Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. #1
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest
    "Tush Smells Bush Kills!!!!!!!!!!!" wrote:
    >
    > Anyone know if these things work where there is no cellular service
    > available?
    >
    > I have a property in the mountains where there are no signal bars for
    > miles and was wondering how I could stay in touch with someone about 20
    > miles away.
    >
    > Are there regular walkie talkies with 20+ mile range?


    1. You need service for the walkie-talkie to operate.

    2. The only way to talk 20 miles is "line of sight" .... in other
    words, NOTHING in between the two units. That's why aviation
    (airplanes) can talk hundreds of miles with low wattage.

    3. You can hook up to a GMRS group and use their repeater
    and get extended range. (Possibly 10-50 miles.)

    Joe



    See More: Nextel Walkie Talkie??




  2. #2
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    Chris Hill wrote:
    >
    > On 16 May 2005 07:04:52 -0700, "Tush Smells Bush Kills!!!!!!!!!!!"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Anyone know if these things work where there is no cellular service
    > >available?
    > >
    > >I have a property in the mountains where there are no signal bars for
    > >miles and was wondering how I could stay in touch with someone about 20
    > >miles away.

    >
    > No, they use the cell towers to communicate, it is just a gimmic not a
    > true walkie talkie.


    Gimmick? How so?



  3. #3
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    Ken wrote:
    >
    > Hardly a gimmick, particularly since Qwest, Verizon and others of the
    > local phone companies are starting to offer the service.
    >
    > It does indeed use the cellular network and won't work if you can't get
    > a signal. One major advantage of the "walkie-talkie" feature is that
    > when you key up another person, you can just start talking and they
    > will hear you. They do not have to "answer" your call to receive your
    > voice transmission.
    > Another advantage is that the service can be used in "group" mode which
    > allows the sender to access several people with one keystroke.
    >
    > My wife and I have Nextel phones and we find the service very useful.
    > It is our primary means of communication when contacting one another.


    I am happy you live in an area that has sufficient coverage.

    I'm not as lucky.

    Joe



  4. #4
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    "Steven M. Scharf" wrote:
    >
    > "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hardly a gimmick, particularly since Qwest, Verizon and others of the
    > > local phone companies are starting to offer the service.
    > >
    > > It does indeed use the cellular network and won't work if you can't get
    > > a signal. One major advantage of the "walkie-talkie" feature is that
    > > when you key up another person, you can just start talking and they
    > > will hear you. They do not have to "answer" your call to receive your
    > > voice transmission.

    >
    > It can also be a major annoyance. My wife's employer insists that every
    > nurse carries a Nexel phone. They all keep them turned off, because while
    > visiting patients, they cannot be disturbed. They can't use the PTT feature
    > because they can't be broadcasting personal information. The coverage is
    > horrible so they all need to carry another cell phone as well. They call
    > PTT, PTA (Push to Annoy.


    It can really get on your nerves!



  5. #5
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    Gordon Burditt wrote:
    >
    > >It can also be a major annoyance. My wife's employer insists that every
    > >nurse carries a Nexel phone. They all keep them turned off, because while
    > >visiting patients, they cannot be disturbed. They can't use the PTT feature
    > >because they can't be broadcasting personal information. The coverage is

    >
    > If you can't broadcast personal information, you can't use a cell
    > phone OR "walkie-talkie" mode; they both broadcast whatever is said
    > over it. The nurses and the employer DO know that, I hope?
    >
    > Gordon L. Burditt


    So what?



  6. #6
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    "Steven M. Scharf" wrote:
    >
    > Gordon Burditt wrote:
    > >>It can also be a major annoyance. My wife's employer insists that every
    > >>nurse carries a Nexel phone. They all keep them turned off, because while
    > >>visiting patients, they cannot be disturbed. They can't use the PTT feature
    > >>because they can't be broadcasting personal information. The coverage is

    > >
    > > If you can't broadcast personal information, you can't use a cell
    > > phone OR "walkie-talkie" mode; they both broadcast whatever is said
    > > over it. The nurses and the employer DO know that, I hope?

    >
    > You're about ten years behind the times. This was the case with the old
    > analog AMPS system. With CDMA (Verizon, Sprint) it's extremely secure,
    > and with GSM/TDMA (AT&T, Cingular) it's very secure.
    >
    > The issue with Nextel's PTT is that they can't have patients hearing
    > anything about other patients, which would be the case if broadcasting
    > with PTT. Using Nextel simply as a cell phone still works, as iDEN is
    > also very secure, but Nextel has very poor coverage.


    No big deal .... just hit the speaker switch and use the
    walkie-talkie with the earpiece instead of the speaker,
    to listen.

    Joe



  7. #7
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    Andy Hill wrote:
    >
    > "Tush Smells Bush Kills!!!!!!!!!!!" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >...
    > >I have a property in the mountains where there are no signal bars for
    > >miles and was wondering how I could stay in touch with someone about 20
    > >miles away.
    > >
    > >Are there regular walkie talkies with 20+ mile range?
    > >

    > I doubt you'll find anything in the walkie-talkie form factor that can do 20+,
    > mainly due to the antenna requirements. To go 20+ in the UHF (such as the
    > GMRS radios) band, you'll want a pretty tall antenna to have any chance at of
    > doing a point-to-point. Now, if you want to get fancy, you could both set up
    > GMRS repeaters at your sites, and then as long as you're both within range of
    > your respective repeaters (2 miles, more or less), you can communicate with
    > handhelds (but not the cheapie, super-FRS handhelds -- you need a handheld
    > capable of duplex operation to use a repeater). Better really want to talk
    > to the guy, 'tho -- it won't be cheap to implement.


    WE all need to quit making all these radio calls (especially
    when driving) and start using the old fashioned landlines ....
    besides, my home landline has unlimited long distance.

    Joe



  8. #8
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    Gordon Burditt wrote:
    >
    > >>>It can also be a major annoyance. My wife's employer insists that every
    > >>>nurse carries a Nexel phone. They all keep them turned off, because while
    > >>>visiting patients, they cannot be disturbed. They can't use the PTT feature
    > >>>because they can't be broadcasting personal information. The coverage is
    > >>
    > >> If you can't broadcast personal information, you can't use a cell
    > >> phone OR "walkie-talkie" mode; they both broadcast whatever is said
    > >> over it. The nurses and the employer DO know that, I hope?

    > >
    > >You're about ten years behind the times. This was the case with the old
    > >analog AMPS system. With CDMA (Verizon, Sprint) it's extremely secure,
    > >and with GSM/TDMA (AT&T, Cingular) it's very secure.

    >
    > If it sends it over public airwaves, it's not secure.
    > Or are you trying to tell me that a key shared between every
    > cell tower and/or every Nextel phone can be kept secret? I
    > don't believe it.
    >
    > Gordon L. Burditt


    It's the DIGITAL AGE! WAKE UP! It's secured. Nobody can hear
    you!

    Joe



  9. #9
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    ameijers wrote:
    >
    > "Andy Hill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > "Tush Smells Bush Kills!!!!!!!!!!!" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >...
    > > >I have a property in the mountains where there are no signal bars for
    > > >miles and was wondering how I could stay in touch with someone about 20
    > > >miles away.
    > > >
    > > >Are there regular walkie talkies with 20+ mile range?
    > > >

    > > I doubt you'll find anything in the walkie-talkie form factor that can do

    > 20+,
    > > mainly due to the antenna requirements. To go 20+ in the UHF (such as

    > the
    > > GMRS radios) band, you'll want a pretty tall antenna to have any chance at

    > of
    > > doing a point-to-point. Now, if you want to get fancy, you could both

    > set up
    > > GMRS repeaters at your sites, and then as long as you're both within range

    > of
    > > your respective repeaters (2 miles, more or less), you can communicate

    > with
    > > handhelds (but not the cheapie, super-FRS handhelds -- you need a handheld
    > > capable of duplex operation to use a repeater). Better really want to

    > talk
    > > to the guy, 'tho -- it won't be cheap to implement.
    > >

    > Maybe so, maybe no- depends how tall the mountain is, and if a ridgeline is
    > between him and his buddy. We routinely get close to 10 miles point-to-point
    > with 5w vhf walkie talkies on our system on flat ground in an urban setting,
    > and 40 miles plus running through the repeater 140 feet in the air. Note
    > that these are 'real' walkie talkies, about $750 a pop. No idea what the
    > licensing costs would be for civilians- this is a federal system. VHF has
    > real good range, as long as you can get up high enough for line-of-sight.
    > Not advocating breaking any laws, but I do know there are plenty of bootleg
    > bastard-frequency systems out there, and the hardware is available cheap on
    > ebay. People just find a locally vacant freq, and set up shop.
    >
    > In the low-buck arena, a couple of CB base stations and tuned/aimed antennas
    > on a 20-foot push-up poles would probably work most of the time. Utterly no
    > privacy of course, but cheap and easy.
    >
    > OP may wanna post the same questions over in the rec.radio groups.
    >
    > aem sends...


    All repeaters have good range, period. VHF is much better than
    UHF, too!

    Joe



  10. #10
    Joe Altmyer
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    "Ted B." wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Nextel is good for its original purpose, at least in many areas. But it
    > > sucks as a general purpose phone because of the coverage.

    >
    > Tell that to employers . . . just about all employers. They think the
    > Nextel PTT function is so cool, but they don't realize that the network it
    > is on really SUCKS. Odd thing is, even if management types experience the
    > poor coverage of Nextel personally, they still don't think to switch to a
    > different cellular provider. Over several years, I've heard several excuses
    > for putting up with the ****ty coverage on nextel, ranging from "but it
    > works OK in some areas" to "we got a really good deal on it". Me, I'm
    > thinking it doesn't matter how cheap it is if it doesn't work, and working
    > OK in SOME areas is simply unacceptable.
    >
    > My last three employers have INSISTED I carry a Nextel handset. OK, so I've
    > carried it, and I've gotten sick and ****ing tired of being asked why people
    > can't get ahold of me. Could it be because most incoming calls to my nextel
    > handsets go straight to voicemail? Nawwww . . . there must be some other
    > explanation. (!) The last few years, my Nextel handset has been
    > functioning as a pager. That is, it hardly ever rings. But it will
    > eventually chime to let me know that I have voicemail. At that point, I
    > pick up my personal Cingular handset to call (whoever) back. I don't even
    > try to use the nextel handset. It's just not worth the effort. I'm too
    > busy to dick around with trying to coax it to work, for a change. -Dave


    That's a real drag! Buy a Verizon phone and be done with it.

    Joe



  11. #11
    Ralph A. Schmid, DK5RAS
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    Joe Altmyer <[email protected]> wrote:

    >All repeaters have good range, period. VHF is much better than
    >UHF, too!


    Not in general. Especially with handhelds often UHF is better, due to
    better antennae on both handheld and repeater side.



    regards - Ralph

    --

    Want to get in touch? http://www.radio-link.net/whereisralph.txt



  12. #12
    Korbin Dallas
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    On Tue, 17 May 2005 21:29:04 -0400, Joe Altmyer wrote:

    > "Ted B." wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Nextel is good for its original purpose, at least in many areas. But it
    >> > sucks as a general purpose phone because of the coverage.

    >>
    >> Tell that to employers . . . just about all employers. They think the
    >> Nextel PTT function is so cool, but they don't realize that the network it
    >> is on really SUCKS. Odd thing is, even if management types experience the
    >> poor coverage of Nextel personally, they still don't think to switch to a
    >> different cellular provider. Over several years, I've heard several excuses
    >> for putting up with the ****ty coverage on nextel, ranging from "but it
    >> works OK in some areas" to "we got a really good deal on it". Me, I'm
    >> thinking it doesn't matter how cheap it is if it doesn't work, and working
    >> OK in SOME areas is simply unacceptable.
    >>
    >> My last three employers have INSISTED I carry a Nextel handset. OK, so I've
    >> carried it, and I've gotten sick and ****ing tired of being asked why people
    >> can't get ahold of me. Could it be because most incoming calls to my nextel
    >> handsets go straight to voicemail? Nawwww . . . there must be some other
    >> explanation. (!) The last few years, my Nextel handset has been
    >> functioning as a pager. That is, it hardly ever rings. But it will
    >> eventually chime to let me know that I have voicemail. At that point, I
    >> pick up my personal Cingular handset to call (whoever) back. I don't even
    >> try to use the nextel handset. It's just not worth the effort. I'm too
    >> busy to dick around with trying to coax it to work, for a change. -Dave

    >
    > That's a real drag! Buy a Verizon phone and be done with it.
    >
    > Joe


    Thats OK, Nextel is going away. You should like the Sprint replacement
    better...



    --
    Korbin Dallas
    The name was changed to protect the guilty.




  13. #13
    Korbin Dallas
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    On Tue, 17 May 2005 21:25:26 -0400, Joe Altmyer wrote:

    > Gordon Burditt wrote:
    >>
    >> >>>It can also be a major annoyance. My wife's employer insists that every
    >> >>>nurse carries a Nexel phone. They all keep them turned off, because while
    >> >>>visiting patients, they cannot be disturbed. They can't use the PTT feature
    >> >>>because they can't be broadcasting personal information. The coverage is
    >> >>
    >> >> If you can't broadcast personal information, you can't use a cell
    >> >> phone OR "walkie-talkie" mode; they both broadcast whatever is said
    >> >> over it. The nurses and the employer DO know that, I hope?
    >> >
    >> >You're about ten years behind the times. This was the case with the old
    >> >analog AMPS system. With CDMA (Verizon, Sprint) it's extremely secure,
    >> >and with GSM/TDMA (AT&T, Cingular) it's very secure.

    >>
    >> If it sends it over public airwaves, it's not secure.
    >> Or are you trying to tell me that a key shared between every
    >> cell tower and/or every Nextel phone can be kept secret? I
    >> don't believe it.
    >>
    >> Gordon L. Burditt

    >
    > It's the DIGITAL AGE! WAKE UP! It's secured. Nobody can hear
    > you!
    >


    I'm not sure if Nextel is as secure as GSM, ( Cingular / T-Mobile) or CDMA
    (Verizon / Spring ) but it is digital, and you cant pickup a Nextel
    Scanner at Radio shack so for anything you need to send its more than
    secure enough....

    --
    Korbin Dallas
    The name was changed to protect the guilty.




  14. #14
    NexTech
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??


    "Korbin Dallas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]
    > On Tue, 17 May 2005 21:29:04 -0400, Joe Altmyer wrote:
    >
    > > "Ted B." wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >
    > >> > Nextel is good for its original purpose, at least in many areas. But

    it
    > >> > sucks as a general purpose phone because of the coverage.
    > >>
    > >> Tell that to employers . . . just about all employers. They think the
    > >> Nextel PTT function is so cool, but they don't realize that the network

    it
    > >> is on really SUCKS. Odd thing is, even if management types experience

    the
    > >> poor coverage of Nextel personally, they still don't think to switch to

    a
    > >> different cellular provider. Over several years, I've heard several

    excuses
    > >> for putting up with the ****ty coverage on nextel, ranging from "but it
    > >> works OK in some areas" to "we got a really good deal on it". Me, I'm
    > >> thinking it doesn't matter how cheap it is if it doesn't work, and

    working
    > >> OK in SOME areas is simply unacceptable.
    > >>
    > >> My last three employers have INSISTED I carry a Nextel handset. OK, so

    I've
    > >> carried it, and I've gotten sick and ****ing tired of being asked why

    people
    > >> can't get ahold of me. Could it be because most incoming calls to my

    nextel
    > >> handsets go straight to voicemail? Nawwww . . . there must be some

    other
    > >> explanation. (!) The last few years, my Nextel handset has been
    > >> functioning as a pager. That is, it hardly ever rings. But it will
    > >> eventually chime to let me know that I have voicemail. At that point,

    I
    > >> pick up my personal Cingular handset to call (whoever) back. I don't

    even
    > >> try to use the nextel handset. It's just not worth the effort. I'm

    too
    > >> busy to dick around with trying to coax it to work, for a

    ange. -Dave
    > >
    > > That's a real drag! Buy a Verizon phone and be done with it.
    > >
    > > Joe

    >
    > Thats OK, Nextel is going away. You should like the Sprint replacement
    > better...
    >


    Good! Then I don't have to work on them anymore and lie to the customers.






  15. #15
    Bob Ward
    Guest

    Re: Nextel Walkie Talkie??

    On Tue, 17 May 2005 21:24:34 -0400, Joe Altmyer <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Andy Hill wrote:
    >>
    >> "Tush Smells Bush Kills!!!!!!!!!!!" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >...
    >> >I have a property in the mountains where there are no signal bars for
    >> >miles and was wondering how I could stay in touch with someone about 20
    >> >miles away.
    >> >
    >> >Are there regular walkie talkies with 20+ mile range?
    >> >

    >> I doubt you'll find anything in the walkie-talkie form factor that can do 20+,
    >> mainly due to the antenna requirements. To go 20+ in the UHF (such as the
    >> GMRS radios) band, you'll want a pretty tall antenna to have any chance at of
    >> doing a point-to-point. Now, if you want to get fancy, you could both set up
    >> GMRS repeaters at your sites, and then as long as you're both within range of
    >> your respective repeaters (2 miles, more or less), you can communicate with
    >> handhelds (but not the cheapie, super-FRS handhelds -- you need a handheld
    >> capable of duplex operation to use a repeater). Better really want to talk
    >> to the guy, 'tho -- it won't be cheap to implement.

    >
    >WE all need to quit making all these radio calls (especially
    >when driving) and start using the old fashioned landlines ....
    >besides, my home landline has unlimited long distance.
    >
    >Joe



    I'll be over this weekend - I've got a bunch of calls to make. Thanks
    for the offer.





  • Similar Threads




  • Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast