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  1. #1
    Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    T-Mobile, until recently.

    Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?

    1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    confirmed in the final terms of the deal?

    2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    exactly same manner?

    If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?

    3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)

    For customers in CA or NV:
    The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    - Customer Service
    - I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    plans
    - T-Mobile Hotspot Service

    My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?




    See More: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:




  2. #2
    BruceR
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    It all boils down to one thing. How good is the signal where you live
    and work or wherever you use it most? Regardless of price or plan, if
    one is superior for your specific needs, that's your answer. If all
    things are equal in that regard, then check their coverage maps for
    where you're likely to travel and compare the plans based on your usage.
    My experience with ATT before they became Cingular drove me to TMo where
    I have always been treated very well.
    As to priority for native callers vs. roamers, you'd never get them to
    admit it but back in the analog days I know it was standard practice.

    From:[email protected]
    [email protected]

    > Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and
    > AT&T merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network
    > sharing deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV
    > networks to T-Mobile, until recently.
    >
    > Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    > legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having
    > access to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real
    > reason to consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is
    > concerned?
    >
    > 1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    > be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    > confirmed in the final terms of the deal?
    >
    > 2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    > with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls
    > from T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through
    > the network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    > legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    > exactly same manner?
    >
    > If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    > superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >
    > 3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    > carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    > States and is either carrier considered to have better service than
    > the other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >
    > For customers in CA or NV:
    > The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    > - Customer Service
    > - I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    > plans
    > - T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >
    > My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    > either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    > consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?






  3. #3
    Richie
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    > merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    > deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    > T-Mobile, until recently.
    >
    > Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    > legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    > to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    > consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?


    No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego, California
    and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile. With Cingular,
    you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the post merger
    Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have access to the AT&T
    (Blue) network in California.

    >
    > 1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    > be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    > confirmed in the final terms of the deal?


    Correct.

    >
    > 2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    > with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    > T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    > network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    > legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    > exactly same manner?


    The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for native
    customers vs. roamers.
    I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile, the
    infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile and
    Cingular customers had equal access to the network.

    > If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    > superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >

    I would think so.

    > 3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    > carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    > States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    > other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >

    Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only in
    major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in many areas
    of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
    infrastructure.

    > For customers in CA or NV:
    > The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    > - Customer Service
    > - I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    > plans
    > - T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >


    If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can subscribe
    to hotspot separately.
    T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes your
    cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with any plan
    then change to any other plan that fits your needs without affecting the
    length of your contract.

    > My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    > either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    > consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?


    The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
    substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
    apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.





  4. #4
    rrazor
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    On 8 May 2005 13:28:43 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    >merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    >deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    >T-Mobile, until recently.
    >


    Just a small correction, Cingular bought AT&T Wireless, there was no
    merger.


    >Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    >legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    >to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    >consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?
    >
    >1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    >be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    >confirmed in the final terms of the deal?
    >
    >2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    >with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    >T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    >network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    >legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    >exactly same manner?
    >
    >If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    >superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >
    >3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    >carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    >States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    >other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >
    >For customers in CA or NV:
    >The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    > - Customer Service
    > - I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    >plans
    > - T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >
    >My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    >either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    >consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?





  5. #5
    SFB
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about
    generalizing on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here
    in Northern California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR
    city.. TMobile coverage is better in my neighborhood since they
    installed a new tower about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at
    my home by at least 2 bars.

    As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
    coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name)
    and you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible
    account without being charged extra.

    My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You
    cannot generalize that one area or city has better reception. You
    should try BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in
    California are generally cheaper for both individual and family plans
    with TMobile, BUT you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be
    a benefit to you depending on your usage.

    Good luck!

    SFB

    PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
    Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a
    better selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).

    Richie wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    >>merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    >>deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    >>T-Mobile, until recently.
    >>
    >>Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    >>legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    >>to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    >>consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?

    >
    >
    > No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego, California
    > and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile. With Cingular,
    > you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the post merger
    > Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have access to the AT&T
    > (Blue) network in California.
    >
    >
    >>1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    >>be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    >>confirmed in the final terms of the deal?

    >
    >
    > Correct.
    >
    >
    >>2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    >>with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    >>T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    >>network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    >>legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    >>exactly same manner?

    >
    >
    > The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for native
    > customers vs. roamers.
    > I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile, the
    > infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile and
    > Cingular customers had equal access to the network.
    >
    >
    >>If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    >>superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >>

    >
    > I would think so.
    >
    >
    >>3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    >>carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    >>States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    >>other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >>

    >
    > Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only in
    > major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in many areas
    > of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
    > infrastructure.
    >
    >
    >>For customers in CA or NV:
    >>The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    >>- Customer Service
    >>- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    >>plans
    >>- T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >>

    >
    >
    > If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can subscribe
    > to hotspot separately.
    > T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes your
    > cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with any plan
    > then change to any other plan that fits your needs without affecting the
    > length of your contract.
    >
    >
    >>My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    >>either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    >>consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?

    >
    >
    > The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
    > substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
    > apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.
    >
    >





  6. #6
    Richie
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    You're right, customers should make a choice based on the coverage at their
    location.

    For contracts, independent retailers have the best deals on Cingular.
    Online and in stores, they often push 2 year contacts for any kind of
    decent phone.

    I like T-Mobile a lot. The company is innovative and the price is right.
    If it weren't for the rollover minutes at Cingular I would have the T-Mobile
    Regional Plan for $49.99.

    "SFB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about generalizing
    > on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here in Northern
    > California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR city.. TMobile
    > coverage is better in my neighborhood since they installed a new tower
    > about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at my home by at least 2
    > bars.
    >
    > As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
    > coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name) and
    > you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible account
    > without being charged extra.
    >
    > My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You cannot
    > generalize that one area or city has better reception. You should try
    > BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in California are
    > generally cheaper for both individual and family plans with TMobile, BUT
    > you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be a benefit to you
    > depending on your usage.
    >
    > Good luck!
    >
    > SFB
    >
    > PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
    > Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a better
    > selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).
    >
    > Richie wrote:
    >> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    >>>merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    >>>deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    >>>T-Mobile, until recently.
    >>>
    >>>Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    >>>legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    >>>to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    >>>consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?

    >>
    >>
    >> No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego,
    >> California and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile.
    >> With Cingular, you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the post
    >> merger Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have access to
    >> the AT&T (Blue) network in California.
    >>
    >>
    >>>1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    >>>be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    >>>confirmed in the final terms of the deal?

    >>
    >>
    >> Correct.
    >>
    >>
    >>>2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    >>>with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    >>>T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    >>>network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    >>>legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    >>>exactly same manner?

    >>
    >>
    >> The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for
    >> native customers vs. roamers.
    >> I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile,
    >> the infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile
    >> and Cingular customers had equal access to the network.
    >>
    >>
    >>>If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    >>>superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >>>

    >>
    >> I would think so.
    >>
    >>
    >>>3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    >>>carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    >>>States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    >>>other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >>>

    >>
    >> Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only in
    >> major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in many
    >> areas of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
    >> infrastructure.
    >>
    >>
    >>>For customers in CA or NV:
    >>>The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    >>>- Customer Service
    >>>- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    >>>plans
    >>>- T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can
    >> subscribe to hotspot separately.
    >> T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes
    >> your cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with
    >> any plan then change to any other plan that fits your needs without
    >> affecting the length of your contract.
    >>
    >>
    >>>My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    >>>either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    >>>consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?

    >>
    >>
    >> The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
    >> substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
    >> apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.
    >>
    >>

    >






  7. #7
    JohnF
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:


    "BruceR" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It all boils down to one thing. How good is the signal where you live and
    > work or wherever you use it most? Regardless of price or plan, if one is
    > superior for your specific needs, that's your answer. If all things are
    > equal in that regard, then check their coverage maps for where you're
    > likely to travel and compare the plans based on your usage. My experience
    > with ATT before they became Cingular drove me to TMo where I have always
    > been treated very well.
    > As to priority for native callers vs. roamers, you'd never get them to
    > admit it but back in the analog days I know it was standard practice.


    All very good points. Except that it not good enough to check the maps but
    to actually have a phone in hand and try it in the places you'll likely be
    using the phone. In my case lack of coverage for TMo in my area drove me to
    ATT. Just as lack of coverage for Cingular GSM after the merger keeps me on
    TDMA.





  8. #8
    Irv
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    i have t-mobile in los angeles and my motorola v300 gave me horrible
    coverage at home and office. i switched to an unlocked razr and it always
    says cingular roaming and the razr is much more sensitive than the v300 and
    the coverage is much better at home and office. during one recent call to
    t-mobile, i was told they were doing software upgrades on the v300 but when
    i called back to do it, they didn't know what i was talking about. so it
    goes.

    >
    >>Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    >>merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    >>deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    >>T-Mobile, until recently.
    >>

    >
    > Just a small correction, Cingular bought AT&T Wireless, there was no
    > merger.
    >
    >
    >>Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    >>legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    >>to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    >>consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?
    >>
    >>1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    >>be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    >>confirmed in the final terms of the deal?
    >>
    >>2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    >>with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    >>T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    >>network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    >>legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    >>exactly same manner?
    >>
    >>If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    >>superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >>
    >>3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    >>carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    >>States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    >>other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >>
    >>For customers in CA or NV:
    >>The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    >> - Customer Service
    >> - I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    >>plans
    >> - T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >>
    >>My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    >>either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    >>consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?

    >






  9. #9
    Danska
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:


    "Richie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > You're right, customers should make a choice based on the coverage at
    > their location.
    >
    > For contracts, independent retailers have the best deals on Cingular.
    > Online and in stores, they often push 2 year contacts for any kind of
    > decent phone.
    >
    > I like T-Mobile a lot. The company is innovative and the price is right.
    > If it weren't for the rollover minutes at Cingular I would have the
    > T-Mobile Regional Plan for $49.99.
    >

    Doesn't that have like 3000 minutes or something? With that many minutes,
    would rollover even matter?


    > "SFB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about generalizing
    >> on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here in Northern
    >> California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR city.. TMobile
    >> coverage is better in my neighborhood since they installed a new tower
    >> about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at my home by at least 2
    >> bars.
    >>
    >> As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
    >> coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name) and
    >> you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible account
    >> without being charged extra.
    >>
    >> My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You
    >> cannot generalize that one area or city has better reception. You should
    >> try BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in California are
    >> generally cheaper for both individual and family plans with TMobile, BUT
    >> you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be a benefit to you
    >> depending on your usage.
    >>
    >> Good luck!
    >>
    >> SFB
    >>
    >> PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
    >> Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a
    >> better selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).
    >>
    >> Richie wrote:
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>>Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    >>>>merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    >>>>deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    >>>>T-Mobile, until recently.
    >>>>
    >>>>Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    >>>>legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    >>>>to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    >>>>consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego,
    >>> California and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile.
    >>> With Cingular, you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the
    >>> post merger Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have
    >>> access to the AT&T (Blue) network in California.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    >>>>be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    >>>>confirmed in the final terms of the deal?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Correct.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    >>>>with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    >>>>T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    >>>>network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    >>>>legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    >>>>exactly same manner?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for
    >>> native customers vs. roamers.
    >>> I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile,
    >>> the infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile
    >>> and Cingular customers had equal access to the network.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    >>>>superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I would think so.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    >>>>carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    >>>>States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    >>>>other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only
    >>> in major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in
    >>> many areas of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
    >>> infrastructure.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>For customers in CA or NV:
    >>>>The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    >>>>- Customer Service
    >>>>- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    >>>>plans
    >>>>- T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can
    >>> subscribe to hotspot separately.
    >>> T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes
    >>> your cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with
    >>> any plan then change to any other plan that fits your needs without
    >>> affecting the length of your contract.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    >>>>either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    >>>>consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
    >>> substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
    >>> apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >






  10. #10
    razor
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    On Mon, 9 May 2005 15:38:19 -0500, "Danska" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Richie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> You're right, customers should make a choice based on the coverage at
    >> their location.
    >>
    >> For contracts, independent retailers have the best deals on Cingular.
    >> Online and in stores, they often push 2 year contacts for any kind of
    >> decent phone.
    >>
    >> I like T-Mobile a lot. The company is innovative and the price is right.
    >> If it weren't for the rollover minutes at Cingular I would have the
    >> T-Mobile Regional Plan for $49.99.
    >>

    >Doesn't that have like 3000 minutes or something? With that many minutes,
    >would rollover even matter?
    >



    I am not sure about the 49.99 plan but I do know they just started offering
    1000 minutes, including free nights & weekends, for 45.99. With T-Mobile
    you have to read the small print when it comes to these plans more than any
    other provider. The plan I just mentioned does not include free M2M. I
    think they want an extra 6.95 a month for that.


    >> "SFB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about generalizing
    >>> on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here in Northern
    >>> California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR city.. TMobile
    >>> coverage is better in my neighborhood since they installed a new tower
    >>> about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at my home by at least 2
    >>> bars.
    >>>
    >>> As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
    >>> coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name) and
    >>> you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible account
    >>> without being charged extra.
    >>>
    >>> My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You
    >>> cannot generalize that one area or city has better reception. You should
    >>> try BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in California are
    >>> generally cheaper for both individual and family plans with TMobile, BUT
    >>> you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be a benefit to you
    >>> depending on your usage.
    >>>
    >>> Good luck!
    >>>
    >>> SFB
    >>>
    >>> PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
    >>> Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a
    >>> better selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).
    >>>
    >>> Richie wrote:
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>
    >>>>>Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
    >>>>>merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    >>>>>deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    >>>>>T-Mobile, until recently.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
    >>>>>legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
    >>>>>to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
    >>>>>consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego,
    >>>> California and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile.
    >>>> With Cingular, you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the
    >>>> post merger Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have
    >>>> access to the AT&T (Blue) network in California.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
    >>>>>be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    >>>>>confirmed in the final terms of the deal?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Correct.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
    >>>>>with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
    >>>>>T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    >>>>>network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    >>>>>legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    >>>>>exactly same manner?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for
    >>>> native customers vs. roamers.
    >>>> I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile,
    >>>> the infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile
    >>>> and Cingular customers had equal access to the network.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    >>>>>superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I would think so.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    >>>>>carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    >>>>>States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
    >>>>>other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only
    >>>> in major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in
    >>>> many areas of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
    >>>> infrastructure.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>For customers in CA or NV:
    >>>>>The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    >>>>>- Customer Service
    >>>>>- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
    >>>>>plans
    >>>>>- T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can
    >>>> subscribe to hotspot separately.
    >>>> T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes
    >>>> your cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with
    >>>> any plan then change to any other plan that fits your needs without
    >>>> affecting the length of your contract.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    >>>>>either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    >>>>>consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
    >>>> substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
    >>>> apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >





  11. #11
    * * Chas
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and

    AT&T
    > merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
    > deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
    > T-Mobile, until recently.
    >
    > Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on

    the
    > legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having

    access
    > to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason

    to
    > consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?
    >
    > 1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers

    would
    > be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
    > confirmed in the final terms of the deal?
    >
    > 2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA &

    NV
    > with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls

    from
    > T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
    > network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
    > legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
    > exactly same manner?
    >
    > If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
    > superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?
    >
    > 3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
    > carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
    > States and is either carrier considered to have better service than

    the
    > other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)
    >
    > For customers in CA or NV:
    > The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
    > - Customer Service
    > - I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper

    voice/data
    > plans
    > - T-Mobile Hotspot Service
    >
    > My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
    > either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
    > consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?
    >


    It depends on where you want to use your phone in both states. I live
    in the SF Bay Area and had AT&TWS TDMA service until the end of
    January. I was travelling a lot and it worked very well throughout
    much of the country.... except around NYC, parts of NJ and most of
    the west coast.

    As recently as a year ago ALL cellular service was spotty at best in
    Southern California. AT&TWS had no coverage in the LA basin until they
    bought a 3rd rate cellular provider a few years ago. I was doing some
    business consulting in San Diego and tested 5 different carriers for
    my client. All were BAD and Nextel was the WORST!

    In Northern CA, AT&TWS absorbed Cellular1's system several years ago.
    I could look out my window and see downtown Oakland, SF, Mt. Tam and
    the Golden Gate bridge but my phone would go to roam while sitting at
    my desk.

    Service in Northern Nevada was also very spotty. AT&TWS's GSM was
    terrible in the Bay Area. I got burned out from 15 years of traveling
    the country and I'm now just covering parts of Norcal. About a year
    ago, I signed up with Verizon and I was very pleased with the service
    until about a month and a half ago when I started having service
    problems in the Oakland area where I make and receive about 25% of my
    calls.

    I've since been trying Cingular and Sprint. I tried a number of
    Cingular phones and I'm currently using an older Nokia 6340i with
    GAIT, 850/1900 GSM , 800/1900 TDMA, and 800 Mhz AMPS. The sound
    quality varies from spot to spot but the service is acceptable plus it
    works in my home where Verizon has ceased to function.

    The best reception and sound has been from Sprint. I cover from San
    Leandro north up 101 to Healdsburg and over to Napa and Sonoma. I use
    up to 4000 minutes a month so I'm probably going to drop Verizon when
    my contract expires in June and port my number over to Sprint. I'll
    also keep a pay as you go Cingular account because a lot of people in
    my company have Cingular service and I can save them money with MtoM.

    You can try out all of the major carriers in California for 30 days
    with no obligation except to pay for the minutes that you use.

    The bottom line is what is the service coverage and sound quality in
    the areas where you are going to use the phone?

    Chas.





  12. #12
    John Richards
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    "* * Chas" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >


    > The best reception and sound has been from Sprint. I cover from San
    > Leandro north up 101 to Healdsburg and over to Napa and Sonoma.


    I use my SprintPCS phone mainly in the Vallejo/Napa/Sonoma/
    Santa Rosa/Petaluma areas, and reception has been great.

    --
    John Richards



  13. #13
    * * Chas
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:


    "John Richards" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "* * Chas" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:[email protected]
    > >

    >
    > > The best reception and sound has been from Sprint. I cover from

    San
    > > Leandro north up 101 to Healdsburg and over to Napa and Sonoma.

    >
    > I use my SprintPCS phone mainly in the Vallejo/Napa/Sonoma/
    > Santa Rosa/Petaluma areas, and reception has been great.


    Sprint even works on Mare Island where I've never had service before.

    There's a few dead spots for every carrier: Hwy 121 between Sears
    Point and Hwy 12, Hwy 12 heading into the backside of Santa Rosa, 101
    between Petaluma and Novato at the dump and so on.

    The power lines on McDowell Rd. mess up the coverage along 101 through
    Petaluma at the Pengrove exit. Sprint seems to work ok there.

    Cingular works great up in the Santa Rosa Airport area but there's not
    much difference between Cingular and Verizon as far as reception goes
    in most other areas except around Oakland.

    Chas.







  14. #14

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

    Thanks for the detailed responses everyone. I'll definitely try out
    other carriers before making my final decision. I'm a bit confused as
    to why one shouldn't generalize between T-Mobile & Cingular in CA. If
    Cingular customers can roam on the legacy network which is now
    T-Mobile, as well as their own, it would seem like the clear winner as
    far as coverage throughout the state is concerned. Has T-Mobile
    actually invested in the infrastructure while they were under the
    network sharing agreement with Cingular? What about after they bought
    Cingulars' CA & NV networks? It seems to me that if T-Mobile
    continues to enhance their network and put up new towers in CA...
    Cingular users would be benefit with current roaming agreements in
    place. Or is this not the case?

    Of course, I would imagine Cingular customers can only roam on T-Mobile
    should there be no Cingular coverage available and then I wonder which
    native network would have better coverage, reception, and reliability?


    I am from the San Fernando Valley (Granada Hills, CA)... anyone have
    any idea which GSM carrier would be my best option here and best
    overall carrier. We're up in the hills so most cell carriers generally
    don't fare too well in our area - especially indoors. I have read that
    GSM 850 MHz signals travel further and penetrate deeper into
    buildings... Does this finally mean being able to use my phone at home?



    Rishi




  15. #15
    Danska
    Guest

    Re: Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:


    "razor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Mon, 9 May 2005 15:38:19 -0500, "Danska" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Richie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]
    >>> You're right, customers should make a choice based on the coverage at
    >>> their location.
    >>>
    >>> For contracts, independent retailers have the best deals on Cingular.
    >>> Online and in stores, they often push 2 year contacts for any kind of
    >>> decent phone.
    >>>
    >>> I like T-Mobile a lot. The company is innovative and the price is
    >>> right.
    >>> If it weren't for the rollover minutes at Cingular I would have the
    >>> T-Mobile Regional Plan for $49.99.
    >>>

    >>Doesn't that have like 3000 minutes or something? With that many minutes,
    >>would rollover even matter?
    >>

    >
    >
    > I am not sure about the 49.99 plan but I do know they just started
    > offering
    > 1000 minutes, including free nights & weekends, for 45.99. With T-Mobile
    > you have to read the small print when it comes to these plans more than
    > any
    > other provider. The plan I just mentioned does not include free M2M. I
    > think they want an extra 6.95 a month for that.
    >
    > I have the 45.99 plan. Yes it doesn't come with m2m. It is extra. The
    > regional plan he mentioned is 3000 anytime minutes in your designated
    > regional area. No m2m. Ld. chgs apply when calling out of your designated
    > regional area. It's meant for people who don't use much l.d. and just use
    > the phone locally. Im very happy with the 45.99 plan. Works very well. I
    > always thought it was rather simple with t-mobile. The plan is advertised
    > to have 1000 anytime minutes with no roaming fees. That's what it gives
    > you. all ads ive seen have never mentioned anything about m2m. cingular on
    > the other hand does mention m2m and rollover a lot.


    this is the cingular comparable plan:
    Monthly Cost: 69.99
    Anytime Minutes: 1,100
    Night and weekend minutes: Unlimited
    m2m: unlimited
    Contract Length: 2 years.

    T-Mobile:
    Monthly Cost: 45.99
    Anytime Minutes: 1,000
    Night and weekend minutes: Unlimited
    m2m: Nope
    Contract Length: 1 years.

    It's worth losing the m2m (since i know nobody on cingular) to save the
    $24.00

    Besides. Unlimited mobile internet (wap) is only 4.99. Cingular is 24.99 for
    unlimited use. Wow!





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