all a charade when a CSR asks for
    > > your passcode?

    >
    > [posted via phonescoop.com]


    [posted via phonescoop.com]



  9. #9
    TechGeek
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy


    Sergei Kosonov wrote:
    > *In article <[email protected]>,
    > TechGeek <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Eric wrote:
    > > > *Ok, was just curious. They would always ask me my name and

    > user
    > > > password and pause before speaking again. I just assumed that

    > they
    > > > had
    > > > to enter in the info before their systems would give them your
    > > > account
    > > > information.
    > > >
    > > > Learn something new everyday.
    > > >
    > > > Eric *

    > >
    > > On my end of the system, I can search several ways, including

    > name,
    > > phone number, account number, customer ID (usualy social security
    > > number). The list shows me the name, beginning of the address,
    > > customer ID#, account# and a phone number if its a single line.
    > >
    > > I don't need a password to get into the account,

    >
    >
    > So whatever Sprint posts on its website about security of your
    > personal
    > informnation is in error, to put it politely. *


    I'd hate to break it to you, but EVERY company you have some sort of
    subscription to, or continual business with is like this, wether its
    cable TV, a bank, a magazine subscription, home phone company, ISP,
    credit cards, insurance agencies, etc.. are ALL like this.

    Its the privacy policies that I adhere to that is the difference. I
    didn't go prancing around about Justin's account. You didn't see me
    spurting off giving out his social security number, his SprintPCS phone
    numbers, home address (but he did post that), the notes on the account,
    his usage etc.., I can only give out that information if someone comes
    in, knows the phone number and password (or other security questions
    such as a state-issued photo ID, knowledge of the social security
    number etc..).

    THAT is the difference. I looked, but I didn't announce to the whole
    UseNet about his personal (and confidential) information, I just asked
    him about 2 other phones that he had activated on his account, which is
    legit, and considering his situation, it was also good question to
    ask.

    So, if you're going to go start brandishing that anti-SprintPCS flag
    because people who have access to the billing system has access to the
    (god forbid) billing information (it would be kinda hard to do my job
    without it!), then you might as well add in every company in this
    country that you give this infomration to.

    --
    Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap




  10. #10
    Bob Smith
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy


    "Big Poppa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > When a Sprint CSR Ask for your password, it is to just verify you

    are
    > who you say you are.. It is not needed for the CSR to access your
    > account, but to insure they are speaking to the account holder...

    It's
    > the same for every celluar company. Its just for verification not

    for
    > the rep to access the account.


    I view it the same as calling any institution where one has an
    account, whether it's the bank, utility (Water, Electric, Gas,
    telephone) company, etc. It's just there to confirm the caller is who
    they say they are ...

    Bob





  11. #11
    ben dejo
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy



    TechGeek <[email protected]> wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    >[snip]>
    > Its the privacy policies that I adhere to that is the difference.



    > I didn't go prancing around about Justin's account. You didn't see me
    > spurting off giving out his social security number, his SprintPCS phone
    > numbers, home address (but he did post that), the notes on the account,
    > his usage etc.., I can only give out that information if someone comes
    > in, knows the phone number and password (or other security questions
    > such as a state-issued photo ID, knowledge of the social security
    > number etc..).
    >
    > THAT is the difference. I looked, but I didn't announce to the whole
    > UseNet about his personal (and confidential) information, I just asked
    > him about 2 other phones that he had activated on his account, which is
    > legit, and considering his situation, it was also good question to
    > ask.


    Wait, You went into Justins account? You two have met face to face
    (without bloodshed)

    > So, if you're going to go start brandishing that anti-SprintPCS flag
    > because people who have access to the billing system has access to the
    > (god forbid) billing information (it would be kinda hard to do my job
    > without it!), then you might as well add in every company in this
    > country that you give this infomration to.


    Now you are intentionaly misrepresenting what I said. I did not say
    that you may or may not have legitimate need to access the billing
    system, I simply stated any Sprint PCS Employee can freely do so. This
    is a statement of fact, nothing more.
    >
    > --
    > Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    > Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap
    >


    [posted via phonescoop.com]



  12. #12
    TechGeek
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy


    ben dejo wrote:
    > [Wait, You went into Justins account? You two have met face to face
    > (without bloodshed)


    No, we didn't meet. He posted some information about himself and I was
    able to figure out who he was though the system.
    [color=blue]
    >
    >
    > > So, if you're going to go start brandishing that anti-SprintPCS

    > flag
    > > because people who have access to the billing system has access to

    > the
    > > (god forbid) billing information (it would be kinda hard to do my

    > job
    > > without it!), then you might as well add in every company in this
    > > country that you give this infomration to.

    >
    > Now you are intentionaly misrepresenting what I said. I did not say
    > that you may or may not have legitimate need to access the billing
    > system, I simply stated any Sprint PCS Employee can freely do so.
    > This
    > is a statement of fact, nothing more.
    > [posted via phonescoop.com]


    My comments were more towards the OP (original poster) who said:

    > So whatever Sprint posts on its website about security of your
    > personal informnation is in error, to put it politely.


    Although I'll agree, a malicious employee could use this information to
    their advantage, but SprintPCS monitors the biloling system closely,
    not only that mis-use of the infroamtion can be a federal offence.

    Also, once I log into the system, and each time I log into the program,
    I have to log in and logging in makes me agree to the TOS of that
    program, which goes by Sprint PCS's privacy policy (which is at
    http://www1.sprintpcs.com/explore/in...sPrivacy.jsp#6
    Security is #6, Privacy is #7).

    I can ask Justin how the service was on the new phones he purchased,
    yet I cannot post over the UseNet his (or anyone's for that matter)
    personal information, nor any of the information deemed as "private"
    (useage, location, ESNs, phone numbers etc..).

    --
    Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap




  13. #13
    ben dejo
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy



    TechGeek <[email protected]> wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:
    [snip]
    >
    > No, we didn't meet. He posted some information about himself and I was
    > able to figure out who he was though the system.
    >

    [snip]

    You did what? So you went into Justins' personal account without their
    permissions and without a legitimate business reason, is this correct!!!

    Justin did you know that this Invasion of Privacy had occured?

    And just what was done with the information that was collected from
    Justins account, this is a huge problem, and a huge liability issue for
    Sprint with unrestricted access to customer accounts.

    [posted via phonescoop.com]



  14. #14
    TechGeek
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy


    ben dejo wrote:
    > *You did what? So you went into Justins' personal account without
    > their
    > permissions and without a legitimate business reason, is this
    > correct!!!
    >
    > Justin did you know that this Invasion of Privacy had occured?
    >
    > And just what was done with the information that was collected from
    > Justins account, this is a huge problem, and a huge liability issue
    > for
    > Sprint with unrestricted access to customer accounts.
    >
    > [posted via phonescoop.com] *


    Like I asked before, do you expect me to go out and ask every customer
    who's phone I'm working on for permission to check their accounts for
    warranty information, validation etc?

    I did absolutely nothing other than what I would do if I had a cusotmer
    in my store with the same issue. I didn't post any "personal" or
    "confidential" infomration regarding his account, and when I was done,
    it was exactly that, I WAS DONE. I went on. (And if you'd like to
    know, I checked what model phones he had, the notes on the account, and
    the coverage where he lives, which I am allowed to do with any account
    being in my position).

    By signing onto SprintPCS service, you allow SprintPCS access to this
    information, when I'm at work, I have every right to view any
    cusotomer's account information, with or without their permission, I'm
    just not allowed to go announcing it, which I have not.

    --
    Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap




  15. #15
    TechGeek
    Guest

    Re: SPRINT and privacy


    ben dejo wrote:
    > *You did what? So you went into Justins' personal account without
    > their
    > permissions and without a legitimate business reason, is this
    > correct!!!
    >
    > Justin did you know that this Invasion of Privacy had occured?
    >
    > And just what was done with the information that was collected from
    > Justins account, this is a huge problem, and a huge liability issue
    > for
    > Sprint with unrestricted access to customer accounts.
    > [posted via phonescoop.com] *


    And if you have concerns this serious about employees of a company that
    you have dealing with, then you might as well, cancel all your credit
    cards, bank accounts, cable or satellite TV, other phone services, ISP,
    loans, bank cards, Retail "discount" cards, everything you've ever
    registered, etc..

    --
    Posted at SprintUsers.com - Your place for everything Sprint PCS
    Free wireless access @ www.SprintUsers.com/wap




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